1945 Pulitzer Prize

The following are the Pulitzer Prizes for 1945.

Journalism awards

Letters, Drama and Music Awards

Special Citations and Awards

  • Journalism:
    • The cartographers of the American press for maps of the war fronts that have helped notably to clarify and increase public information on the progress of the Armies and Navies engaged.

External links

A Bell for Adano (novel)

A Bell for Adano is a 1944 novel by John Hersey, the winner of the 1945 Pulitzer Prize for the Novel. It tells the story of an Italian-American officer in Sicily during World War II who wins the respect and admiration of the people of the town of Adano by helping them find a replacement for the town bell that the Fascists had melted down for rifle barrels.

Alfred A. Knopf

Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. () is a New York publishing house that was founded by Alfred A. Knopf Sr. and Blanche Knopf in 1915. Blanche and Alfred traveled abroad regularly and were known for publishing European, Asian, and Latin American writers in addition to leading American literary trends. It was acquired by Random House in 1960, which was later acquired by Bertelsmann in 1998, and is now part of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. The Knopf publishing house is associated with its borzoi colophon, which was designed by co-founder Blanche Knopf in 1925.

Appalachian Spring

Appalachian Spring is a composition by Aaron Copland that premiered in 1944 and has achieved widespread and enduring popularity as an orchestral suite. The ballet, scored for a thirteen-member chamber orchestra, was created upon commission of choreographer and dancer Martha Graham with funds from the Coolidge Foundation. It premiered on Monday, October 30, 1944 at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., with Martha Graham dancing the lead role. The set was designed by the American sculptor Isamu Noguchi. Copland was awarded the 1945 Pulitzer Prize for Music for his achievement.

Gouverneur Morris Jr.

Gouverneur Morris II (February 9, 1813 – August 20, 1888) was an American railroad executive and the son of a founding father of the United States, Gouverneur Morris.

Hollywood Cemetery (Richmond, Virginia)

Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery located next to Richmond, Virginia's Oregon Hill neighborhood at 412 South Cherry Street. Characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River, it is the resting place of two United States Presidents, James Monroe and John Tyler, as well as the only Confederate States President, Jefferson Davis. It is also the resting place of 28 Confederate generals, more than any other cemetery in the country; these include George Pickett and J.E.B. Stuart.

List of American print journalists

This is a list of selected American print journalists, including some of the more notable figures of 20th-century newspaper and magazine journalism.

List of Hotchkiss School alumni

This is a list of notable alumni of the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut of the New York metropolitan area. Former pupils are known as Pythians (even entrance year) or Olympians (odd entrance year).

List of Irish Americans

This is a list of notable Irish Americans, including both original immigrants who obtained American citizenship and their American-born descendants. For more information see also: List of Americans of Irish descent.

List of people from New Jersey

The following is a list of notable people from the U.S. state of New Jersey.

Mary Chase (playwright)

Mary Coyle Chase (born Mary Agnes McDonough Coyle; 25 February 1906 – 20 October 1981) was an American journalist, playwright and children's novelist, known primarily for writing the Broadway play Harvey, later adapted for film starring James Stewart.

She wrote fourteen plays, two children's novels, and one screenplay, and worked seven years at the Rocky Mountain News as a journalist. Three of her plays were made into Hollywood films: Sorority House (1939), Harvey (1950), and Bernardine (1957).

New York Herald Tribune

The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper published between 1924 and 1966. It was created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. It was widely regarded as a "writer's newspaper" and competed with The New York Times in the daily morning market. The paper won at least nine Pulitzer Prizes during its lifetime.A "Republican paper, a Protestant paper and a paper more representative of the suburbs than the ethnic mix of the city", the Tribune generally did not match the comprehensiveness of The New York Times' coverage, but its national, international and business coverage was generally viewed as among the best in the industry, as was its overall style. At one time or another, the paper was home to such writers as Dorothy Thompson, Red Smith, Roger Kahn, Richard Watts, Jr., Homer Bigart, Walter Kerr, Walter Lippmann, St. Clair McKelway, Judith Crist, Dick Schaap, Tom Wolfe, John Steinbeck, and Jimmy Breslin. Editorially, the newspaper was the voice for eastern Republicans, later referred to as Rockefeller Republicans, and espoused a pro-business, internationalist viewpoint.

The paper, first owned by the Reid family, struggled financially for most of its life and rarely generated enough profit for growth or capital improvements; the Reids subsidized the Herald Tribune through the paper's early years. However, it enjoyed prosperity during World War II and by the end of the conflict had pulled close to the Times in ad revenue. A series of disastrous business decisions, combined with aggressive competition from the Times and poor leadership from the Reid family, left the Herald Tribune far behind its rival.

In 1958, the Reids sold the Herald Tribune to John Hay Whitney, a multimillionaire Wall Street investor who was serving as ambassador to the United Kingdom at the time. Under his leadership, the Tribune experimented with new layouts and new approaches to reporting the news, and made important contributions to the body of New Journalism that developed in the 1960s. The paper steadily revived under Whitney, but a 114-day newspaper strike stopped the Herald Tribune's gains and ushered in four years of strife with labor unions, particularly the local chapter of the International Typographical Union. Faced with mounting losses, Whitney attempted to merge the Herald Tribune with the New York World-Telegram and the New York Journal-American in the spring of 1966; the proposed merger led to another lengthy strike, and on August 15, 1966, Whitney announced the closure of the Herald Tribune. Combined with investments in the World Journal Tribune, Whitney spent $39.5 million (equivalent to $304,835,696 in 2018 dollars) in his attempts to keep the newspaper alive.After the New York Herald Tribune closed, the Times and The Washington Post, joined by Whitney, entered an agreement to operate the International Herald Tribune, the paper's former Paris publication. The International Herald Tribune was renamed the International New York Times in 2013 and is now named The New York Times International Edition. New York magazine, created as the Herald Tribune's Sunday magazine in 1963, was revived by editor Clay Felker in 1968, and continues to publish today.

Pulitzer Prize Special Citations and Awards

The Pulitzer Prize jury has the option of awarding special citations and awards where they consider necessary. Since 1918, forty-four such special citations and awards have been given. The awards are sixteen journalism awards, twelve letters awards, fourteen music awards, and five service awards. Prizes for the award vary. The Pulitzer Foundation has stated that the Special Citations given to George Gershwin, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Duke Ellington were in response to criticism for the failure of the Foundation to cite the four.

Pyle (surname)

Pyle is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Andrew Pyle (philosopher) (born 1955), British philosopher

Andrew Pyle (economist) (born 1963), Canadian economist

Artimus Pyle (born 1948), drummer for the rock & roll group Lynyrd Skynyrd

Barry Pyle (born 1965), American political scientist

Christopher Pyle (born 1939), American professor of politics

David Pyle (1936–2002), English footballer

Denver Pyle (1920–1997), American actor

Don Pyle, Canadian record producer

Elijah Pyle (1918–2009), English professional footballer

Ellen Bernard Thompson Pyle (1876–1936), American illustrator

Ernie Pyle (1900–1945), Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

Gladys Pyle (1890–1989), South Dakota politician

Howard Pyle (1853–1911), American illustrator and writer

John A. Pyle, British atmospheric scientist

John Howard Pyle (1906–1987), 12th governor of Arizona

Katharine Pyle, (1863–1938), American author, poet, and illustrator

Kenneth B. Pyle, Historian and professor history

Mamie Shields Pyle, (1866–1949) American suffragist

Mike Pyle (born 1939), American football player with the Chicago Bears (1961–1969)

Mike Pyle (fighter) (born 1975), American mixed martial arts fighter

Missi Pyle (born 1972), American actress

Nancy Pyle, American politician

Pip Pyle (1950–2006), English drummer

Richard Pyle, diving marine biologist

Robert Michael Pyle (born 1947), American naturalist

Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima

Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima is an iconic photograph taken by Joe Rosenthal on February 23, 1945, which depicts six United States Marines raising a U.S. flag atop Mount Suribachi, during the Battle of Iwo Jima, in World War II.The photograph was first published in Sunday newspapers on February 25, 1945. It was extremely popular and was reprinted in thousands of publications. Later, it became the only photograph to win the Pulitzer Prize for Photography in the same year as its publication, and came to be regarded in the United States as one of the most significant and recognizable images of the war.

Three Marines in the photograph, Sergeant Michael Strank, Corporal Harlon Block (misidentified as Sergeant Hank Hansen until January 1947), and Private First Class Franklin Sousley were killed in action over the next few days. The other three surviving flag-raisers in the photograph were Corporals (then Private First Class) Rene Gagnon, Ira Hayes, and Harold Schultz (misidentified as PhM2c. John Bradley until June 2016). Both men originally misidentified as flag raisers had helped raise a smaller flag about 90 minutes earlier, and were both still on the mountaintop and witnessed – but were not part of – the specific moment of raising the larger flag that was captured in the Pulitzer Prize–winning photo. All men were under the command of Brigadier General Harry B. Liversedge.

The image was later used by Felix de Weldon to sculpt the Marine Corps War Memorial, which was dedicated in 1954 to all Marines who died for their country and is located in Arlington Ridge Park, near the Ord-Weitzel Gate to Arlington National Cemetery and the Netherlands Carillon.

The copyright holder, the Associated Press, relinquished its rights to the photograph, placing it in the public domain.

Russel B. Nye

Russel Blaine Nye (February 17, 1913 – September 2, 1993) was an American professor of English who in the 1960s pioneered Popular Culture Theory. He is the author of a dozen books. His book George Bancroft: Brahmin Rebel won the 1945 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography.

Born in Viola, Wisconsin, Nye received his bachelor's degree from Oberlin College in 1934 and his master's degree from the University of Wisconsin in English the following year. In 1938 he married Kathryn Chaney, and in 1940 he completed his doctorate on George Bancroft again at the University of Wisconsin. Nye taught in the English department at Michigan State University from 1941 to 1979.In 1957 after the director of the Detroit Public Library claimed that Frank L. Baum's novel The Wizard of Oz had no value and shouldn't be stocked by libraries, Nye and Martin Gardner published a new critical edition of the novel bringing out its value, causing a firestorm of controversy, followed by eventual acceptance.

In 1970 he co-founded the Popular Culture Association with Ray B. Browne and Marshall Fishwick, working to shape a new academic discipline called Popular Culture Theory that blurred the traditional distinctions between high and low culture, focusing on mass culture mediums like television and the Internet, and cultural archetypes like comic book heroes.

He died in Lansing, Michigan in 1993.

Stephen Bonsal

Stephen Bonsal (March 29, 1865 – June 8, 1951) was an American journalist, war correspondent, author, diplomat and translator, who won the 1945 Pulitzer Prize for History.

Viola, Wisconsin

Viola is a village in Richland (mostly) and Vernon Counties in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, United States. The population was 699 at the 2010 census. Of this, 477 were in Richland County, and 222 were in Vernon County.

White (surname)

White is a surname either of English or of Scottish and Irish origin, the latter being an anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic MacGillebhàin, "Son of the fair gillie" and the Irish "Mac Faoitigh" or "de Faoite". It is the seventeenth most common surname in England. In the 1990 United States Census, "White" ranked fourteenth among all reported surnames in frequency, accounting for 0.28% of the population. By 2000, White had fallen to position 20 in the United States and 22nd position by 2014

Notable people with the surname include:

White (Hampshire cricketer) (active 1789–1797, full name unknown), English cricketer

White (Surrey cricketer) (active 1850, full name unknown), English cricketer

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