1945 Cleveland Indians season

1945 Cleveland Indians
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Alva Bradley
General manager(s)Roger Peckinpaugh
Manager(s)Lou Boudreau
Local radionone
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Regular season

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB
Detroit Tigers 88 65 .575 --
Washington Senators 87 67 .565 1.5
St. Louis Browns 81 70 .536 6
New York Yankees 81 71 .533 6.5
Cleveland Indians 73 72 .503 11
Chicago White Sox 71 78 .477 15
Boston Red Sox 71 83 .461 17.5
Philadelphia Athletics 52 98 .357 34.5

Record vs. opponents

1945 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS CWS CLE DET NYY PHI STL WSH
Boston 9–13 11–11 12–10–1 6–16 14–8 8–14–1 11–11–1
Chicago 13–9 11–8–1 10–12 9–12 12–10 8–13 8–14
Cleveland 11–11 8–11–1 11–11 12–9 12–6–1 11–10 8–14
Detroit 10–12–1 12–10 11–11 15–7 15–7–1 15–6 10–12
New York 16–6 12–9 9–12 7–15 16–6 7–15 14–8
Philadelphia 8–14 10–12 6–12–1 7–15–1 6–16 10–12–1 5–17
St. Louis 14–8–1 13–8 10–11 6–15 15–7 12–10–1 11–11–1
Washington 11–11–1 14–8 14–8 12–10 8–14 17–5 11–11–1

Notable transactions

Roster

1945 Cleveland Indians
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Frankie Hayes 119 385 91 .236 6 43
1B Mickey Rocco 143 565 149 .264 10 56
2B Dutch Meyer 130 524 153 .292 7 48
SS Lou Boudreau 97 345 106 .307 3 48
3B Don Ross 106 363 95 .262 2 43
OF Pat Seerey 126 414 98 .237 14 56
OF Jeff Heath 102 370 113 .305 15 61
OF Felix Mackiewicz 120 359 98 .273 2 37

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Al Cihocki 92 283 60 .212 0 24
Paul O'Dea 87 221 52 .235 1 21
Les Fleming 42 140 46 .329 3 22
Myril Hoag 40 128 27 .211 0 3
Ed Wheeler 46 72 14 .194 0 2
Eddie Carnett 30 73 16 .219 0 7
Jim McDonnell 28 51 10 .196 0 8
Hank Ruszkowski 14 49 10 .204 0 5
Elmer Weingartner 20 39 9 .231 0 1
Roy Cullenbine 8 13 1 .077 0 0
Red Steiner 12 20 3 .150 0 2
Stan Benjamin 14 21 7 .333 0 3
Papa Williams 16 19 4 .211 0 0
Bob Rothel 4 10 2 .200 0 0
Gene Desautels 10 9 1 .111 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Steve Gromek 33 251.0 19 9 2.55 101
Allie Reynolds 44 247.1 18 12 3.20 112
Jim Bagby 25 159.1 8 11 3.73 38
Al Smith 21 133.2 5 12 3.84 34
Mel Harder 11 76.0 3 7 3.67 16

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Bob Feller 9 72.0 5 3 2.50 59
Red Embree 8 70.0 4 4 1.93 42
Hal Kleine 3 7.0 0 0 3.86 5
Myril Hoag 2 3.0 0 0 0.00 0
Paul O'Dea 1 2.0 0 0 13.50 0
Eddie Carnett 2 2.0 0 0 0.00 1
Paul Calvert 1 1.1 0 0 13.50 1

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Ed Klieman 38 5 8 4 3.85 33
Pete Center 31 6 3 1 3.99 34
Jack Salveson 19 0 0 0 3.68 11
Earl Henry 15 0 3 0 5.40 10

Awards and honors

All-Star Game (note: rosters were named by Associated Press writers, but game was not played due to travel restrictions during World War II)[2]

Lou Boudreau, Shortstop

Steve Gromek, Pitcher

Frankie Hayes, Catcher

Jeff Heath, Outfielder

Allie Reynolds, Pitcher

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AA Baltimore Orioles International League Alphonse "Tommy" Thomas
A Wilkes-Barre Barons Eastern League Dick Porter and Mike McNally
D Batavia Clippers PONY League Jack Tighe

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Batavia[3]

Notes

  1. ^ Frankie Hayes at Baseball Reference
  2. ^ "1945 All-Star Game - BR Bullpen". www.baseball-reference.com. Retrieved October 27, 2017.
  3. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 3rd edition. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 2007

References

Earl Henry

Earl Clifford Henry (June 10, 1917 – December 10, 2002), nicknamed "Hook", was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played for two seasons. He pitched two games for the Cleveland Indians during the 1944 Cleveland Indians season and 15 games during the 1945 Cleveland Indians season.

Ed Wheeler (1940s infielder)

Edward Raymond Wheeler (May 24, 1915 – August 4, 1983) was a Major League Baseball infielder who played for one season. He played in 46 games for the Cleveland Indians during the 1945 Cleveland Indians season, splitting time as a third baseman and shortstop. He was born in Los Angeles and he died in Centralia, Washington.

Pat Seerey

James Patrick Seerey (March 17, 1923 – April 28, 1986) was an American professional baseball player. An outfielder, Seerey played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for seven seasons in the American League with the Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. In 561 career games, Seerey recorded a batting average of .224 and accumulated 86 home runs and 261 runs batted in (RBI).

Born in Oklahoma and raised in Arkansas, Seerey played football and baseball in high school. After graduating, he joined the Cleveland Indians' farm system in 1941, and made his major league debut two-and-a-half years later. He was primarily a starting outfielder the next five seasons for the Indians, but led the league in strikeouts four times. He was traded partway through the 1948 season to the Chicago White Sox, and a month after being traded became the fifth player in major league history to hit four home runs in one game. The following season, he was sent to the minor leagues, and played a few seasons in the farm system for the White Sox before retiring.

Red Steiner

James Harry Steiner (January 7, 1915 – November 16, 2001) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cleveland Indians and Boston Red Sox during the 1945 season. Listed at 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m), 185 lb., he batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

A native of Los Angeles, California, Steiner was one of many players who only appeared in the majors during World War II. He was a .190 hitter (15-for-79) with six runs, one double, and six RBI without home runs in 38 games. In 28 catching appearances he posted a .989 fielding percentage (one error in 91 chances).

Steiner died in Gardena, California, at the age of 86.

Steve Gromek

Stephen Joseph Gromek (January 15, 1920 – March 12, 2002) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for 17 seasons in the American League with the Cleveland Indians and Detroit Tigers. In 447 career games, Gromek pitched 2,064⅔ innings and posted a win–loss record of 123–108 with 92 complete games, 17 shutouts, and a 3.41 earned run average (ERA).

Born in Hamtramck, Michigan, Gromek originally began playing professionally with the Indians organization as an infielder, but became a pitcher early on, and made his major league debut in 1941. He played sparingly his first three years before becoming an everyday starter in 1944 and 1945, earning his lone All-Star appearance in the latter year. After the war ended, he became a spot starter, spending time as both a starting pitcher and relief pitcher. Gromek was the winning pitcher in game four of the 1948 World Series with the Cleveland Indians. His career is best remembered for a post game celebratory photo taken of him hugging Larry Doby, the first black player in the American League, whose third inning home run provided the margin of victory. The photo became a symbol for integration in baseball.Gromek remained in the spot starter role with the Indians until 1953, when he was traded to the Tigers. The Tigers used him solely as a starting pitcher, and had 18 wins in his first full season with them in 1954. He played two more full seasons with the Tigers, and retired during the 1957 season. Gromek then became a player-manager for the Erie Sailors for one year, became a car insurance sales representative after his retirement, and died in 2002.

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