1945–46 NHL season

The 1945–46 NHL season was the 29th season of the National Hockey League. The Montreal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup, defeating the Boston Bruins for the team's sixth championship.

1945–46 NHL season
LeagueNational Hockey League
SportIce hockey
DurationOctober 24, 1945 – April 9, 1946
Number of games50
Number of teams6
Regular season
Season championMontreal Canadiens
Season MVPMax Bentley (Black Hawks)
Top scorerMax Bentley (Black Hawks)
Stanley Cup
ChampionsMontreal Canadiens
  Runners-upBoston Bruins

League business

Synchronized red lights to signal goals were made obligatory for all NHL rinks.

It was rumoured in the press that Lester Patrick planned to retire as general manager of the New York Rangers. On February 22, 1946, he announced his retirement from the general manager position, however he would stay on as vice president of Madison Square Garden.

Regular season

Veterans came back to their teams this year, as World War II ended, but many found they could not regain their form. One who did regain his form was the man formerly known as "Mr. Zero"—Boston Bruins' goaltender Frank Brimsek. He was shelled in an 8–3 contest with Chicago, but got better game by game. The Bruins had first place at one point, then finished second. Brimsek made the Second All-Star Team as a result.

Max Bentley of Chicago led the league in scoring, and, because of the "Pony Line" including him, his brother Doug and Bill Mosienko, the Black Hawks were in first place at one point. But misfortune hit the Hawks when Doug Bentley injured his knee in a January 23 game and the team sagged.

Frank Patrick, former Pacific Coast Hockey Association president and former managing director for the NHL, suffered a heart attack and was not released from the hospital for several weeks.

A bombshell exploded on January 30, 1946, when defenceman Babe Pratt was expelled from the NHL for betting on games. However, he only bet on his own team and appealed his expulsion. On his promise he would not bet on any more games, he was reinstated. Pratt missed 9 games during his suspension.

Maple Leaf Gaye Stewart led the league in goals with 37, but Toronto finished fifth and missed the playoffs for the first time since playing at Maple Leaf Gardens.

Bill Durnan equalled George Hainsworth's record of three consecutive Vezina Trophies and led the league in shutouts with 4.

Final standings

National Hockey League[1]
GP W L T GF GA DIFF Pts
1 Montreal Canadiens 50 28 17 5 172 134 +38 61
2 Boston Bruins 50 24 18 8 167 156 +11 56
3 Chicago Black Hawks 50 23 20 7 200 178 +22 53
4 Detroit Red Wings 50 20 20 10 146 159 −13 50
5 Toronto Maple Leafs 50 19 24 7 174 185 −11 45
6 New York Rangers 50 13 28 9 144 191 −47 35

Playoffs

Playoff bracket

Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
      
1 Montreal 4
3 Chicago 0
1 Montreal 4
2 Boston 1
2 Boston 4
4 Detroit 1

Semifinals

(1) Montreal Canadiens vs. (3) Chicago Black Hawks

The Montreal Canadiens finished first in the league with 61 points. The Chicago Blackhawks finished third with 53 points. This was the seventh playoff meeting between these two teams with the teams splitting the six previous series. They last met in the 1944 Stanley Cup Finals where Montreal won in four games. Montreal won this year's ten game regular season series earning eleven of twenty points.

Montreal wins 4–0

(2) Boston Bruins vs. (4) Detroit Red Wings

The Boston Bruins finished second in the league with 56 points. The Detroit Red Wings finished fourth with 50 points. This was the fifth playoff meeting between these two teams with Detroit winning the three of the four previous series. They last met in the previous year's Stanley Cup Semifinals where the Red Wings won in seven games. Boston won this year's ten game regular season series earning eleven of twenty points.

Boston won series 4–1

Stanley Cup Finals

This was the fifth playoff meeting between these two teams with the teams splitting the four previous series. They last met in the 1943 Stanley Cup Semifinals where Boston won in five games. Montreal won this year's ten game regular season series earning eleven of twenty points.

Montreal won series 4–1

Awards

The NHL changed the criteria for the Vezina Trophy to award it to the goaltender who plays the most games for the team which gives up the least goals in the season.

Award winners
O'Brien Cup:
(Stanley Cup runner-up)
Boston Bruins
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(Regular season champion)
Montreal Canadiens
Calder Memorial Trophy:
(Best first-year player)
Edgar Laprade, New York Rangers
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Max Bentley, Chicago Black Hawks
Lady Byng Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Toe Blake, Montreal Canadiens
Vezina Trophy:
(Goaltender of team with lowest GAA)
Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens
All-Star teams
First team   Position   Second team
Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens G Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins
Jack Crawford, Boston Bruins D Ken Reardon, Montreal Canadiens
Emile "Butch" Bouchard, Montreal Canadiens D Jack Stewart, Detroit Red Wings
Max Bentley, Chicago Black Hawks C Elmer Lach, Montreal Canadiens
Maurice Richard, Montreal Canadiens RW Bill Mosienko, Chicago Black Hawks
Gaye Stewart, Toronto Maple Leafs LW Toe Blake, Montreal Canadiens
Dick Irvin, Montreal Canadiens Coach Johnny Gottselig, Chicago Black Hawks

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

Player Team GP G A Pts PIM
Max Bentley Chicago Black Hawks 47 31 30 61 6
Gaye Stewart Toronto Maple Leafs 50 37 15 52 8
Toe Blake Montreal Canadiens 50 29 21 50 2
Clint Smith Chicago Black Hawks 50 26 24 50 2
Maurice Richard Montreal Canadiens 50 27 22 49 50
Bill Mosienko Chicago Black Hawks 40 18 30 48 12
Ab DeMarco New York Rangers 50 20 27 47 20
Elmer Lach Montreal Canadiens 50 13 34 47 34
Alex Kaleta Chicago Black Hawks 49 19 27 46 17
Billy Taylor Toronto Maple Leafs 48 23 18 41 14

Source: NHL[2]

Leading goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; Min – Minutes Played; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts

Player Team GP MIN GA GAA W L T SO
Bill Durnan Montreal Canadiens 40 2400 104 2.60 24 11 5 4
Harry Lumley Detroit Red Wings 50 3000 159 3.18 20 20 10 2
Frank Brimsek Boston Bruins 34 2040 111 3.26 16 14 4 2
Mike Karakas Chicago Black Hawks 48 2880 166 3.46 22 19 7 1
Turk Broda Toronto Maple Leafs 15 900 53 3.53 6 6 3 0
Frank McCool Toronto Maple Leafs 22 1320 81 3.68 10 9 3 0
Chuck Rayner New York Rangers 40 2377 149 3.76 12 21 7 1
Jim Henry New York Rangers 11 623 42 4.04 1 7 2 1

Coaches

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1945–46 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1945–46 (listed with their last team):

See also

References

  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (1994). Years of glory, 1942–1967: the National Hockey League's official book of the six-team era. Toronto, ON: McClelland and Stewart. ISBN 0-7710-2817-2.
  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X.
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Toronto, ON: Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5.
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9.
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1973). The Story of the National Hockey League. New York, NY: Pagurian Press. ISBN 0-684-13424-1.
Notes
  1. ^ "1945–1946 Division Standings Standings - NHL.com - Standings". National Hockey League.
  2. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 148.

External links

1945–46 Boston Bruins season

The 1945–46 Boston Bruins season was the Boston Bruins 22nd season of operation in the National Hockey League. The Bruins made it to the 1946 Stanley Cup Final only to lose to the rival Montreal Canadiens four games to one.

1945–46 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1945–46 Chicago Black Hawks season was the teams 20th season in the National Hockey League, and they were coming off a disappointing season in 1944–45, failing to qualify for the playoffs.

With Doug Bentley, Max Bentley, and Red Hamill returning to the team after World War II, the Black Hawks would set a team record by scoring 200 goals, which also led the NHL. The Hawks allowed 178, which ranked them 4th. The Hawks would finish the season with a 23–20–7 record, good for 53 points, which was their highest total since the 1934–35 season, and they would finish in 3rd place in the NHL.

Offensively, the Hawks were led by Max Bentley, who scored a team high 31 goals, and had an NHL high 61 points, while winning the Hart Trophy. Clint Smith had a solid season, registering 50 points, while Bill Mosienko would have 48. Doug Bentley missed 14 games due to injuries, but still finished with 40 points. Team captain John Mariucci would lead the Hawks defensemen with 11 points, and have a team high 58 penalty minutes.

In goal, Mike Karakas would get a majority of the action, earning a career high 22 wins, while posting a 3.46 GAA and a shutout along the way.

The 3rd seeded Hawks would face the 1st place team, the Montreal Canadiens, in a best of 7 series in the opening round of the playoffs. Montreal finished 8 points ahead of the Hawks, and had recently swept Chicago in the 1944 Stanley Cup Finals. The Canadiens once again proved to be too much for the Hawks to handle, as they blew out the Hawks in each of the 4 games they played to sweep the series.

1945–46 Detroit Red Wings season

The 1945–46 Detroit Red Wings season was the Detroit NHL franchise's 20th season of operation.

1945–46 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1945–46 Montreal Canadiens season was the Canadiens' 37th season of play. The Canadiens placed first during the regular season to qualify for the playoffs. The Canadiens defeated the Boston Bruins in the Stanley Cup Finals to win the Stanley Cup for the sixth time.

1945–46 New York Rangers season

The 1945–46 New York Rangers season was the 20th season for the team in the National Hockey League (NHL). During the regular season, the Rangers compiled a 13–28–9 record and finished with 35 points. With a last-place finish, the Rangers did not qualify for the NHL playoffs.

1945–46 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1945–46 Toronto Maple Leafs season was the 29th season of play of the Toronto NHL franchise. Although the club was the defending Stanley Cup champion, the team's play declined and the club finished in fifth, missing the playoffs.

1946 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1946 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-seven series between the Boston Bruins and the Montreal Canadiens. The Canadiens would win the series four games to one.

1946–47 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1946–47 Toronto Maple Leafs season involved winning the Stanley Cup. During the season, Maple Leaf Gardens was the first arena in the NHL to have Plexiglas inserted in the end zones of the rink.

Armand Delmonte

Armand Romeo "Dutch" Delmonte (June 3, 1927 — April 7, 1981) was a Canadian professional ice hockey right winger who played in one National Hockey League game for the Boston Bruins during the 1945–46 NHL season.

Del Monte also played for the St. Catharines Falcons from 1943 to 1945, Boston Olympics from 1945 to 1948, Los Angeles Monarchs from 1946 to 1947, St. Paul Saints from 1947 to 1951, Tacoma Rockets from 1951 to 1952, Cleveland Barons from 1952 to 1953, Ottawa Senators from 1953 to 1954, and the Marion Barons from 1953 to 1954.

Bobby Bauer

Robert Theodore "Bobby" Bauer (February 16, 1915 – September 16, 1964) was a Canadian professional ice hockey right winger who played 10 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Boston Bruins. He was a member of the famed "Kraut Line" with teammates Milt Schmidt and Woody Dumart. The trio led the Bruins to two Stanley Cup championships and became the first line to finish first, second and third in NHL scoring, in 1939–40. Bauer was named to the All-Star Team four times and was a three-time winner of the Lady Byng Trophy, awarded for gentlemanly conduct combined with a high calibre of play. He recorded only 36 penalties in minutes in 327 games.

Prior to his NHL career, Bauer won the Memorial Cup with the St. Michael's Majors in 1934 as junior champions of Canada. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1942 and won the Allan Cup with the Ottawa RCAF Flyers as senior champions that year. Bauer turned to coaching following his NHL career and guided the Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen to two Allan Cup championships. The Dutchmen were sent to represent Canada at the 1956 Winter Olympics where Bauer coached the team to a bronze medal. He also coached the Canadian entry at the 1960 Winter Olympics that won a silver medal. Bauer assisted his brother David in creating the Canadian national hockey team in the 1960s. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1996.

Leo Reise Jr.

Leo Charles Reise Jr. (June 7, 1922 – July 26, 2015) was a professional ice hockey player in the NHL and son of former pro Leo Reise. Reise was born in Stoney Creek, Ontario.

List of family relations in the NHL

This is a list of family relations in the National Hockey League. Since the creation of the National Hockey League in 1917, family members have been involved in all aspects of the league. Although most connections are among players, there have been family members involved in coaching and managing as well.

Since 1917, 47 pairs of brothers have played together on the same team; among them, ten have won the Stanley Cup together. Brothers have also squared off against each other five times in the Stanley Cup finals, most recently in 2003. Twenty-six sons have followed in their fathers' footsteps and played for his team. Only once has a father played with his sons, when Gordie Howe played with Mark and Marty for one season with the Hartford Whalers.

The Chicago Blackhawks have seen the most familial connections with 31: twenty sets of brothers, five father-son combinations, three uncle-nephew combinations, and three sets of cousins.

The Sutter family has had the largest number of family members – nine – play, coach and manage in the NHL. The original six brothers (Brent, Brian, Darryl, Duane, Rich, and Ron) and three of their sons (cousins Brandon, Brett, and Brody) result in multiple brother/father-son/uncle-nephew/cousin combinations.

The longest multi-generational family is the direct line of four generations starting with Howie Morenz, father-in-law of Bernie Geoffrion, who fathered Dan Geoffrion, who fathered Blake Geoffrion. All four generations have played for the Montreal Canadiens. Howie's brother-in-law was Montreal and Boston player Billy Coutu.

Below is a list of family relations throughout the NHL as players, head coaches, general managers, and officials. Owners are not included, as inheritance makes these relations more routine.

Names in bold have won the Stanley Cup. Names in italics are members of the Hockey Hall of Fame. An asterisk (*) denotes a current (2018–19 NHL season) NHL player.

Punch line (ice hockey)

The Punch line was a famous ice hockey line for the Montreal Canadiens in the 1940s. It consisted of Elmer Lach at center, Toe Blake on left wing, and Maurice Richard on the right side.

During their time together, they led the Canadiens to two Stanley Cup victories. During the 1944–45 NHL season, the three finished first (Lach), second (Richard), and third (Blake) in scoring for the league. They would also form the forward line for the first all-star team in that same season. Richard would be the first team all-star right wing for all but one year while with Blake and Lach.

Roland McLenahan

Roland Joseph "Rollie" McLenahan (October 26, 1921 – April 23, 1984) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player and coach. He played 60 games in the National Hockey League for the Detroit Red Wings during the 1945–46 NHL season.

March 19 Chicago Black Hawks 2–6 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
George Gee (1) – pp – 17:25 First period 08:33 – Dutch Hiller (1)
No scoring Second period 08:32 – Elmer Lach (1)
16:29 – ppBilly Reay (1)
16:48 – pp – Dutch Hiller (2)
Bill Mosienko (1) – pp – 12:22 Third period 10:29 – Toe Blake (1)
14:40 – Maurice Richard (1)
Mike Karakas Goalie stats Bill Durnan
March 21 Chicago Black Hawks 1–5 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Clint Smith (1) – 19:13 First period 06:40 – Bob Fillion (1)
09:14 – Jimmy Peters (1)
09:45 – Maurice Richard (2)
No scoring Second period 10:02 – Ken Mosdell (1)
No scoring Third period 14:45 – Jimmy Peters (2)
Mike Karakas Goalie stats Bill Durnan
March 24 Montreal Canadiens 8–2 Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
Toe Blake (2) – 12:42
Buddy O'Connor (1) – pp – 14:07
First period 15:06 – Max Bentley (1)
18:17 – ppClint Smith (2)
Buddy O'Connor (2) – 04:09
Ken Mosdell (2) – 09:31
Murph Chamberlain (1) – 15:36
Second period No scoring
Toe Blake (3) – 09:40
Maurice Richard (3) – 10:36
Bob Fillion (2) – 14:34
Third period No scoring
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Mike Karakas
March 26 Montreal Canadiens 7–2 Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
Toe Blake (4) – pp – 06:04
Maurice Richard (4) – pp – 12:01
First period 11:26 – Bill Mosienko (2)
Toe Blake (5) – 10:54
Murph Chamberlain (2) – sh – 18:05
Second period 10:27 – Red Hamill (1)
Elmer Lach (2) – 09:55
Toe Blake (6) – pp – 17:33
Ken Reardon (1) – 18:42
Third period No scoring
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Mike Karakas
March 19 Detroit Red Wings 1–3 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 03:11 – shPat Egan (1)
19:05 – Bill Shill (1)
Harry Watson (1) – 07:51 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 11:43 – Bep Guidolin (1)
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 21 Detroit Red Wings 3–0 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Pat Lundy (1) – 07:32
Jim Conacher (1) – 12:58
First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
Harry Watson (2) – 19:22 Third period No scoring
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 24 Boston Bruins 5–2 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Milt Schmidt (1) – 02:50 First period No scoring
Woody Dumart (1) – 04:51 Second period No scoring
Pat Egan (2) – 00:25
Milt Schmidt (2) – 01:51
Woody Dumart (2) – 11:10
Third period 12:42 – Fern Gauthier (1)
13:25 – Carl Liscombe (1)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Harry Lumley
March 26 Boston Bruins 4–1 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Bobby Bauer (1) – 02:08
Woody Dumart (3) – 14:54
First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
Bep Guidolin (2) – 04:08
Terry Reardon (1) – 11:30
Third period 11:00 – Fern Gauthier (2)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Harry Lumley
March 28 Detroit Red Wings 3–4 OT Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 07:04 – Bep Guidolin (3)
14:03 – ppBobby Bauer (2)
Fern Gauthier (3) – 11:00 Second period No scoring
Adam Brown (1) – 12:55
Eddie Bruneteau (1) – 19:13
Third period 04:24 – Terry Reardon (2)
No scoring First overtime period 09:51 – Don Gallinger (1)
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 30 Boston Bruins 3–4 OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Bep Guidolin (4) – 05:09
Woody Dumart (4) – 08:02
Second period 00:21 – ppButch Bouchard (1)
03:19 – Bob Fillion (3)
Jack Crawford (1) – 14:04 Third period 16:23 – Murph Chamberlain (3)
No scoring First overtime period 09:08 – Maurice Richard (5)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 2 Boston Bruins 2–3 OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Pat Egan (3) – 10:55 First period 01:06 – Elmer Lach (3)
Bobby Bauer (3) – 03:04 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 10:10 – Butch Bouchard (2)
No scoring First overtime period 16:55 – Jimmy Peters (3)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 4 Montreal Canadiens 4–2 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Elmer Lach (4) – 10:14
Glen Harmon (1) – pp – 14:13
First period 11:01 – Bep Guidolin (5)
No scoring Second period 18:41 – Terry Reardon (3)
Ken Mosdell (3) – 02:45
Dutch Hiller (3) – 05:18
Third period No scoring
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 7 Montreal Canadiens 2–3 OT Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Maurice Richard (6) – 13:46 Second period 08:05 – Murray Henderson (1)
Maurice Richard (7) – 04:04 Third period 03:01 – Don Gallinger (2)
No scoring First overtime period 15:13 – Terry Reardon (4)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 9 Boston Bruins 3–6 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Bill Cowley (1) – p – 05:42
Bobby Bauer (4) – 14:01
First period 09:55 – Bob Fillion (4)
15:51 – Elmer Lach (5)
18:28 – Ken Mosdell (4)
Milt Schmidt (3) – 07:15 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 11:06 – Toe Blake (7)
14:05 – Murph Chamberlain (4)
17:13 – Dutch Hiller (4)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
1945–46 NHL season
Teams
See also
1910s
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

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