1943 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1943 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1943 college football season. The Irish, coached by Frank Leahy, ended the season with 9 wins and 1 loss, winning the national championship.[1] The 1943 team became the fourth Irish team to win the national title and the first for Frank Leahy. Led by Notre Dame's first Heisman Trophy winner, Angelo Bertelli, Notre Dame beat seven teams ranked in the top 13 and played seven of its ten games on the road.[2] Despite a season ending loss to Great Lakes, Notre Dame was awarded its first national title by the Associated Press.[3]

1943 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football
National champion
ConferenceIndependent
Ranking
APNo. 1
1943 record9–1
Head coachFrank Leahy (3rd season)
Offensive schemeT formation
CaptainPat Filley
Home stadiumNotre Dame Stadium (c. 59,075, grass)

Schedule

DateOpponentRankSiteResultAttendance
September 25at PittsburghW 41–043,437
October 2Georgia TechW 55–1326,497
October 9at No. 2 MichiganNo. 1W 35–1286,408
October 16at WisconsinNo. 1W 51–016,235
October 23IllinoisNo. 1
  • Notre Dame Stadium
  • Notre Dame, IN
W 47–024,676
October 30vs. No. 3 NavyNo. 1W 33–677,900
November 6vs. No. 3 ArmyNo. 1W 26–075,121
November 13at No. 8 NorthwesternNo. 1W 25–649,124
November 20No. 2 Iowa Pre-FlightNo. 1
  • Notre Dame Stadium
  • Notre Dame, IN
W 14–1339,446
November 27at Great Lakes NavyNo. 1L 14–1923,000

Awards and honors

All-Americans

Name AP UP INS COL AA SN L
Angelo Bertelli, QB 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
Creighton Miller, HB 1 1 1 1 1
John Yonakor, E 1 1 1 1
Jim White, T 1 1 1 1 1 1 2
Pat Filley, G 2 1 1
Herb Coleman, C 2
denotes consensus selection      Source:[1]

References

  1. ^ a b "2007 Notre Dame Media Guide: History and Records (pages 131-175)". und.cstv.com. Retrieved 2009-01-01.
  2. ^ "2007 Notre Dame Media Guide: 2007 Supplement (page 163)". und.cstv.com. Retrieved 2008-12-31.
  3. ^ "Past Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (Division I FBS) National Champions (formerly called Division I-A)". ncaa.org. Archived from the original on May 9, 2008. Retrieved 2009-01-01.
  4. ^ "Heisman Voting". und.cstv.com. Archived from the original on 2008-12-17. Retrieved 2009-01-01.
Chick Maggioli

Achille Fred "Chick" Maggioli (May 17, 1922 – December 20, 2012) was an American football defensive back and halfback in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions and the Baltimore Colts. He also played in the All-America Football Conference for the Buffalo Bills.

Born in Mishawaka, Indiana, Maggioli was an all-state football player at Mishawaka High School, graduating in 1941. He then attended and played college football at Indiana University in 1942. He joined the Marine Corps Officer Training Program in 1943, which transferred him to the University of Notre Dame, where he played football in 1943 and 1944. At Notre Dame, he was the reserve halfback on Coach Frank Leahy's National Champion 1943_Notre_Dame_Fighting_Irish_football_team and a starting halfback in '44. Called to active duty before the end of the '44 season, he served in the Marine Corps and was awarded the Purple Heart at the Battle of Okinawa. Returning from World War II, Maggioli played halfback on the 1946 University of Illinois Big 10 Conference Championship team and Illinois' 1947 Rose Bowl winning team, graduating from the school that May.

Maggioli was drafted in the eleventh round by the Washington Redskins and ultimately played for the Buffalo Bills as a two-way player in 1948, his team winning the Eastern Division of the AAFL. He played defensive back for the Detroit Lions in 1949 and with the Baltimore Colts in 1950, intercepting eight passes in the final year of his pro football career.

He is a member of both the Indiana Football and Mishawaka High School Athletic halls-of-fame.

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