1941–42 NHL season

The 1941–42 NHL season was the 25th season of the National Hockey League. Seven teams played 48 games each. The Toronto Maple Leafs would win the Stanley Cup defeating the Detroit Red Wings winning four straight after losing the first three in a best-of-seven series, a feat only repeated three times in NHL history (1975, 2010, 2014) and once in Major League Baseball (2004) as of 2017.

1941–42 NHL season
LeagueNational Hockey League
SportIce hockey
DurationNovember 1, 1941 – April 18, 1942
Number of games48
Number of teams7
Regular season
Season championNew York Rangers
Season MVPTommy Anderson (Americans)
Top scorerBryan Hextall (Rangers)
Stanley Cup
ChampionsToronto Maple Leafs
  Runners-upDetroit Red Wings

League business

This season was the last season for the Brooklyn Americans who had changed their name from the New York Americans in an attempt to build a civic relationship with those from Flatbush area of New York.

Regular season

The Americans started the season without Harvey "Busher" Jackson who refused to sign. He was then sold to Boston. But the Amerks had two positive notes: two defencemen, Tommy Anderson and Pat Egan, were now All-Star calibre. That did not prevent them from finishing last, though. On December 9, 1941, the Chicago Black Hawks-Boston Bruins game would be delayed for over a half-hour as United States President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared that the United States was at war.[1]

Frank Patrick suffered a heart attack and had to sell his interest in the Montreal Canadiens, and the Habs almost had to move to Cleveland. But Tommy Gorman kept the team alive. They added Emile "Butch" Bouchard to start his great career on defence and another very good player, Buddy O'Connor, at centre. Montreal had goaltending problems as Bert Gardiner slumped, and rookie Paul Bibeault replaced him. He showed flashes of brilliance, but his inexperience showed. Joe Benoit starred with 20 goals, the first Canadien to do that since 1938–39, when Toe Blake did it.

The New York Rangers had a new goaltender as Sugar Jim Henry replaced the retired Dave Kerr. Henry was one of the reasons the Rangers finished first, something they would not again do for the next 50 years.

Final standings

National Hockey League
GP W L T Pts GF GA
New York Rangers 48 29 17 2 60 177 143
Toronto Maple Leafs 48 27 18 3 57 158 136
Boston Bruins 48 25 17 6 56 160 118
Chicago Black Hawks 48 22 23 3 47 145 155
Detroit Red Wings 48 19 25 4 42 140 147
Montreal Canadiens 48 18 27 3 39 134 173
Brooklyn Americans 48 16 29 3 35 133 175

[2]

Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against
       Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold.

Playoffs

Playoff bracket

  Quarterfinals Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
                           
       
  1 New York 2  
    2 Toronto 4  
     
         
    2 Toronto 4
  5 Detroit 3
  3 Boston 2  
4 Chicago 1  
3 Boston 0
    5 Detroit 2  
5 Detroit 2
  6 Montreal 1  

Quarterfinals

(3) Boston Bruins vs. (4) Chicago Black Hawks

Boston won series 2–1

(5) Detroit Red Wings vs. (6) Montreal Canadiens

Detroit won series 2–1

Semifinals

(1) New York Rangers vs. (2) Toronto Maple Leafs

Toronto won series 4–2

(3) Boston Bruins vs. (5) Detroit Red Wings

Detroit won series 2–0

Stanley Cup Finals

Toronto won series 4–3

Awards

Award winners
Calder Trophy:
(Best first-year player)
Grant Warwick, New York Rangers
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Tommy Anderson, Brooklyn Americans
Lady Byng Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Syl Apps, Toronto Maple Leafs
O'Brien Cup:
(Stanley Cup runner-up)
Detroit Red Wings
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(Regular season champion)
New York Rangers
Vezina Trophy:
(Fewest goals allowed)
Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins
All-Star teams
First team   Position   Second team
Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins G Turk Broda, Toronto Maple Leafs
Earl Seibert, Chicago Black Hawks D Pat Egan, Brooklyn Americans
Tommy Anderson, Brooklyn Americans D Bucko McDonald, Toronto Maple Leafs
Syl Apps, Toronto Maple Leafs C Phil Watson, New York Rangers
Bryan Hextall, New York Rangers RW Gordie Drillon, Toronto Maple Leafs
Lynn Patrick, New York Rangers LW Sid Abel, Detroit Red Wings
Frank Boucher, New York Rangers Coach Paul Thompson, Chicago Black Hawks

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

PLAYER TEAM GP G A PTS PIM
Bryan Hextall New York Rangers 48 24 32 56 30
Lynn Patrick New York Rangers 47 32 22 54 18
Don Grosso Detroit Red Wings 45 23 30 53 13
Phil Watson New York Rangers 48 15 37 52 58
Sid Abel Detroit Red Wings 48 18 31 49 45
Toe Blake Montreal Canadiens 48 17 28 45 29
Bill Thoms Chicago Black Hawks 47 15 30 45 8
Gordie Drillon Toronto Maple Leafs 48 23 18 41 6
Syl Apps Toronto Maple Leafs 38 18 23 41 0
Tommy Anderson Brooklyn Americans 48 12 29 41 64

Source: NHL[3]

Leading goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; Mins – Minutes Played; GA = Goals against; GAA = Goals against average; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts

Player Team GP Min GA GAA W L T SO
Frank Brimsek Boston Bruins 47 2930 115 2.35 24 17 6 3
Turk Broda Toronto Maple Leafs 48 2960 136 2.76 27 18 3 6
Jim Henry New York Rangers 48 2960 143 2.90 29 17 2 1
Johnny Mowers Detroit Red Wings 47 2880 144 3.00 19 25 3 5
Sam LoPresti Chicago Black Hawks 47 2860 152 3.19 21 23 3 3
Paul Bibeault Montreal Canadiens 38 2380 131 3.30 17 19 2 1
Chuck Rayner Brooklyn Americans 36 2380 129 3.47 13 21 2 1
Earl Robertson Brooklyn Americans 12 750 46 3.68 3 8 1 0
Bert Gardiner Montreal Canadiens 10 620 42 4.06 1 8 1 0

Coaches

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1941–42 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1941–42 (listed with their last team):

See also

References

  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X.
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5.
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9.
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1973). The Story of the National Hockey League. New York, NY: Pagurian Press. ISBN 0-684-13424-1.
Notes
  1. ^ Hockey's Book of Firsts, p.71, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN 978-1-57215-037-9
  2. ^ Standings: NHL Public Relations Department (2008). Dave McCarthy; et al., eds. THE NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Official Guide & Record Book/2009. National Hockey League. p. 148. ISBN 978-1-894801-14-0.
  3. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 148.

External links

1941–42 Boston Bruins season

The 1941–42 season is the Boston Bruins's 18th season. They placed third in the National Hockey League.

1941–42 Brooklyn Americans season

The 1941–42 Brooklyn Americans season was the 17th and final season of the Americans NHL franchise. After the season, the Americans franchise was suspended. Although there were several plans to restart the franchise after the Second World War, none came to be.

1941–42 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1941–42 Chicago Black Hawks season was the team's 16th season in the NHL, and they were coming off a 5th-place finish in the 7 team league in 1940–41, and losing in the 2nd round of the playoffs against the Detroit Red Wings after defeating the Montreal Canadiens in the opening round.

The Black Hawks would finish just under .500, as they had a 22–23–3 record, good for 47 points and 4th place in the standings. Chicago would score 145 goals, 4th in the league, and let in 155, which was the 3rd highest. They had a very solid 15–8–1 home record, but would struggle on the road, getting only 7 victories. On December 9, 1941, the Chicago Blackhawks-Boston Bruins game would be delayed for over a half-hour as United States President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared that America was at war.Bill Thoms would set a team record by finishing the year with 45 points, which was the 6th highest point total in the league, and his 30 assists also broke a Black Hawks record. Red Hamill would score a team high 18 goals in only 34 games with Chicago, as he came to the Hawks in a mid-season trade with the Boston Bruins. Along with his 6 goals in Boston, his 24 goals would be tied for the 2nd most in the NHL. Earl Seibert would once again lead the defense, earning 21 points, while Joe Cooper would finish just behind him with 20 points. John Mariucci led the Black Hawks with 61 penalty minutes.

In goal, Sam LoPresti would appear in 47 games, winning 21 of them and earning 3 shutouts. Bill Dickie would replace LoPresti in a game due to an injury, and he would record the victory.

Chicago would qualify for post-season play for the 3rd straight season, and face a 1st round matchup against the 3rd seeded Boston Bruins in a best of 3 series. The Hawks would drop the opening game in overtime at Chicago Stadium, then would play the next 2 games on the road at the Boston Garden. The Hawks would surprise the Bruins in game 2, with a convincing 4–0 victory, however, Chicago could not repeat their success in game 3, as Boston would hold off the Hawks 3–2 and win the series.

1941–42 Detroit Red Wings season

The 1941–42 Detroit Red Wings season was the 16th season for the Detroit NHL franchise, tenth as the Red Wings.

1941–42 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1941–42 Montreal Canadiens season was the 33rd season in franchise history. The team placed sixth in the regular season to qualify for the playoffs. The Canadiens lost in the quarter-finals against the Detroit Red Wings 2 games to 1.

1941–42 New York Rangers season

The 1941–42 New York Rangers season was the 16th season for the team in the National Hockey League (NHL). In the regular season, New York led the NHL with 60 points, and compiled a 29–17–2 record. The Rangers lost in the NHL semi-finals to the Toronto Maple Leafs, four games to two.

1941–42 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1941–42 Toronto Maple Leafs season was the club's 25th season in the NHL. The Maple Leafs came off a very solid season in 1940–41, finishing with their second highest point total in club history, as they had a 28–14–6 record, earning 62 points, which was two fewer than the 1934–35 team accumulated; however, they lost to the Boston Bruins in the semifinals, extending their Stanley Cup drought to nine seasons.

That drought was broken, however, when the Maple Leafs defeated the Detroit Red Wings in the 1942 Stanley Cup Finals, coming back from a 3–0 series deficit to win the Stanley Cup 4 games to 3. They were the first sports team to come back from 0–3 to win a playoff series 4–3; though it has happened in the postseason four times since then (1975 New York Islanders, 2004 MLB Boston Red Sox, 2010 Philadelphia Flyers and the 2014 Los Angeles Kings), this remains the only time it has happened in the championship round.

1942 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1942 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-seven series between the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Detroit Red Wings. After losing the first three games, the Maple Leafs won the next four to win the series 4–3, winning their fourth Stanley Cup. It was the first Cup Final in history to go seven.

1991–92 New York Rangers season

The 1991–92 New York Rangers season saw the Rangers finish in first place in the Patrick Division with a record of 50 wins, 25 losses, and 5 ties for 105 points. This was the highest points total in the league that season, netting the Rangers the Presidents' Trophy. This season marked the first time since the 1941-42 NHL season that the Rangers were the top team in the NHL. In the playoffs, they defeated their cross-river rivals, the New Jersey Devils, in seven games in the Division Semi-finals before falling to the eventual Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins in six games in the Division Finals.

The 1991–92 season was Mark Messier's first in New York, having arrived from the Edmonton Oilers via trade on October 5, 1991. He scored 35 goals and 72 assists for 107 points, winning his second Hart Memorial Trophy as the league's Most Valuable Player. Rangers defenceman Brian Leetch had a spectacular season, leading all rearguards in the NHL in scoring (22 goals and 80 assists for 102 points) and receiving the James Norris Memorial Trophy as the league's top defenceman. The Rangers, along with the Detroit Red Wings and Pittsburgh Penguins, had five 30-goal scorers. New York was not shut out in any of their 80 regular-season games.

Bill Dickie (ice hockey)

William Rufus Dickie (February 20, 1916 – December 23, 1997) was a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender who played in one National Hockey League game for the Chicago Black Hawks during the 1941–42 NHL season. Dickie replaced Sam LoPresti in a 4-3 victory over the Montreal Canadiens on February 5, 1942.Born in Campbellton, New Brunswick, Dickie played for Campbellton Collegiate in 1932-33. He attended Mount Allison University from 1933-37 where, as a goaltender, he was captain of the Mount Allison Mounties. Dickie played for the Saint John Beavers in Saint John, NB from 1937-39. A chemist by training, Dickie was working for the Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation's steel mill in Sydney, NS at the outbreak of World War II and played for the Sydney Millionaires from 1939-41. Dickie moved to Montreal, QC and played for the Montreal Pats in 1941-42. It was during this season that he was called up to play a single game for the Chicago Black Hawks.

Clare Martin (ice hockey)

George Clarence Martin (February 25, 1922 – September 23, 1980) was a Canadian ice hockey defenceman in the NHL. He was born in Waterloo, Ontario.

Frank Brimsek

Francis Charles "Mr. Zero" Brimsek (September 26, 1915 – November 11, 1998) was an American professional ice hockey goaltender who played ten seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Boston Bruins and Chicago Black Hawks. He won the Calder Memorial Trophy and the Vezina Trophy twice, and he was named to the NHL All-Star Team eight times (twice on the First Team and six times on the Second Team). He was also a member of two Stanley Cup championships (1939 and 1941). At the time of his retirement in 1950, he held the records for most wins and shutouts recorded by an American goaltender; these records stood for 54 years and 61 years respectively. In 1966, he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, the first American goalie to be inducted; and in 1973, he was part of the inaugural class of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame. In 1998, Brimsek was ranked number 67 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players, the highest ranked American goaltender.

List of family relations in the NHL

This is a list of family relations in the National Hockey League. Since the creation of the National Hockey League in 1917, family members have been involved in all aspects of the league. Although most connections are among players, there have been family members involved in coaching and managing as well.

Since 1917, 47 pairs of brothers have played together on the same team; among them, ten have won the Stanley Cup together. Brothers have also squared off against each other five times in the Stanley Cup finals, most recently in 2003. Twenty-six sons have followed in their fathers' footsteps and played for his team. Only once has a father played with his sons, when Gordie Howe played with Mark and Marty for one season with the Hartford Whalers.

The Chicago Blackhawks have seen the most familial connections with 31: twenty sets of brothers, five father-son combinations, three uncle-nephew combinations, and three sets of cousins.

The Sutter family has had the largest number of family members – nine – play, coach and manage in the NHL. The original six brothers (Brent, Brian, Darryl, Duane, Rich, and Ron) and three of their sons (cousins Brandon, Brett, and Brody) result in multiple brother/father-son/uncle-nephew/cousin combinations.

The longest multi-generational family is the direct line of four generations starting with Howie Morenz, father-in-law of Bernie Geoffrion, who fathered Dan Geoffrion, who fathered Blake Geoffrion. All four generations have played for the Montreal Canadiens. Howie's brother-in-law was Montreal and Boston player Billy Coutu.

Below is a list of family relations throughout the NHL as players, head coaches, general managers, and officials. Owners are not included, as inheritance makes these relations more routine.

Names in bold have won the Stanley Cup. Names in italics are members of the Hockey Hall of Fame. An asterisk (*) denotes a current (2018–19 NHL season) NHL player.

New York Americans

The New York Americans, colloquially known as the Amerks, were a professional ice hockey team based in New York City, New York from 1925 to 1942. They were the third expansion team in the history of the National Hockey League (NHL) and the second to play in the United States. The team never won the Stanley Cup, but reached the semifinals twice. While it was the first team in New York City, it was eclipsed by the second, the New York Rangers, which arrived in 1926 under the ownership of the Amerks' landlord, Madison Square Garden. The team operated as the Brooklyn Americans during the 1941–42 season before suspending operations in 1942 due to World War II and long-standing financial difficulties. The demise of the club marked the beginning of the NHL's Original Six era from 1942 to 1967, though the Amerks' franchise was not formally canceled until 1946.

The team's overall regular season record was 255–402–127.

Nick Damore

Nicholas Joseph Damore (July 10, 1916 – April 16, 1969) was a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender who played in one National Hockey League game for the Boston Bruins during the 1941–42 NHL season. On January 25, 1942, Damore replaced regular goalie Frank Brimsek, who was unable to play due a broken nose. The Bruins defeated the Montreal Canadiens 7-3. Brimsek returned for the following game. He died in 1969. He is the brother of Hank D'Amore

Sam LoPresti

Samuel Leo LoPresti (January 30, 1917 – December 11, 1984) was an American ice hockey goaltender. He played several senior and professional seasons between 1937 and 1951, including two seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Chicago Black Hawks. He was named an American Hockey Association (AHA) all-star in 1939–40 and the most valuable player of the United States Hockey League in 1949–50. He is best known for his performance with the Black Hawks on March 4, 1941, when he set an NHL record by facing 83 shots in a regulation game against the Boston Bruins. He was inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame in 1973.

LoPresti left the NHL during the Second World War to join the United States Navy where he served on board the SS Roger B. Taney. The ship was torpedoed during a crossing of the Atlantic Ocean and sunk in 1943; LoPresti was one of 29 sailors who survived 42 days lost at sea in a single lifeboat before being rescued off the coast of Brazil. LoPresti was credited with saving the lives of his shipmates by killing a dolphin with a sheath knife, providing nearly the only food they had during their ordeal.

March 22 Boston Bruins 2–1 OT Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
Roy Conacher (1) – 11:08 First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 18:50 – Max Bentley (1)
Des Smith (1) – 06:51 First overtime period No scoring
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Sam LoPresti
March 24 Chicago Black Hawks 4–0 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Bill Mosienko (1) – 03:57
Alex Kaleta (1) – 10:19
Bill Carse (1) – 10:30
Second period No scoring
George Allen (1) – 06:27 Third period No scoring
Sam LoPresti Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 26 Chicago Black Hawks 2–3 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 18:01 – Gordie Bruce (1)
Max Bentley (2) – 07:09
Bill Mosienko (2) – pp – 15:26
Second period 00:48 – Gordie Bruce (2)
08:15 – Jack McGill (1)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Sam LoPresti Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 22 Montreal Canadiens 1–2 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 11:32 – Don Grosso (1)
Terry Reardon (1) – 09:57 Second period 02:35 – Don Grosso (2)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Paul Bibeault Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
March 24 Detroit Red Wings 0–5 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 12:03 – ppJim Haggarty (1)
No scoring Second period 10:26 – Terry Reardon (2)
17:20 – Butch Bouchard (1)
No scoring Third period 15:41 – Joe Benoit (1)
16:17 – Gerry Heffernan (1)
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Paul Bibeault
March 26 Montreal Canadiens 2–6 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Jim Haggarty (2) – 01:26 Second period 04:21 – Mud Bruneteau (1)
19:37 – Sid Abel (1)
Gerry Heffernan (2) – 19:49 Third period 07:30 – Joe Carveth (1)
11:40 – Mud Bruneteau (2)
13:02 – Carl Liscombe (1)
19:33 – Carl Liscombe (2)
Paul Bibeault Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
March 21 New York Rangers 1–3 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Babe Pratt (1) – 02:26 First period 04:15 – Gordie Drillon (1)
05:33 – Nick Metz (1)
No scoring Second period 14:14 – Syl Apps (1)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Jim Henry Goalie stats Turk Broda
March 22 Toronto Maple Leafs 4–2 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
John McCreedy (1) – 11:41
Gordie Drillon (2) – 19:32
First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
John McCreedy (2) – 04:49
Billy Taylor (1) – 06:15
Third period 01:31 – ppMac Colville (1)
02:22 – pp – Mac Colville (2)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Jim Henry
March 24 Toronto Maple Leafs 0–3 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 02:50 – ppAlex Shibicky (1)
06:10 – Alan Kuntz (1)
No scoring Third period 10:49 – Mac Colville (3)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Jim Henry
March 28 New York Rangers 1–2 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
Bryan Hextall (1) – 17:32 Third period 09:09 – Syl Apps (2)
13:08 – Sweeney Schriner (1)
Jim Henry Goalie stats Turk Broda
March 29 Toronto Maple Leafs 1–3 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period 02:01 – Alex Shibicky (2)
16:07 – Alex Shibicky (3)
No scoring Second period No scoring
Pete Langelle (1) – 18:05 Third period 15:56 – Lynn Patrick (1)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Jim Henry
March 31 New York Rangers 2–3 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period 11:41 – John McCreedy (3)
No scoring Second period 00:50 – Pete Langelle (2)
Phil Watson (1) – 10:31
Alf Pike (1) – pp – 12:18
Third period 19:55 – Nick Metz (2)
Jim Henry Goalie stats Turk Broda
March 29 Detroit Red Wings 6–4 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Mud Bruneteau (3) – 00:19
Eddie Wares (1) – 03:25
Carl Liscombe (3) – 10:49
First period 16:24 – Roy Conacher (2)
Don Grosso (3) – 01:00
Carl Liscombe (4) – 09:20
Second period 05:39 – Jack McGill (2)
Sid Abel (2) – 09:00 Third period 09:15 – Jack McGill (3)
16:04 – Jack McGill (4)
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 31 Boston Bruins 1–3 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Herb Cain (1) – 08:32 First period 03:50 – Joe Carveth (2)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 09:46 – Joe Carveth (3)
19:54 – Don Grosso (4)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
April 4 Detroit Red Wings 3–2 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Don Grosso (5) – 01:38
Sid Abel (3) – 12:30
First period 06:36 – John McCreedy (4)
12:59 – Sweeney Schriner (2)
Don Grosso (6) – 14:11 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 7 Detroit Red Wings 4–2 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Don Grosso (7) – 11:48
Mud Bruneteau (4) – 14:17
First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 11:13 – Sweeney Schriner (3)
Don Grosso (8) – 04:15
Gerry Brown (1) – pp – 10:08
Third period 13:40 – Wally Stanowski (1)
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 9 Toronto Maple Leafs 2–5 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Lorne Carr (1) – 15:36
Lorne Carr (2) – 16:06
First period 18:20 – Gerry Brown (2)
18:40 – Joe Carveth (4)
No scoring Second period 13:12 – Pat McReavy (1)
15:11 – Syd Howe (1)
No scoring Third period 07:11 – Eddie Bush (1)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
April 12 Toronto Maple Leafs 4–3 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Bob Davidson (1) – 13:54
Lorne Carr (3) – 15:20
Second period 01:32 – Mud Bruneteau (5)
09:08 – Sid Abel (4)
Syl Apps (3) – 06:15
Nick Metz (3) – 12:45
Third period 04:18 – Carl Liscombe (5)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
April 14 Detroit Red Wings 3–9 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period 09:29 – ppNick Metz (4)
15:14 – ppWally Stanowski (2)
No scoring Second period 01:59 – Bob Goldham (1)
04:11 – Sweeney Schriner (4)
14:11 – Don Metz (1)
14:28 – Syl Apps (4)
16:44 – sh – Don Metz (2)
Syd Howe (2) – 03:08
Alex Motter (1) – 14:03
Carl Liscombe (6) – pp – 15:45
Third period 05:36 – Don Metz (3)
09:25 – Syl Apps (5)
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 16 Toronto Maple Leafs 3–0 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Don Metz (4) – 00:14 Second period No scoring
Bob Goldham (2) – 13:32
Billy Taylor (2) – 14:04
Third period No scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
April 18 Detroit Red Wings 1–3 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Syd Howe (3) – 01:45 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 07:47 – Sweeney Schriner (5)
09:48 – Pete Langelle (3)
16:17 – Sweeney Schriner (6)
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Turk Broda
1941–42 NHL season
Teams
See also
1910s
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

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