1940–41 NHL season

The 1940–41 NHL season was the 24th season of the National Hockey League (NHL). Seven teams each played 48 games. The Boston Bruins were the Stanley Cup winners as they swept the Detroit Red Wings four games to none in the final series.

1940–41 NHL season
LeagueNational Hockey League
SportIce hockey
DurationNovember 2, 1940 – April 12, 1941
Number of games48
Number of teams7
Regular season
Season championBoston Bruins
Season MVPBill Cowley (Bruins)
Top scorerBill Cowley (Bruins)
Stanley Cup
ChampionsBoston Bruins
  Runners-upDetroit Red Wings

Regular season

The Montreal Canadiens had hit the bottom in 1939–40, and were in financial trouble. Frank Patrick decided to become an investor and governor for the team, and Tommy Gorman was hired as general manager. He hired recently released Toronto coach Dick Irvin to run the team. One of the first things Gorman and Irvin did was scout for players, and the Canadiens came up with Johnny Quilty, Joe Benoit, Elmer Lach and defenceman Ken Reardon. Bert Gardiner would be used in goal, replacing Claude Bourque and Wilf Cude. Murph Chamberlain was bought from Toronto to bolster the offence.

Quilty and Benoit came through, as did Toe Blake, but the Habs had a long way to go, finishing sixth. Quilty won the Calder Trophy as the league's top rookie. In fact, before the season started, Coach Irvin handed a sealed envelope to a reporter of his guess who would win the Calder Trophy, and when the season ended, the reporter opened the envelope: Johnny Quilty was the choice Irvin made.

The Boston Bruins set a record 23 straight unbeaten games en route to a strong first place finish at the end of the schedule. The Rangers, finished fourth after the previous year's Stanley Cup win and Dave Kerr was not up to his usual form in goal.

Final standings

National Hockey League
GP W L T Pts GF GA
Boston Bruins 48 27 8 13 67 168 102
Toronto Maple Leafs 48 28 14 6 62 145 99
Detroit Red Wings 48 21 16 11 53 112 102
New York Rangers 48 21 19 8 50 143 125
Chicago Black Hawks 48 16 25 7 39 112 139
Montreal Canadiens 48 16 26 6 38 121 147
New York Americans 48 8 29 11 27 99 186

[1]

Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against
         Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold.

Playoffs

Playoff bracket

  Quarterfinals Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
                           
       
  1 Boston 4  
    2 Toronto 3  
     
         
    1 Boston 4
  3 Detroit 0
  3 Detroit 2  
4 NY Rangers 1  
3 Detroit 2
    5 Chicago 0  
5 Chicago 2
  6 Montreal 1  

Quarterfinals

(3) Detroit Red Wings vs. (4) New York Rangers

Detroit won series 2–1

(5) Chicago Black Hawks vs. (6) Montreal Canadiens

Chicago won series 2–1

Semifinals

(1) Boston Bruins vs. (2) Toronto Maple Leafs

Boston won series 4–3

(3) Detroit Red Wings vs. (5) Chicago Black Hawks

Detroit won series 2–0

Stanley Cup Finals

Boston won series 4–0

Awards

Calder Trophy:
(Best first-year player)
Johnny Quilty, Montreal Canadiens
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Bill Cowley, Boston Bruins
Lady Byng Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Bobby Bauer, Boston Bruins
O'Brien Cup:
(Stanley Cup runners-up)
Detroit Red Wings
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(Top regular season record)
Boston Bruins
Vezina Trophy:
(Fewest goals allowed)
Turk Broda, Toronto Maple Leafs

All-Star teams

First Team   Position   Second Team
Turk Broda, Toronto Maple Leafs G Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins
Dit Clapper, Boston Bruins D Earl Seibert, Chicago Black Hawks
Wally Stanowski, Toronto Maple Leafs D Ott Heller, New York Rangers
Bill Cowley, Boston Bruins C Syl Apps, Toronto Maple Leafs
Bryan Hextall, New York Rangers RW Bobby Bauer, Boston Bruins
Sweeney Schriner, Toronto Maple Leafs LW Woody Dumart, Boston Bruins
Cooney Weiland, Boston Bruins Coach Dick Irvin, Montreal Canadiens

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

PLAYER TEAM GP G A PTS PIM
Bill Cowley Boston Bruins 46 17 45 62 16
Bryan Hextall New York Rangers 48 26 18 44 16
Gordie Drillon Toronto Maple Leafs 42 23 21 44 2
Syl Apps Toronto Maple Leafs 41 20 24 44 6
Syd Howe Detroit Red Wings 48 20 24 44 8
Lynn Patrick New York Rangers 48 20 24 44 12
Neil Colville New York Rangers 48 14 28 42 28
Eddie Wiseman Boston Bruins 47 16 24 40 10
Bobby Bauer Boston Bruins 48 17 22 39 2
Roy Conacher Boston Bruins 41 24 14 38 7

Source: NHL[2]

Leading goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; Min – Minutes Played; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts

Player Team GP MIN GA GAA W L T SO
Turk Broda Toronto Maple Leafs 48 2970 99 2.00 28 14 6 5
Frank Brimsek Boston Bruins 48 3040 102 2.01 27 8 13 6
Johnny Mowers Detroit Red Wings 48 3040 102 2.01 21 16 11 4
Dave Kerr New York Rangers 48 3010 125 2.49 21 19 8 2
Paul Goodman Chicago Black Hawks 21 1320 55 2.50 7 10 4 2
Bert Gardiner Montreal Canadiens 42 2600 119 2.75 13 23 6 2
Sam LoPresti Chicago Black Hawks 27 1670 84 3.02 9 15 3 1
Chuck Rayner N.Y. Americans 12 773 44 3.42 2 7 3 0
Earl Robertson N.Y. Americans 36 2260 142 3.77 6 22 8 1

Coaches

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1940–41 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1940–41 (listed with their last team):

See also

References

  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X.
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5.
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9.
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1973). The Story of the National Hockey League. New York, NY: Pagurian Press. ISBN 0-684-13424-1.
Notes
  1. ^ Standings: NHL Public Relations Department (2008). Dave McCarthy; et al., eds. THE NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Official Guide & Record Book/2009. National Hockey League. p. 148. ISBN 978-1-894801-14-0.
  2. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 148.

External links

1940–41 Boston Bruins season

The 1940–41 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' 17th season in the National Hockey League, and they were coming off of a successful season in 1939–40, leading the NHL in points for the third season in a row, as they finished with a 31–12–5 record, accumulating 67 points. However, the Bruins lost to the New York Rangers in the NHL semi-finals, ending their chances for a second-straight Stanley Cup. This year, the Bruins repeated as regular-season champs and returned to the Final, and defeated the Detroit Red Wings four games to none to win the organization's third Stanley Cup.

1940–41 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1940–41 Chicago Black Hawks season was the team's 15th season in the NHL, and they were coming off a very good regular season in 1939–40, finishing above .500 for the first time in 4 seasons, however, they were quickly eliminated in 2 games by the Detroit Red Wings in the playoffs.

The Black Hawks would have a rough regular season in 1940–41, slipping to a 16–25–7 record, good for 39 points and 5th place in the NHL, and a 2nd straight playoff berth. The Hawks would score 112 goals, the 2nd fewest in the 7 team league, and they would allow 139 goals, which was the 3rd most.

Bill Thoms would lead the club in scoring with 32 points, while George Allen would get a team high 14 goals, and Doug Bentley would lead the club with 20 assists. Team captain Earl Seibert would anchor the blueline, earning 20 points, while fellow defenceman Joe Cooper had a club high 66 penalty minutes.

In goal, Paul Goodman would start the season, however, after a 7–10–4 start and a 2.50 GAA, he would be replaced by Sam LoPresti. LoPresti would go on to a 9–15–3 record and a GAA of 3.02.

Chicago would play the 6th place team, the Montreal Canadiens in a best of 3 series in the 1st round of the playoffs, and in a close fought series, with all 3 games being decided by a goal, the Black Hawks would defeat the Canadiens and earn a 2nd round matchup against the Detroit Red Wings. The Red Wings, who finished 14 points ahead of Chicago, would sweep the Black Hawks in 2 games, eliminating the Hawks from the playoffs.

1940–41 Detroit Red Wings season

The 1940–41 Detroit Red Wings season was the 15th season for the Detroit NHL franchise, ninth as the Red Wings. The Red Wings made it to the Stanley Cup Final, losing to the Boston Bruins.

1940–41 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1940–41 Montreal Canadiens season was the 32nd season in club history. The team placed sixth in the regular season to qualify for the playoffs. The Canadiens lost in the quarter-finals against Chicago Black Hawks.

1940–41 New York Americans season

The 1940–41 New York Americans season was the Americans' 16th season of play.

1940–41 New York Rangers season

The 1940–41 New York Rangers season was the 15th season for the team in the National Hockey League (NHL). During the regular season, the Rangers finished in fourth place in the NHL with 50 points and qualified for the playoffs. In the first round of the playoffs, New York lost to the Detroit Red Wings, two games to one.

1940–41 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1940–41 Toronto Maple Leafs season was the Toronto franchise's 24th season of play.

1941 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1941 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-seven series between the Boston Bruins and the Detroit Red Wings. Boston would win the series 4–0 to win their third Stanley Cup.

Arch Wilder

Archibald Charles "Archie" Wilder (April 30, 1917 – December 24, 2002) more commonly known as Arch or Archie, was a Canadian professional ice hockey left winger who played in the National Hockey League (NHL). Wilder played 18 games with the Detroit Red Wings during the 1940–41 NHL season, registering two assists and two penalty minutes. Wilder was born in Melville, Saskatchewan.

Frank Brimsek

Francis Charles "Mr. Zero" Brimsek (September 26, 1915 – November 11, 1998) was an American professional ice hockey goaltender who played ten seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Boston Bruins and Chicago Black Hawks. He won the Calder Memorial Trophy and the Vezina Trophy twice, and he was named to the NHL All-Star Team eight times (twice on the First Team and six times on the Second Team). He was also a member of two Stanley Cup championships (1939 and 1941). At the time of his retirement in 1950, he held the records for most wins and shutouts recorded by an American goaltender; these records stood for 54 years and 61 years respectively. In 1966, he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, the first American goalie to be inducted; and in 1973, he was part of the inaugural class of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame. In 1998, Brimsek was ranked number 67 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players, the highest ranked American goaltender.

Jack Adams (ice hockey, born 1920)

John Ellis "Jack" Adams (May 5, 1920 – August 21, 1996) was a professional ice hockey left winger who played one season in the National Hockey League with the Montreal Canadiens. He was born in Calgary, Alberta. He died on August 21, 1996 in Surrey, British Columbia.

List of family relations in the NHL

This is a list of family relations in the National Hockey League. Since the creation of the National Hockey League in 1917, family members have been involved in all aspects of the league. Although most connections are among players, there have been family members involved in coaching and managing as well.

Since 1917, 47 pairs of brothers have played together on the same team; among them, ten have won the Stanley Cup together. Brothers have also squared off against each other five times in the Stanley Cup finals, most recently in 2003. Twenty-six sons have followed in their fathers' footsteps and played for his team. Only once has a father played with his sons, when Gordie Howe played with Mark and Marty for one season with the Hartford Whalers.

The Chicago Blackhawks have seen the most familial connections with 31: twenty sets of brothers, five father-son combinations, three uncle-nephew combinations, and three sets of cousins.

The Sutter family has had the largest number of family members – nine – play, coach and manage in the NHL. The original six brothers (Brent, Brian, Darryl, Duane, Rich, and Ron) and three of their sons (cousins Brandon, Brett, and Brody) result in multiple brother/father-son/uncle-nephew/cousin combinations.

The longest multi-generational family is the direct line of four generations starting with Howie Morenz, father-in-law of Bernie Geoffrion, who fathered Dan Geoffrion, who fathered Blake Geoffrion. All four generations have played for the Montreal Canadiens. Howie's brother-in-law was Montreal and Boston player Billy Coutu.

Below is a list of family relations throughout the NHL as players, head coaches, general managers, and officials. Owners are not included, as inheritance makes these relations more routine.

Names in bold have won the Stanley Cup. Names in italics are members of the Hockey Hall of Fame. An asterisk (*) denotes a current (2018–19 NHL season) NHL player.

Silver Quilty

Sylvester Patrick "Silver" Quilty (February 8, 1891 – December 2, 1976) was a Canadian football player, referee, coach and sport administrator. As a player, he won the Yates Cup in 1907 with the Ottawa Gee-Gees football team, and was credited as the first man to play the flying wing position. He also played with the Ottawa Rough Riders, and the McGill Redmen football team. After his playing career, he became a football referee and officiated the 10th Grey Cup, and also coached the Ottawa Rough Riders. Quilty was later involved in building ice hockey in the Ottawa area, then served as president of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association from 1924 to 1926. He sought to implement uniform playing rules across Canada, and helped bridge disagreements between the provincial hockey associations. He was the father of National Hockey League player Johnny Quilty, was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in 1966, and into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 1975.

Traditions and anecdotes associated with the Stanley Cup

There are many traditions and anecdotes associated with the Stanley Cup. The Stanley Cup is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. It is commonly referred to as simply "The Cup", "The Holy Grail" or facetiously (chiefly by sportswriters) as "Lord Stanley's Mug".Unlike the trophies awarded by the other three major professional sports leagues of North America, a new Stanley Cup is not made annually; the champions keep the Cup until a new champion is crowned. It is also one of only two trophies in professional North American sports which has the name of the winning players, coaches, management, and club staff engraved upon it, the other being the CFL's Grey Cup.It is at the centre of several legends and superstitions. Many of these anecdotes involve the Stanley Cup being mistreated in some way. It is the most-travelled championship trophy in the world.

Turk Broda

Walter Edward "Turk" Broda (Ukrainian: Володимир Брода; May 15, 1914 – October 17, 1972) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player and coach. A goaltender, Broda played his entire career for the Toronto Maple Leafs of the National Hockey League (NHL) between 1935 and 1951, taking a brief hiatus from 1943 to 1946 to fight in the Second World War. After retiring from active play, Broda coached minor league and junior ice hockey teams. In 2017 Broda was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.

March 20 New York Rangers 1–2 OT Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 14:39 – Carl Liscombe (1)
Lynn Patrick (1) – pp – 04:33 Third period No scoring
No scoring First overtime period 12:01 – Gus Giesebrecht (1)
Dave Kerr Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
March 23 Detroit Red Wings 1–3 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period 18:38 – ppBabe Pratt (1)
Don Grosso (1) – 03:02 Second period 11:30 – Alex Shibicky (1)
No scoring Third period 19:31 – Mac Colville (1)
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Dave Kerr
March 25 New York Rangers 2–3 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Kilby MacDonald (1) – 15:25 First period 11:38 – Bill Jennings (1)
19:48 – Jack Stewart (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
Neil Colville (1) – 19:51 Third period 09:39 – ppMud Bruneteau (1)
Dave Kerr Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
March 20 Montreal Canadiens 1–2 Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
Elmer Lach (1) – 08:14 First period 16:21 – George Allen (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 07:57 – Max Bentley (1)
Bert Gardiner Goalie stats Sam LoPresti
March 22 Chicago Black Hawks 3–4 2OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Cully Dahlstrom (1) – pp – 02:33 First period 08:01 – Joe Benoit (1)
14:02 – pp – Joe Benoit (2)
Joe Cooper (1) – 03:13 Second period 10:51 – Joe Benoit (3)
Mush March (1) – 10:13 Third period No scoring
No scoring Second overtime period 14:03 – Charlie Sands (1)
Sam LoPresti Goalie stats Bert Gardiner
March 25 Montreal Canadiens 2–3 Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 14:56 – George Allen (2)
Joe Benoit (4) – 18:37
Ray Getliffe (1) – 18:58
Second period 12:11 – Cully Dahlstrom (2)
No scoring Third period 03:31 – Cully Dahlstrom (3)
Bert Gardiner Goalie stats Sam LoPresti
March 20 Toronto Maple Leafs 0–3 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 15:33 – Flash Hollett (1)
No scoring Third period 18:21 – Terry Reardon (1)
19:24 – Eddie Wiseman (1)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 22 Toronto Maple Leafs 5–3 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 08:13 – Eddie Wiseman (2)
09:47 – Milt Schmidt (1)
Gordie Drillon (1) – 02:33
Reg Hamilton (1) – pp – 07:30
Nick Metz (1) – 15:00
Nick Metz (2) – 15:47
Second period No scoring
Don Metz (1) – 01:44 Third period 04:00 – Eddie Wiseman (3)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 25 Boston Bruins 2–7 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Milt Schmidt (2) – pp – 13:35 First period 18:03 – Sweeney Schriner (1)
Herb Cain (1) – 05:07 Second period 06:59 – Syl Apps (1)
12:46 – ppBucko McDonald (1)
17:36 – pp – Syl Apps (2)
No scoring Third period 05:26 – Sweeney Schriner (2)
16:43 – Syl Apps (3)
17:05 – Nick Metz (3)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Turk Broda
March 27 Boston Bruins 2–1 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Woody Dumart (1) – 07:15 Second period 10:30 – Gordie Drillon (2)
Herb Cain (2) – 08:13 Third period No scoring
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Turk Broda
March 29 Toronto Maple Leafs 2–1 OT Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Lex Chisholm (1) – 04:58 First period 14:16 – Pat McReavy (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Pete Langelle (1) – 17:37 First overtime period No scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 1 Boston Bruins 2–1 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
Bobby Bauer (1) – 10:39
Herb Cain (3) – 12:00
Third period 09:48 – Gordie Drillon (3)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 3 Toronto Maple Leafs 1–2 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Bucko McDonald (2) – 13:28 First period 14:32 – Flash Hollett (2)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 14:17 – Mel Hill (1)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
March 27 Chicago Black Hawks 1–3 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 19:59 – ppSid Abel (1)
No scoring Second period 10:15 – Carl Liscombe (2)
Mush March (2) – 05:15 Third period 15:28 – Joe Fisher (1)
Sam LoPresti Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
March 30 Detroit Red Wings 2–1 OT Chicago Black Hawks Chicago Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Alex Motter (1) – pp – 01:25 Second period 04:02 – ppDoug Bentley (1)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Gus Giesebrecht (2) – 09:52 First overtime period No scoring
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Sam LoPresti
April 6 Detroit Red Wings 2–3 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 13:26 – Eddie Wiseman (4)
No scoring Second period 14:45 – Milt Schmidt (3)
Carl Liscombe (3) – 10:55
Syd Howe (1) – 17:45
Third period 09:16 – Pat McReavy (2)
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 8 Detroit Red Wings 1–2 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
Mud Bruneteau (2) – 02:41 Third period 13:35 – Terry Reardon (2)
17:35 – Roy Conacher (1)
Johnny Mowers Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 10 Boston Bruins 4–2 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Eddie Wiseman (5) – 03:57
Milt Schmidt (4) – 14:07
First period 03:15 – Bill Jennings (2)
07:45 – Sid Abel (2)
Milt Schmidt (5) – 00:59 Second period No scoring
Art Jackson (1) – pp – 17:20 Third period No scoring
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
April 12 Boston Bruins 3–1 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 10:14 – ppCarl Liscombe (4)
Flash Hollett (3) – pp – 07:42
Bobby Bauerpp – 08:43
Eddie Wiseman (6) – 19:32
Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Johnny Mowers
1940–41 NHL season
Teams
See also
1910s
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

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