1939 in comics

Notable events of 1939 in comics. See also List of years in comics.

Events and publications

Year overall

January

February

  • Ace Comics #23 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #9 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #35 - National Allied Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #6 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #24 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Funnies #17 - Comic Favorites, Inc.
  • More Fun Comics #40 - National Periodical Publications

March

  • Ace Comics #24 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #10 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #36 - National Allied Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #7 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #25 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Funnies #18 - Comic Favorites, Inc.
  • More Fun Comics #41 - National Periodical Publications

April

  • Ace Comics #25 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #11 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #37 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #1 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #8 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #26 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Funnies #19 - Comic Favorites, Inc.
  • More Fun Comics #42 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics (1939 series) #1 - National Periodical Publications

May

  • May 20: In Floyd Gottfredson's Mickey Mouse comic strip the villain Phantom Blot makes his debut.
  • Ace Comics #26 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #12 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #38 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #2 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #9 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #27 - National Allied Publications - First appearance of Batman
  • Feature Funnies #20 - Comic Favorites, Inc.
  • More Fun Comics #43 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #2 - National Periodical Publications

June

  • Ace Comics #27 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #13 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #39 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #3 - National Allied Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #10 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #28 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics (previously Feature Funnies) #21 - Quality Comics
  • More Fun Comics #44 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #3 - National Periodical Publications
  • Superman (1939 series) #1, cover dated Summer - National Periodical Publications[1]

July

  • Ace Comics #28 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #14 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #40 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #4 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #11 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #29 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics #22 - Quality Comics
  • More Fun Comics #45 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #4 - National Periodical Publications
  • The Magic Comic #1 - D. C. Thomson & Co.

August

  • Ace Comics #29 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #15 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #41 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #5 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #12 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #30 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics #23 - Quality Comics
  • More Fun Comics #46 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #5 - National Periodical Publications
  • Mystery Men Comics #1 (1939 series) - Fox Feature Syndicate - First appearance of Blue Beetle
  • Smash Comics #1 (1939 series) - Quality Comics

September

  • Newspaper strip Ben Bowyang by Alex Gurney begins publication
  • Ace Comics #30 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #16 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #42 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #6 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Man Comics (1939 series) #5 - Centaur Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #13 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #31 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics #24 - Quality Comics
  • Four Color Series 1 (1939 series) #1 - Dell Publishing
    • First comic-book appearance of Dick Tracy, previously seen in comic strips beginning 1931
  • More Fun Comics #47 - National Periodical Publications
  • Movie Comics #6, last issue - National Periodical Publications
  • Mutt and Jeff (1939 series) #1 - National Periodical Publications
  • Mystery Men Comics #2 - Fox Feature Syndicate
  • Smash Comics #2 - Quality Comics
  • Superman #2, cover dated Fall - National Periodical Publications

October

  • October 15: Dorothy Urfer and Virginia Krausmann's Annibelle ends its run after a decade of publication. [2]
  • October: Russell Keaton's Flyin' Jenny makes its debut. It will run until 1946.
  • Ace Comics #31 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #17 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #43 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #7 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Man Comics #6 - Centaur Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #14 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #32 - National Allied Publications
  • Feature Comics #25 - Quality Comics
  • Four Color Series 1 #2 - Dell Publishing
  • Marvel Comics (becomes Marvel Mystery Comics) (1939 series) #1 - Timely Comics
  • More Fun Comics #48 - National Periodical Publications
  • Mystery Men Comics #3 - Fox Feature Syndicate
  • Smash Comics #3 - Quality Comics

November

  • Ace Comics #32 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #18 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #44 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #8 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Man Comics #7 - Centaur Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #15 - Centaur Publications
  • Blue Beetle #1 - Fox Feature Syndicate
  • Detective Comics #33 - National Allied Publications
  • Double Action Comics #1 — National Allied Publications. Released only in New York City newsstands, Double Action Comics was most likely an “ashcan”, a limited-run publication produced simply to register the title. It had a black-and-white cover,[3] with the contents pulled from Action Comics #2.[4]
  • Feature Comics #26 - Quality Comics
  • More Fun Comics #49 - National Periodical Publications
  • Mystery Men Comics #4 - Fox Feature Syndicate
  • Smash Comics #4 - Quality Comics
  • Superman #3 - National Allied Publications - Winter Issue

December

  • Ace Comics #33 - David McKay Publications
  • Action Comics #19 - National Allied Publications
  • Adventure Comics #45 - National Allied Publications
  • All-American Comics #9 - All-American Publications
  • Amazing Man Comics #8 - Centaur Publications
  • Amazing Mystery Funnies #16 - Centaur Publications
  • Detective Comics #34 - National Allied Publications
  • Double Action Comics (1939 series) #1 - National Periodical Publications (ashcan copy, distributed only in New York City newsstands)
  • Feature Comics #27 - Quality Comics
  • Marvel Mystery Comics (previously Marvel Comics) #2 - Timely Comics
  • More Fun Comics #50 - National Periodical Publications
  • Mystery Men Comics #5 - Fox Feature Syndicate
  • Smash Comics #5 - Quality Comics

Specials

Specific date unknown

  • The first episode of Arthur Warden's Tuffy and his Magic Tail is published. [5]

Deaths

January

  • January 18: Carl E. Schultze, American comics artist (Foxy Grandpa), passes away at age 72. [6]
  • January 20: Victor Bergdahl, Swedish animator and comics artist (Kapten Grogg), dies at age 60. [7][8]

June

  • June 28: Joz De Swerts, Belgian illustrator, political cartoonist and comics artist (worked for Zonneland), dies at age 49. [9]

July

  • July 4: Louis Wain, British painter and illustrator (illustrations starring anthropomorphic cats), dies at age 78. [10]
  • July 25: A.E. Hayward, American comics artist (Somebody's Stenog), passes away at age 55. [11]

August

  • August 14: T.E. Powers, American comics artist (Our Moving Pictures, Mr. Nobody Holme), dies at the age of 69. [12]

September

October

  • October 10: Benjamin Rabier, French comics artist, illustrator, animator and advertising artist (Gédéon, Tintin-Lutin, designed La Vache Qui Rit), passes away at age 74. [14]

November

Specific date unknown

  • E. Nicolson, French illustrator and comics artist (Les Aventures du Chien Brownie, Bambochard et Trémolo), passes away at an unknown age. [16]

First issues by title

Renamed titles

Initial appearances by character name

References

  1. ^ a b Wallace, Daniel; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "1930s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle. Dorling Kindersley. p. 25. ISBN 978-0-7566-6742-9. Superman's runaway popularity as part of Action Comics earned him his own comic. This was a real breakthrough for the time, as characters introduced in comic books had never before been so successful as to warrant their own titles.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  2. ^ Morales, Alisande (July 17, 2013). "Wonder Women: On and Off Paper". Ali's Alley. Alisande Morales-Caraballo. Retrieved July 30, 2016.
  3. ^ One copy with a color cover has been proven to be a hoax.
  4. ^ The first mention of Double Action Comics #1 is in The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide #10 (Robert M. Overstreet, 1980). Additional information regarding Double Action can be found on page A-19 of the market report, which notes that, “four more copies of Double Action turned up and sold for record prices. All of these copies were in excellent condition with white cover and pages. Even a No. 1 was included in the four, the rest being No. 2’s.” The existence of a Very Good copy has been confirmed by both Robert Overstreet and John K. Snyder III.
  5. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/w/warden_arnold.htm
  6. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/s/schultze_carl.htm
  7. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/b/bergdahl_victor.htm
  8. ^ Bendazzi, p. 45
  9. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/d/de-swerts_joz.htm
  10. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/w/wain_louis.htm
  11. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/h/hayward_ae.htm
  12. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/p/powers_te.htm
  13. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/s/smalhout_elie.htm
  14. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/r/rabier_benjamin.htm
  15. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/h/hoban.htm
  16. ^ https://www.lambiek.net/artists/n/nicolson_e.htm
  17. ^ Wallace "1930s" in Dolan, p. 24: "DC's second superstar debuted in the lead story of this issue, written by Bill Finger and drawn by Bob Kane, though the character was missing many of the elements that would make him a legend."
1938 in comics

Notable events of 1938 in comics. See also List of years in comics.

1940 in comics

Notable events of 1940 in comics. See also List of years in comics.

Atlantis (DC Comics)

Atlantis is a fictional aquatic civilization appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The first version of Atlantis within the DC Universe debuted in Action Comics #18 (November 1939), and was conceived by Gardner F. Fox and Fred Guardineer.

Other incarnations of Atlantis appeared in various DC comics in the 1940s and 1950s, including the version in the Superman group of books in which the mermaid Lori Lemaris resides. Aquaman's version of the city, the most prominently featured version in the company's line, first appeared in Adventure Comics #260 (May 1959), and was created by Robert Bernstein and Ramona Fradon. All versions are based on the fictional island of Atlantis first mentioned in Plato's initial dialogue, the Timaeus, written c. 360 BC.

Batman's utility belt

Batman's utility belt is a feature of Batman's costume. Similar belts are used by the various Robins, Batgirl, and other members of the Bat-family.

Borduria

Borduria is a fictional country in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It is located in the Balkans and has a rivalry with the fictional neighbouring country of Syldavia. Borduria is depicted in King Ottokar's Sceptre and The Calculus Affair, and is referred to in Tintin and the Picaros.

Gotham City Police Department

The Gotham City Police Department (GCPD) is a fictional police department appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The GCPD services Gotham City and is typically depicted in stories featuring the superhero Batman.

Khemed

Khemed is a fictional country in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It is an Arab emirate located on the shores of the Red Sea and has been compared to Jordan, with its Emir resembling the Hashemite kings and the character Mull Pasha corresponding to the British General Glubb Pasha.The name means "got it!" in Marols, the Brussels Flemish dialect. The names of many people and places in the country are based on Marols phrases.

Krypton (comics)

Krypton is a fictional planet appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The planet is the native world of Superman and is named after the element Krypton. The planet was created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, and was first referred to in Action Comics #1 (June 1938). The planet made its first full appearance in Superman #1 (summer 1939).

Krypton is also the native world of Supergirl, Krypto the Superdog, and Power Girl (in her case, an alternate-universe version designated "Krypton-Two"). It has been consistently described as having been destroyed shortly after Superman's flight from the planet, although the exact details of its destruction vary by time period and writers. Kryptonians were the dominant species on Krypton.

List of years in comics

This page indexes the individual year in comics pages. Each year is annotated with significant events as reference points.

2010s - 2000s - 1990s - 1980s - 1970s - 1960s - 1950s - 1940s - 1930s -

Pre-1930s

Metropolis (comics)

Metropolis is a fictional city appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, best known as the home of Superman. First appearing by name in Action Comics #16 (Sept. 1939), Metropolis is depicted as a prosperous and massive city in the Northeastern United States, within close proximity to Gotham City.

The co-creator and original artist of Superman, Joe Shuster, modeled the Metropolis skyline after Toronto, where he was born and lived until he was ten. Since then, however, the look and feel of Metropolis has been greatly influenced by New York City.Within the DC Universe, Metropolis is depicted as being one of the largest and wealthiest cities in the world, having a population of 11 million citizens.In addition to Superman, the city is also home to other superheroes, such as Booster Gold and Blue Beetle.

Syldavia

Syldavia is a fictional country in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It is located in the Balkans and has a rivalry with the fictional neighbouring country of Borduria. Syldavia is depicted in King Ottokar's Sceptre, Destination Moon, Tintin and the Lake of Sharks, and The Calculus Affair, and is referred to in Tintin and the Picaros.

The Case of the Chemical Syndicate

"The Case of the Chemical Syndicate" is the featured story in issue #27 of Detective Comics which introduced the popular DC Comics superhero Batman.

The plot has been compared to The Shadow novel Partners of Peril.

Wadesdah

Wadesdah is a fictional city in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Wadesdah is the capital of the fictional country Khemed in the Arabian peninsula, home of the Emir Mohammed Ben Kalish Ezab. The city is situated between the real cities of Jeddah and Aqaba. Wadesdah is depicted in Land of Black Gold and The Red Sea Sharks.

Wayne Manor

Wayne Manor is a fictional American mansion appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. It is the personal residence of Bruce Wayne, who is also the superhero Batman.

The residence is depicted as a large mansion on the outskirts of Gotham City and is maintained by the Wayne family's butler, Alfred Pennyworth. While the earliest stories showed Bruce Wayne buying the house himself, by the 1950s at the latest, retroactive continuity established that the manor had belonged to the Wayne family for several generations. Along with serving as a personal residence, the mansion sits above the Batcave, which Batman uses as his secret headquarters. The vast majority of DC Comics references place Wayne Manor just outside of Gotham City in the state of New Jersey.In the 1960s television series, the narrator refers to the mansion as "stately Wayne Manor". For live-action films, English country house locations in Nottinghamshire, Hertfordshire, and Buckinghamshire, as well as Stevenson Taylor Hall in New York, have been used to depict Wayne Manor.

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