1938 Pulitzer Prize

The following are the Pulitzer Prizes for 1938.

Journalism awards

Letters and Drama Awards

Special Awards and Citations

External links

Ben Grauer

Benjamin Franklin Grauer (June 2, 1908 – May 31, 1977) was a US radio and TV personality, following a career during the 1920s as a child actor in films and on Broadway. He began his career as a child in David Warfield's production of The Return of Peter Grimm. Among his early credits were roles in films directed by D.W. Griffith.

Grauer was born in Staten Island, New York. After graduating from Townsend Harris High School, he received his B.A. from the City College of New York in 1930. Grauer started in radio as an actor but soon became part of the broadcasting staff at the National Broadcasting Company. He was one of the four narrators, along with Burgess Meredith, of NBC's public affairs series The Big Story, which focused on courageous journalists.

In 1954, he married interior designer Melanie Kahane.

Hopwood Award

The Hopwood Awards are a major scholarship program at the University of Michigan, founded by Avery Hopwood.

Under the terms of the will of Avery Hopwood, a prominent American dramatist and member of the Class of 1905 of The University of Michigan, one-fifth of Mr. Hopwood's estate was given to the Regents for the encouragement of creative work in writing. The first awards were made in 1931, and today the Hopwood Program offers approximately $120,000 in prizes every year to aspiring writers at the University of Michigan. According to Nicholas Delbanco, UM English Professor and former Director of the Hopwood Awards Program, "This is the oldest and best known series of writing prizes in the country and it is a very good indicator of future success."

Lake Winnipesaukee

Lake Winnipesaukee () is the largest lake in the U.S. state of New Hampshire, located in the Lakes Region. It is approximately 21 miles (34 km) long (northwest-southeast) and from 1 to 9 miles (1.6 to 14.5 km) wide (northeast-southwest), covering 69 square miles (179 km2)—71 square miles (184 km2) when Paugus Bay is included—with a maximum depth of 180 feet (55 m). The center area of the lake is called The Broads.The lake contains at least 258 islands, half of which are less than a quarter-acre in size, and is indented by several peninsulas, yielding a total shoreline of approximately 288 miles (463 km). The driving distance around the lake is 63 miles (101 km). It is 504 feet (154 m) above sea level. Winnipesaukee is the third-largest lake in New England after Lake Champlain and Moosehead Lake.

Outflow is regulated by the Lakeport Dam in Lakeport, New Hampshire, on the Winnipesaukee River.

List of Finnish Americans

The following is a list of Finnish Americans, including both original immigrants who obtained American citizenship and their American descendants.

To be included in this list, the person must have a Wikipedia article showing they are Finnish American or must have references showing they are Finnish American and are notable.

List of Ohio State University people

This is a list of Ohio State University people. Individuals listed may have only attended the university at one point and not necessarily have graduated. Currently there are nearly 500,000 living Ohio State alumni.

List of female poets

This is a list of female poets organised by the time period in which they were born. This listing is subordered alphabetically by name.

List of people from Knoxville, Tennessee

The following is a list of notable people who have lived in Knoxville, Tennessee. For University of Tennessee students and alumni not otherwise associated with Knoxville, see List of University of Tennessee people.

List of poets

This is an alphabetical list of internationally notable poets.

List of women writers

This is a list of notable women writers.

See also individual lists of women writers by nationality

Marquis James

Marquis James (August 29, 1891, Springfield, Missouri – November 19, 1955) was an American journalist and author, twice awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his works The Raven: A Biography of Sam Houston and The Life of Andrew Jackson.

Marya Zaturenska

Marya Zaturenska (September 12, 1902 – January 19, 1982) was an American lyric poet, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1938.

Odell (given name)

Odell is an English unisex given name which may refer to:

Odell Barnes (criminal) (1968–2000), American murderer

Odell Barnes (entrepreneur) (born 1952), American entrepreneur nicknamed the "Foreclosure King"

Odell Barry (born 1941), American former football player

Odell Beckham Jr. (born 1992), American National Football League player

Odell Brown (1940–2011), American jazz organist

Odell Haggins (born 1967), American college football coach and former National Football League player

Odell Hale (1908–1980), American Major League Baseball player

Odell Manuel, New Zealand former professional rugby league footballer and Australian Powerlifting champion

Odell Pollard (1927–2015), American attorney and politician

Odell Shepard (1884–1967), American professor, poet, and politician, 1938 Pulitzer Prize winner

Odell Thurman (born 1983), American former National Football League player

Odell Waller (1917–1942), African-American sharecropper executed for fatally shooting his white landlord

Odell Willis (born 1984), Canadian Football League player

Odell Shepard

Odell Shepard (July 22, 1884 in Sterling, Illinois – July 19, 1967 in New London, Connecticut) was an American professor, poet, and politician who was the 66th Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut from 1941 to 1943. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1938.

Our Town

Our Town is a 1938 metatheatrical three-act play by American playwright Thornton Wilder. It tells the story of the fictional American small town of Grover's Corners between 1901 and 1913 through the everyday lives of its citizens.

Throughout, Wilder uses metatheatrical devices, setting the play in the actual theatre where it is being performed. The main character is the stage manager of the theatre who directly addresses the audience, brings in guest lecturers, fields questions from the audience, and fills in playing some of the roles. The play is performed without a set on a mostly bare stage. With a few exceptions, the actors mime actions without the use of props.

Our Town was first performed at McCarter Theatre in Princeton, New Jersey in 1938. It later went on to success on Broadway and won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It remains popular today and revivals are frequent.

Paul Herman Buck

Paul Herman Buck (August 25, 1899 in Columbus, Ohio – December 23, 1978 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) was an American historian. He won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1938 and became the first Provost of Harvard University in 1945.

Pulitzer Prize Special Citations and Awards

The Pulitzer Prize jury has the option of awarding special citations and awards where they consider necessary. Since 1918, forty-four such special citations and awards have been given. The awards are sixteen journalism awards, twelve letters awards, fourteen music awards, and five service awards. Prizes for the award vary. The Pulitzer Foundation has stated that the Special Citations given to George Gershwin, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Duke Ellington were in response to criticism for the failure of the Foundation to cite the four.

Robert E. Sherwood

Robert Emmet Sherwood (April 4, 1896 – November 14, 1955) was an American playwright, editor, and screenwriter.

Thornton Wilder

Thornton Niven Wilder (April 17, 1897 – December 7, 1975) was an American playwright and novelist. He won three Pulitzer Prizes—for the novel The Bridge of San Luis Rey, and for the plays Our Town and The Skin of Our Teeth — and a U.S. National Book Award for the novel The Eighth Day.

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