1937 NFL Draft

The 1937 National Football League Draft was the second draft held by the National Football League (NFL). The draft took place December 12, 1936, at the Hotel Lincoln in New York City.[1][2] The draft consisted of 10 rounds, with 100 player selections, two of which would later become members of the Professional Football Hall of Fame. Notable for this draft were the league's draft selections for a planned expansion team, the Cleveland Rams, who were admitted into the league prior to the 1937 season.

1937 NFL Draft
General information
Date(s)December 12, 1936
LocationHotel Lincoln
in New York City
Overview
100 total selections in 10 rounds
LeagueNFL
First selectionSam Francis, RB
Philadelphia Eagles
Mr. IrrelevantSolon Holt, G
Cleveland Rams
Most selections (10)each team selected ten players
Fewest selections (10)each team selected ten players
Hall of Famers2

Player selections

= Hall of Famer

Round one

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
1 Philadelphia Eagles Sam Francis Back Nebraska
2 Brooklyn Dodgers Ed Goddard Back Washington State
3 Chicago Cardinals Ray "Buzz" Buivid Quarterback Marquette
4 New York Giants Ed Widseth Back Minnesota
5 Pittsburgh Pirates Mike Basrak Center Duquesne
6 Boston Redskins Sammy Baugh Quarterback Texas Christian
7 Detroit Lions Lloyd Cardwell Back Nebraska
8 Chicago Bears Les McDonald End Nebraska
9 Green Bay Packers Eddie Jankowski Back Wisconsin
10 Cleveland Rams John "Zero" Drake Tackle Purdue

Round two

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
11 Philadelphia Eagles Franny Murray Back Pennsylvania
12 Chicago Cardinals Gaynell Tinsley End LSU
13 Brooklyn Dodgers Clarence "Ace" Parker Back Duke
14 New York Giants Arthur "Tarzan" White Back Alabama
15 Pittsburgh Pirates Bob Finley Guard Southern Methodist
16 Boston Redskins Nello Falaschi Center Santa Clara
17 Detroit Lions Charley Hamrick Tackle Ohio State
18 Chicago Bears Marvin Stewart Back LSU
19 Green Bay Packers Ave Daniell Running back Pittsburgh
20 Cleveland Rams Jules Alfonse Tackle Minnesota

Round three

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
21 Philadelphia Eagles Drew Ellis Tackle Texas Christian
22 Brooklyn Dodgers Max Starcevich Back Washington
23 Chicago Cardinals Arthur Guepe Back Marquette
24 New York Giants Jerry Dennerlein Center St. Mary's (CA)
25 Pittsburgh Pirates Bill Breeden End Oklahoma
26 Boston Redskins Maurice Elder Back Kansas State
27 Detroit Lions Vern Huffman End Indiana
28 Chicago Bears Dick Plasman Back Vanderbilt
29 Green Bay Packers Charles "Bud" Wilkinson End Minnesota
30 Cleveland Rams Bobby Larue Tackle Pittsburgh

Round four

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
31 Philadelphia Eagles Walt Gilbert Back Auburn
32 Chicago Cardinals H.K. "Bucky" Bryan Guard Tulane
33 Brooklyn Dodgers Bill Kurlish Tackle Pennsylvania
34 New York Giants Ward Cuff End Marquette
35 Pittsburgh Pirates Elmo "Bo" Hewes End Oklahoma
36 Boston Redskins Dick Bassi End Santa Clara
37 Detroit Lions Bill Glassford Back Pittsburgh
38 Chicago Bears Henry Hammond Back Southwestern (KS)
39 Green Bay Packers Earl "Bud" Svendsen End Minnesota
40 Cleveland Rams John Wiatrak Center Washington

Round five

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
41 Philadelphia Eagles Alex Drobnitch Back Denver
42 Brooklyn Dodgers Bert Johnson Tackle Kentucky
43 Chicago Cardinals Ham Harmon Center Tulsa
44 New York Giants Mickey Kobrosky Quarterback Trinity (CT)
45 Pittsburgh Pirates Jack Frye End Missouri
46 Boston Redskins Chuck Bond Tackle Washington
47 Detroit Lions Maury Patt Center Carnegie-Mellon
48 Chicago Bears Bill "Red" Conkright Center Oklahoma
49 Green Bay Packers Dewitt Gibson Guard Northwestern
50 Cleveland Rams Inwood Smith Tackle Ohio State

Round six

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
51 Philadelphia Eagles Bill Guckeyson Back Maryland
52 Chicago Cardinals Phil Dickens Tackle Tennessee
53 Brooklyn Dodgers John Golemgeske Tackle Wisconsin
54 New York Giants Jim Farley Back Virginia Military Institute
55 Pittsburgh Pirates Walt Roach Back Texas Christian
56 Boston Redskins Jimmie Cain End Washington
57 Detroit Lions George Bell Tackle Purdue
58 Chicago Bears Del Bjork Back Oregon
59 Green Bay Packers Merle Wendt Tackle Ohio State
60 Cleveland Rams Chris Del Sasso Tackle Indiana

Round seven

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
61 Philadelphia Eagles Herb Barna Guard West Virginia
62 Brooklyn Dodgers Fred Funk Back UCLA
63 Chicago Cardinals Herm Dickerson End Virginia Tech
64 New York Giants Jim Poole Back Mississippi
65 Pittsburgh Pirates Byron Haines Back Washington
66 Boston Redskins Rolla Holland Guard Kansas State
67 Detroit Lions John Sprague Back Southern Methodist
68 Chicago Bears J.W. "Buck" Friedman Tackle Rice
69 Green Bay Packers Marv Baldwin Tackle Texas Christian
70 Cleveland Rams Norm Schoen Tackle Baldwin–Wallace

Round eight

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
71 Philadelphia Eagles Nestor Hennon Back Carnegie-Mellon
72 Chicago Cardinals John Reynolds Center Baylor
73 Brooklyn Dodgers Steve Reid Tackle Northwestern
74 New York Giants Gene Meyers Back Kentucky
75 Pittsburgh Pirates Marty Kordick End St. Mary's (CA)
76 Boston Redskins Joel Eaves End Auburn
77 Detroit Lions Elvin Sayre Back Illinois
78 Chicago Bears Steve Toth Center Northwestern
79 Green Bay Packers Les Chapman Back Tulsa
80 Cleveland Rams Herm Schmarr Tackle Catholic University

Round nine

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
81 Philadelphia Eagles Paul Fanning Back Kansas State
82 Brooklyn Dodgers Ed Nowogrowski Back University of Washington
83 Chicago Cardinals Dwight Hafeli Back Washington (St. Louis)
84 New York Giants Dwight Scheyer End Washington State
85 Pittsburgh Pirates Matt Patanelli Tackle Michigan
86 Boston Redskins Bill Docherty Guard Temple
87 Detroit Lions Larry Kelley [3] Guard Yale
88 Chicago Bears Al Guepe End Marquette
89 Green Bay Packers Gordon Dahlgren Guard Michigan State
90 Cleveland Rams Ray Johnson Tackle Denver

Round ten

Pick # NFL Team Player Position College
91 Philadelphia Eagles Ray Antil Back Minnesota
92 Chicago Cardinals Middleton Fitzsimmons Guard Georgia Tech
93 Brooklyn Dodgers Gil Kuhn Back USC
94 New York Giants Chuck Gelatka End Mississippi State
95 Pittsburgh Pirates Stan Nevers Tackle Kentucky
96 Boston Redskins Dom "Mac" Cara Guard North Carolina State
97 Detroit Lions Kay Bell Guard Washington State
98 Chicago Bears Ed (Red) Wade End Utah State
99 Green Bay Packers Dave Gavin Guard Holy Cross
100 [4] Cleveland Rams Solon Holt Tackle Texas Christian
= Hall of Famer

Hall of Famers

  • Sammy Baugh, quarterback from Texas Christian University taken 1st Round 6th Overall by the Boston Redskins.
Inducted: Professional Football Hall of Fame class of 1963.[5]
  • Clarence "Ace" Parker, back from Duke University taken 2nd Round 13th Overall by the Brooklyn Dodgers.
Inducted: Professional Football Hall of Fame class of 1972.[6]

Notable undrafted players

= Pro Bowler [7]
Original NFL team Player Pos. College Conf. Notes
Chicago Bears George Wilson  E Northwestern Big Ten
Cleveland Rams Chuck Cherundolo  C/LB Penn State Ind.
New York Giants Hank Soar  RB/LB Providence Ind.
New York Giants Bill Walls  E TCU SWC

References

  1. ^ "NFL Draft Locations". www.footballgeography.com. 2014-10-02. Archived from the original on 2015-09-05. Retrieved 2014-10-23.
  2. ^ Salomone, Dan (October 2, 2014). "NFL Draft headed to Chicago in 2015". Giants.com. New York Giants. Archived from the original on 2015-09-30. Retrieved June 3, 2015.
  3. ^ Larry Kelley, 1936 Heisman Trophy winner "Heisman Trophy". Archived from the original on 7 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-04.
  4. ^ This last selection is commonly referred to as Mr. Irrelevant.
  5. ^ "Pro Football Hall of Fame". Archived from the original on 2008-07-31. Retrieved 2008-10-05.
  6. ^ "Pro Football Hall of Fame". Archived from the original on 2008-07-31. Retrieved 2008-10-05.
  7. ^ Players are identified as a Pro Bowler if they were selected for the Pro Bowl at any time in their career.

External links

1936 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1936 Big Ten Conference football season was the 41st season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1936 college football season.

The 1936 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Bernie Bierman, compiled a 7–1 record and was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll, giving Minnesota its third consecutive national championship. Tackle Ed Widseth was a consensus first-team All-American and was the first Big Ten player taken in the 1937 NFL Draft with the fourth overall pick.

The 1936 Northwestern Wildcats football team, under head coach Pappy Waldorf, compiled a 7–1 record, won the Big Ten championship, and was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll. The team's only loss came on the last day of the season against Notre Dame. Guard Steve Reid was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1936 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Francis Schmidt, compiled a 5–3 record, led the Big Ten in scoring defense (3.4 points allowed per game), and outscored opponents 160 to 27. End Merle Wendt, tackle Charley Hamrick, and guard Inwood Smith were first-team All-Big Ten players.

1936 TCU Horned Frogs football team

The 1936 TCU Horned Frogs football team represented Texas Christian University (TCU) in the 1936 college football season. The team was coached by Dutch Meyer in his third year as coach, finishing the season 9–2–2 (4–1–1 SWC). Led by senior quarterback Sammy Baugh, the offense scored 160 points, while the defense allowed 58 points. The Frogs defeated Marquette in the inaugural Cotton Bowl Classic, played in Dallas.

The final AP poll was released in late November and TCU was sixteenth; they then defeated #6 Santa Clara on December 12, and #20 Marquette on New Year's Day. Baugh was a first round selection in the 1937 NFL Draft, taken sixth overall by the Boston Redskins, who moved south to Washington, D.C. prior to the 1937 season.

1937 Pittsburgh Pirates (NFL) season

The 1937 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the team's fifth season as a professional sports club in the National Football League (NFL). The team hired John McNally as head coach after John Bach stepped down during the offseason. McNally was a former player, who played halfback for the Pirates during the 1934 season. His team finished with another 4-7 record however, McNally was welcomed back the next season.

1937 Washington Redskins season

The 1937 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 6th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their first in Washington, D.C..

The Boston Redskins moved to Washington after their runner-up 1936 season and become the Washington Redskins. In 1937 they repeated as Eastern Division champions and played the NFL championship game on the road against the Chicago Bears at Wrigley Field. The Redskins won the championship game, 28–21.

The Boston Redskins had won the Eastern Division title the previous season, but had poor attendance, prompting the owner George Preston Marshall to move south to his hometown. The Redskins selected quarterback Sammy Baugh from TCU in the first round of the 1937 NFL draft, on December 12, 1936, while still in Boston. Rookie Baugh led the league in passing in 1937 with a then-record 81 pass completions, and halfback Cliff Battles led the NFL in rushing with 874 yards.

Art White

Arthur Pershing "Tarzan" White (December 6, 1915 – January 23, 1996) was an American football offensive lineman in the National Football League for the New York Giants and Chicago Cardinals. He played college football at the University of Alabama and was drafted in the second round of the 1937 NFL Draft.

Charley Hamrick

Charley Hamrick was the 17th pick in the 1937 NFL Draft. He was drafted in the 2nd round by the Detroit Lions. He went to college at Ohio State University. He was the 3rd Buckeye to be drafted to the NFL.

Chuck Bond

Charles Eishmel Bond (January 5, 1914 – September 24, 1989) was an American football offensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins. He played college football at the University of Washington and was drafted in the fifth round of the 1937 NFL Draft.

Chuck Gelatka

Charles T. Gelatka (January 28, 1914 – May 23, 2001) was an American football end who played four seasons with the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the New York Giants in the tenth round of the 1937 NFL Draft. He played college football at Mississippi State University and attended Francis W. Parker School in Chicago, Illinois. Gelatka was a member of the New York Giants team that won the 1938 NFL Championship. He served in the United States Armed Forces during World War II.

Dick Bassi

Richard Joseph Bassi (January 1, 1915 – August 12, 1973) was an American football offensive lineman in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins, Chicago Bears, Philadelphia Eagles, and the Pittsburgh Steelers. He also played for the San Francisco 49ers of the All-America Football Conference. Bassi played college football at the University of Santa Clara and was drafted in the fourth round of the 1937 NFL Draft.

Dwight Hafeli

Dwight L. Hafeli (September 1, 1912 – July 17, 1983) was an American football and basketball player and coach. He was selected by the Chicago Cardinals in the 1937 NFL Draft. He served as the head football coach and basketball coach at Kenyon College in Ohio. Hafeli was also the head basketball coach at the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy—now known as Missouri University of Science and Technology—from 1942 to 1949.

Ed Goddard

Edwin Vinson Goddard (October 28, 1914 – July 20, 1992) was an American football player. Goddard played college football at the quarterback and halfback positions for Washington State University. Goddard also served as a punter for Washington State. He was named a first-team All-American quarterback three straight years from 1934–1937 and was a consensus All-American quarterback in 1935 and 1936. He was the second player selected in the 1937 NFL Draft and played two years of professional football for the Brooklyn Dodgers (1937) and Cleveland Rams (1937–1938).

Goddard was known as the "Escondido Express," as he grew up in Escondido, California. He reportedly received the nickname from a Los Angeles Times reporter who saw him running and passing against USC, helping Washington State win against USC for the first time in three years.

During World War II, Goddard served in the military. He and his wife, Ellen Goddard, had two children. Goddard died at his home in July 1992 at age 77.

Ed Widseth

Edwin Clarence Widseth (January 5, 1910 – December 3, 1998) was an American professional football player who was a tackle for the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL) for four seasons. He played college football for the Minnesota Golden Gophers football team of the University of Minnesota, where he was a consensus All-American in 1935 and 1936. Widseth was drafted by the New York Giants in the first round of the 1937 NFL Draft, and was chosen for the pro Bowl in 1938. He was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Jim Lee Howell

James Lee Howell (September 27, 1914 – January 4, 1995) was an American football player and coach for the National Football League's New York Giants. Howell was born in Arkansas and played college football and basketball at the University of Arkansas. He was drafted by the Giants in the 1937 NFL Draft and played wide receiver and defensive back from 1937 to 1947. While playing for the Giants, He was elected to the Arkansas House of Representatives representing Lonoke County in 1940 and served one term during the January to March 1941 session of the legislature. After his playing career ended, he was head coach for Wagner College football.

Howell returned to the Giants in 1954 as head coach, succeeding fan, media and player favorite Steve Owen. Howell quickly hired Vince Lombardi as his offensive coordinator and shortly after converted Tom Landry from player to defensive coordinator. From 1954 to 1960, the Giants played in three NFL Championship Games, defeating George Halas’s Chicago Bears in 1956 by the score of 47–7.

During Howell's seven seasons as head coach, he earned a career 53–27–4 record, with a .663 winning percentage. He drafted and coached a roster of stars including six future Pro Football Hall of Famers, Sam Huff, Andy Robustelli, Rosey Brown, Emlen Tunnell, Frank Gifford and Don Maynard. Although his conservative, defense-oriented style was unpopular with the fans and media, the Giants' success on the field was more satisfying. Several other players from this era went on to become head coaches and broadcasters.

Howell played and coached in an era when football went from a relatively simple game to one of great complexity with schemes, formations and playbooks designed to deceive as much as over power. With future Hall of Famers Lombardi and Landry as coordinators, Howell's job was frequently to play the diplomat within his own team.

Howell stayed with the team as Director of Player Personnel until his retirement in 1981. He died on January 4, 1995 in Lonoke, Arkansas.

The Professional Football Researchers Association named Howell to the PRFA Hall of Very Good Class of 2007

Johnny Drake

John William "Zero" Drake (March 27, 1916 – March 26, 1973) was an American football player. He was the first round pick (10th overall) by the Cleveland Rams, their first ever draft pick, in the 1937 NFL Draft. A Purdue Boilermakers running back, he led the NFL in touchdowns in the 1939 & 1940 seasons.

Jules Alfonse

Julius "Jules" P. Alfonse (October 12, 1911 – May 21, 2000) was an American football fullback/halfback in the National Football League. He was a 2nd round selection (20th overall pick) by the Cleveland Rams out of Minnesota in the 1937 NFL Draft.

He died in 2000.

Les McDonald

Lester Bruce McDonald (September 19, 1914 – July 26, 1971) was an American football end in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions, and the Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at the University of Nebraska and was drafted in the first round with the eighth overall pick of the 1937 NFL Draft.

Max Starcevich

Max Starcevich (October 19, 1911 – August 9, 1990) was an All-American American football guard. Though selected in the 1937 NFL Draft, Starcevich did not play in the National Football League. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1990. Max Starcevich is of Croat origin.

Ray Johnson (American football)

Raymond Robert Johnson (October 16, 1914 – August 20, 1990) was an American football defensive back who played three seasons in the National Football League with the Cleveland Rams and Chicago Cardinals. He was drafted by the Cleveland Rams in the ninth round of the 1937 NFL Draft. He played college football at the University of Denver and attended Wheat Ridge High School in Wheat Ridge, Colorado.

Ward Cuff

Ward Lloyd Cuff (August 12, 1913 – December 24, 2002) was an American football halfback and placekicker in the National Football League (NFL) for the New York Giants, Chicago Cardinals, and Green Bay Packers. He played college football at Marquette University and was drafted in the fourth round of the 1937 NFL Draft.

As a fullback at Marquette, Cuff played in the first Cotton Bowl game, in 1937, losing to TCU. He was also Marquette's heavyweight boxing champion and held the school record in the javelin throw. Cuff played for the Giants from 1937 to 1945, won the NFL championship in 1938, and became the team's career scoring leader with 319 points before being traded to the Cardinals. He played one season with the Cardinals and one with the Packers. He led the NFL in field goals made four times. After his NFL career, Cuff coached high school football in Green Bay, was an assistant coach for the Oregon State Beavers football team, and later worked for The Boeing Company.His number 14 was retired by the Giants, although owner Wellington Mara gave Y. A. Tittle permission to wear it during his time with the Giants from 1961 to 1964. It was retired again in honor of both players.

Early era (1936–1959)
AFL and NFL era (1960–1966)
Common draft (1967–1969)
Modern era (1970–present)
Expansion drafts
Others
See also

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