1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the fourth playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 7, 1936, at National League Park in Boston, Massachusetts, the home of the Boston Bees of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 4–3. It was the National League's first win in All-Star Game history.

1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 7 1
National League 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 X 4 9 0
DateJuly 7, 1936
VenueNational League Park
CityBoston, Massachusetts
Managers
Attendance25,556
Ceremonial first pitchNone
RadioMutual, CBS, NBC
Radio announcersFred Hoey, Linus Travers (Mutual)
Arch McDonald, Dolly Stark (CBS)
Hal Totten, Tom Manning, Graham McNamee (NBC)

Rosters

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

American League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Lefty Grove Red Sox 4
C Rick Ferrell Red Sox 4
1B Lou Gehrig Yankees 4
2B Charlie Gehringer Tigers 3
3B Pinky Higgins Athletics 2
SS Luke Appling White Sox 1
LF Rip Radcliff White Sox 1
CF Earl Averill Indians 4
RF Joe DiMaggio Yankees 1
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Tommy Bridges[1] Tigers 3
P Lefty Gomez Yankees 4
P Mel Harder Indians 3
P Vern Kennedy White Sox 1
P Monte Pearson Yankees 1
P Schoolboy Rowe Tigers 2
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Rollie Hemsley Browns 2
C Bill Dickey Yankees 3
1B Jimmie Foxx Red Sox 4
SS Frankie Crosetti Yankees 1
SS Joe Cronin Red Sox 4
OF Ben Chapman Senators 4
OF Goose Goslin Tigers 1
OF George Selkirk Yankees 1

National League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Dizzy Dean Cardinals 3
C Gabby Hartnett Cubs 4
1B Ripper Collins Cardinals 2
2B Billy Herman Cubs 3
3B Pinky Whitney Phillies 1
SS Leo Durocher Cardinals 1
LF Joe Medwick Cardinals 3
CF Augie Galan Cubs 1
RF Frank Demaree Cubs 1
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Curt Davis Cubs 1
P Carl Hubbell Giants 4
P Van Mungo Dodgers 2
P Lon Warneke Cubs 3
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Ernie Lombardi Reds 1
1B Gus Suhr Pirates 1
2B Stu Martin Cardinals 1
3B Lew Riggs Reds 1
SS Arky Vaughan Pirates 3
OF Wally Berger Bees 4
OF Jo-Jo Moore Giants 3
OF Mel Ott Giants 3

Game

Umpires

Position Umpire League
Home Plate Beans Reardon National
First Base Bill Summers American
Second Base Bill Stewart National
Third Base Lou Kolls American

The umpires rotated positions clockwise in the middle of the fifth inning, with Summers moving behind the plate.[2]

Starting lineups

American League National League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Luke Appling White Sox SS 1 Augie Galan Cubs CF
2 Charlie Gehringer Tigers 2B 2 Billy Herman Cubs 2B
3 Joe DiMaggio Yankees RF 3 Ripper Collins Cardinals 1B
4 Lou Gehrig Yankees 1B 4 Joe Medwick Cardinals LF
5 Earl Averill Indians CF 5 Frank Demaree Cubs RF
6 Rick Ferrell Red Sox C 6 Gabby Hartnett Cubs C
7 Rip Radcliff White Sox LF 7 Pinky Whitney Phillies 3B
8 Pinky Higgins Athletics 3B 8 Leo Durocher Cardinals SS
9 Lefty Grove Red Sox P 9 Dizzy Dean Cardinals P

Game summary

Tuesday, July 7, 1936 1:30 pm (ET) at National League Park in Boston, Massachusetts
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 7 1
National League 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 - 4 9 0
WP: Dizzy Dean (1–0)   LP: Lefty Grove (0–1)   Sv: Lon Warneke (1)
Home runs:
AL: Lou Gehrig (1)
NL: Augie Galan (1)

Joe DiMaggio became the first rookie to play in an All-Star Game; he was hitless in five-at-bats and made an error in right field.

References

  1. ^ Player declined or was unable to play.
  2. ^ "National League 4, American League 3". Retrosheet. July 7, 1936. Retrieved October 23, 2016.

External links

1936 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1936 Brooklyn Dodgers fired manager Casey Stengel after another dismal campaign, which saw the team finish in 6th place.

1936 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1936 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 55th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; the 50th in the National League. The Pirates finished fourth in the league standings with a record of 84–70.

1937 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1937 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the fifth playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 7, 1937, at Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C., the home of the Washington Senators of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 8–3.

The game, watched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, is remembered because of a play in which Earl Averill of the Indians hit a ball that struck pitcher Dizzy Dean on the toe, breaking it. Complications of this injury shortened the career of the future Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher.

Braves Field

Braves Field was a baseball park located in Boston, Massachusetts. Today the site is home to Nickerson Field on the campus of Boston University. The stadium was home of the Boston Braves of the National League from 1915–1952, prior to the Braves' move to Milwaukee in 1953. The stadium hosted the 1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game and Braves home games during the 1948 World Series. The Boston Red Sox used Braves Field for their home games in the 1915 and 1916 World Series since the stadium had a larger seating capacity than Fenway Park. Braves Field was the site of Babe Ruth's final season, playing for the Braves in 1935. From 1929 to 1932, the Boston Red Sox played select regular season games periodically at Braves Field. On May 1, 1920, Braves Field hosted the longest major league baseball game in history – 26 innings, which eventually ended in a 1–1 tie.Braves Field was also home to multiple professional football teams between 1929 and 1948, including the first home of the National Football League (NFL) franchise that became the Washington Redskins. The pro football Braves played at the ballpark in their inaugural season of 1932, then were at Fenway Park for four seasons as the Boston Redskins before the move south in 1937 to Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C.

Located on Commonwealth Avenue at Babcock Street, the baseball field was aligned northeast, much as Fenway Park has been since it opened in April 1912. Most of the stadium was demolished in 1955, but significant portions of the original structure still stand and make up part of the Nickerson Field sports complex on the campus of Boston University.

Fred Hoey

Fred Hoey (1885 – November 17, 1949) was a major league baseball broadcaster. Hoey called games for the Boston Braves from 1925–38 and Boston Red Sox from 1927-38.

Hoey was born in Boston, but raised in Saxonville, Massachusetts. At the age of 12, Hoey saw his first baseball game during the 1897 Temple Cup. Hoey would later play semipro baseball and work as an usher at the Huntington Avenue Grounds.In 1903, Hoey was hired as a sportswriter, writing about high school sports, baseball, and hockey. In 1924, he became the first publicity director of the Boston Bruins. Hoey began broadcasting Braves games in 1925 and Red Sox games in 1927, becoming the first full-time announcer for both teams.

In 1933, Hoey was hired by CBS Radio to call Games 1 and 5 of the World Series after commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis declared that Ted Husing and Graham McNamee could not call World Series games because they did not call any regular season games. Hoey was removed from the CBS broadcasting booth during the fourth inning of game one after his voice went out. Although reported as a cold, Hoey's garbled and incoherent words led many to think that Hoey was drunk. After this incident, Hoey never went to the broadcast booth without a tin of throat lozenges. His only other national assignment was calling the 1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, played in Boston, for Mutual.

After the 1936 season, Hoey was fired by the head of the Yankee Network, John Shepard III. Baseball fans, including Franklin D. Roosevelt rallied to his defense. After the 1938 season, Hoey demanded a raise, but the sponsors, despite public pressure, replaced Hoey with former player and manager Frankie Frisch. After leaving the booth, Hoey covered the Red Sox and Braves in Boston newspapers until 1946.Hoey died in Winthrop, Massachusetts, on November 17, 1949, of accidental gas asphyxiation.

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