1936–37 NHL season

The 1936–37 NHL season was the 20th season of the National Hockey League (NHL). Eight teams each played 48 games. The Detroit Red Wings were the Stanley Cup winners as they beat the New York Rangers three games to two in the final series.

1936–37 NHL season
LeagueNational Hockey League
SportIce hockey
DurationNovember 5, 1936 – April 15, 1937
Number of games48
Number of teams8
Regular season
Season championsDetroit Red Wings
Season MVPBabe Siebert (Canadiens)
Top scorerSweeney Schriner (Americans)
Canadian Division championsMontreal Canadiens
American Division championsDetroit Red Wings
Stanley Cup
ChampionsDetroit Red Wings
  Runners-upNew York Rangers

League business

Frank Calder had been naming the top rookies commencing with 1932–33. This year, he commenced buying a trophy for the top rookie and Syl Apps was this year's winner.

The Great Depression continued to take its toll on the NHL. At the beginning of the decade there were ten teams and in the years since two teams had folded. It appeared like the New York Americans were to become the third team but the NHL took steps to prevent that from happening. Instead of letting the team cease operating because of money and ownership problems the league assumed control of the team for the 1936–37 season. It was then that team owner Bill Dwyer sued. A settlement then allowed for Dwyer to own the team, run by the NHL, and that Dwyer would be given a chance to pay back his debts.

The Montreal Maroons, short of money, had to sell their star and team captain Hooley Smith to Boston. It was hoped that Carl Voss of the former Eagles would fill in adequately for him, but he came down with influenza and was not much help. However, Bob Gracie started scoring and the Maroons almost nipped the Canadiens for first place in the Canadian Division.

Regular season

Highlights

The New York Americans had started in first place, but then their players came down with influenza and the team went downhill. But the worst blow was when Roy Worters suffered a hernia and had to retire. Alfie Moore and Lorne Chabot were not adequate replacements and the Amerks finished last in the Canadian Division.

On November 16, 1936, Hal Winkler made his NHL debut for the New York Rangers and gained a 1–0 shutout over the Montreal Maroons. He was the first goaltender to have a shutout in his NHL debut.[1] The Montreal Canadiens had hit the bottom in 1935–36, and Babe Siebert was obtained to shore up the defence. But the most loved of all movements was buying Howie Morenz back from the Rangers. The Canadiens went from last to first in the Canadian Division. Morenz was just hitting his stride in January 1937, when tragedy struck. On one of his hurtling rushes, he was being checked by Earl Seibert of Chicago when his left skate got caught in the dasher of the end boards, and Morenz suffered a badly fractured leg. After suffering a nervous breakdown worrying about if he would be able to come back, more bad luck occurred. On March 8, 1937, X-rays revealed that Howie had blood clots in his healing leg. An operation was scheduled for the next day, but when Howie ate a light supper and told the nurse he wanted to rest, in falling asleep his pallor suddenly changed and the nurse knew something was wrong. A blood clot had stopped his heart, and attempts to revive Howie failed. News of Morenz's death shocked the hockey world, and thousands filed past his bier, many in tears, to pay their last respects.

Beyond Morenz's tragic mishap, it was an injury-filled year for many stars. Already suffering from a bad back, Boston's Eddie Shore suffered a broken vertebra that cost him the remainder of the season. Charlie Conacher of the Maple Leafs repeatedly injured his wrist, costing him much of the season, and was never the same player thereafter. A series of minor injuries precipitated Lionel Conacher's decision to retire at year's end, while Sylvio Mantha and Roy Worters suffered career-ending injuries. Other stars who missed several weeks of time or had season-ending injuries included Red Wings captain Doug Young, Larry Aurie, Russ Blinco, Buzz Boll, Pit Lepine, Dave Trottier, Toe Blake and Art Chapman.

With five games left to play, Chicago owner Frederic McLaughlin, a partisan of American-born players, decided to field an all-American lineup, the first time in major senior hockey that this was done. With incumbent Mike Karakas in goal, the Black Hawks signed Ernest Klingbeil and Paul Schaefer on defense, with a line of Milt Brink centering Al Suomi and Bun Laprairie. The team went 1–3 with the sextet in the lineup.

Detroit, led by Vezina Trophy winning Normie Smith, finished first in the American Division.

Final standings

American Division
GP W L T GF GA PTS
Detroit Red Wings 48 25 14 9 128 102 59
Boston Bruins 48 23 18 7 120 110 53
New York Rangers 48 19 20 9 117 106 47
Chicago Black Hawks 48 14 27 7 99 131 35
Canadian Division
GP W L T GF GA Pts
Montreal Canadiens 48 24 18 6 115 111 54
Montreal Maroons 48 22 17 9 126 110 53
Toronto Maple Leafs 48 22 21 5 119 115 49
New York Americans 48 15 29 4 122 161 34

Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, GF = Goals For, GA = Goals Against, Pts = Points
       Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold.

Playoffs

Playoff bracket

  Quarterfinals Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
                           
     
  C1 Mtl Canadiens 2  
    A1 Detroit 3  
   
       
    A1 Detroit 3
  A3 NY Rangers 2
  C2 Mtl Maroons 2  
A2 Boston 1  
C2 Mtl Maroons 0
    A3 NY Rangers 2  
C3 Toronto 0
  A3 NY Rangers 2  

Quarterfinals

(A2) Boston Bruins vs. (C2) Montreal Maroons

Montreal won series 2–1

(C3) Toronto Maple Leafs vs. (A3) New York Rangers

New York won series 2–0

Semifinals

(A1) Detroit Red Wings vs. (C1) Montreal Canadiens

Detroit won series 3–2

(C2) Montreal Maroons vs. (A3) New York Rangers

New York won series 2–0

Stanley Cup Finals

Detroit won series 3–2

Awards

The "Rookie of the Year" award now had a trophy, the Calder Trophy, for the first time.

Calder Trophy:
(Best first-year player)
Syl Apps, Toronto Maple Leafs
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Babe Siebert, Montreal Canadiens
Lady Byng Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Marty Barry, Detroit Red Wings
O'Brien Cup:
(Canadian Division champion)
Montreal Canadiens
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(American Division champion)
Detroit Red Wings
Vezina Trophy:
(Fewest goals allowed)
Normie Smith, Detroit Red Wings

All-Star teams

First Team   Position   Second Team
Normie Smith, Detroit Red Wings G Wilf Cude, Montreal Canadiens
Babe Siebert, Montreal Canadiens D Earl Seibert, Chicago Black Hawks
Ebbie Goodfellow, Detroit Red Wings D Lionel Conacher, Montreal Maroons
Marty Barry, Detroit Red Wings C Art Chapman, New York Americans
Larry Aurie, Detroit Red Wings RW Cecil Dillon, New York Rangers
Busher Jackson, Toronto Maple Leafs LW Sweeney Schriner, New York Americans
Jack Adams, Detroit Red Wings Coach Cecil Hart, Montreal Canadiens

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

PLAYER TEAM GP G A PTS PIM
Sweeney Schriner New York Americans 48 21 25 46 17
Syl Apps Toronto Maple Leafs 48 16 29 45 10
Marty Barry Detroit Red Wings 48 17 27 44 6
Larry Aurie Detroit Red Wings 45 23 20 43 20
Busher Jackson Toronto Maple Leafs 46 21 19 40 12
Johnny Gagnon Montreal Canadiens 48 20 16 36 38
Bob Gracie Montreal Maroons 47 11 25 36 18
Nels Stewart Boston Bruins/New York Americans 43 23 12 35 37
Paul Thompson Chicago Black Hawks 47 17 18 35 28
Bill Cowley Boston Bruins 46 13 22 35 4

Source: NHL.[2]

Leading goaltenders

Coaches

American Division

Canadian Division

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1936–37 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1936–37 (listed with their last team):

See also

References

  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X.
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5.
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9.
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1973). The Story of the National Hockey League. New York, NY: Pagurian Press. ISBN 0-684-13424-1.
Notes
  1. ^ Hockey's Book of Firsts, p.19, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN 978-1-57215-037-9
  2. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 147.

External links

1936–37 Boston Bruins season

The 1936–37 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' 13th season in the NHL.

1936–37 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1936–37 Chicago Black Hawks season was the team's 11th season in the NHL, and they were coming off a quick playoff exit, as the Hawks lost to the underdog New York Americans in the 1st round of the 1936 playoffs. The Black Hawks would then have their worst season since 1928–29, as the team finished with only 35 points with a 14–27–7 record, and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1932–33. Chicago scored an NHL low 99 goals, and gave up 131 goals, the 2nd highest total in the league.

Paul Thompson would lead the Hawks offensively, scoring a club high in goals (17) and points (35). Team captain Johnny Gottselig had a team high 21 assists. Pep Kelly, who the Hawks acquired in a trade with the Toronto Maple Leafs midway through the season, scored 13 goals in 29 games with Chicago after scoring only 2 goals in 16 games with the Leafs. Defenseman Earl Seibert led all defensemen with 9 goals and 15 points, and had a team high 46 penalty minutes.

In goal, Mike Karakas would get all the action, winning 14 games, earning 5 shutouts, and posting a 2.64 GAA.

The Black Hawks would fail to qualify for the playoffs for the first time since 1933, as they finished in the cellar of the American Division, 12 points behind the 3rd place New York Rangers.

1936–37 Detroit Red Wings season

The 1936–37 Detroit Red Wings season was the 11th season for the Detroit NHL franchise, fifth as the Red Wings. The season involved winning the Stanley Cup.

1936–37 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1936–37 Montreal Canadiens season was the team's 28th season of play. After coach Cecil Hart and Howie Morenz returned to the club, the Canadiens placed first in the Canadian Division and qualified for the playoffs. Montreal met and lost to eventual Stanley Cup champion Detroit Red Wings in the semi-finals.

1936–37 Montreal Maroons season

The 1936–37 Montreal Maroons season was the 13th season of the NHL team. The team qualified for the playoffs and defeated the Boston Bruins in the first round, before losing to the New York Rangers in the second round.

1936–37 New York Americans season

The 1936–37 New York Americans season was the Americans' 12th season of play. After qualifying for the playoffs in 1936, the Americans again placed last in the Canadian Division to miss qualifying for the playoffs. The Americans had now failed to qualify in ten of the franchise's twelve seasons in New York.

1936–37 New York Rangers season

The 1936–37 New York Rangers season was the 11th season for the team in the National Hockey League. During the regular season, the Rangers posted a third-place finish in the American Division, with a 19–20–9 record. New York qualified for the Stanley Cup playoffs, where the team defeated the Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Maroons to reach the Stanley Cup Finals. In the Cup Finals, the Rangers lost to the Detroit Red Wings, three games to two.

1936–37 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1936–37 Toronto Maple Leafs season was the 20th season of play for the Toronto NHL franchise, tenth as the Maple Leafs.

1937 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1937 Stanley Cup Finals was contested by the defending champion Detroit Red Wings and the New York Rangers in their fifth Final series appearance. Detroit would win the series 3–2 to win their second and second-straight Stanley Cup.

Al Suomi

Albert William Suomi (October 29, 1913 – September 23, 2014) was an American NHL player, who played with the Chicago Black Hawks for the 1936–37 NHL season. Although he did not aspire to play at a professional level, Suomi nevertheless spent his young life playing hockey and was eventually scouted while playing with friends. Suomi began his career playing for the Chicago Baby Ruth team in 1934, a marketing ploy started by the company that produced the candy of the same name. In 1936, he joined a minor league team in Detroit, Michigan and, based on his experiences with the Chicago Baby Ruth team, was deemed too professional to be eligible for the 1936 United States Olympic ice hockey team.

Suomi's sole season with the National Hockey League came as a result of another marketing ploy, this time on the part of the Chicago Black Hawks. Having benched all of his Canadian players, the manager declared his intent to field a team composed entirely of American players. Suomi was selected from among a pool of novice players to join the team but, after five games, the gimmick was disbanded and replaced with professionals. Retiring from hockey in 1940, he took on a series of small jobs before opening his own hardware store in Chicago. As of 2007, Suomi was the last surviving member of the 1936–37 all-American Chicago Black Hawks team and, following the 2010 death of Louis Holmes, the oldest living former NHL player. He is also believed to be the first former NHL player to reach the age of 100.

Alex Wood (ice hockey)

Alexander Mann Jerome Wood (January 10, 1909 – April 4, 1979) was a professional ice hockey goaltender who played in one National Hockey League game for the New York Americans during the 1936–37 NHL season.

Calder Memorial Trophy

The Calder Memorial Trophy is an annual award given "to the player selected as the most proficient in his first year of competition in the National Hockey League (NHL)." It is named after Frank Calder, the first president of the NHL. Serving as the NHL's Rookie of the Year award, this version of the trophy has been awarded since its creation for the 1936–37 NHL season. The voting is conducted by members of the Professional Hockey Writers' Association at the conclusion of each regular season to determine the winner.

George Brown (ice hockey)

George Allen Brown (May 17, 1912 – January 23, 1972) was a Canadian professional ice hockey centre. He was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

George Parsons (ice hockey)

George Henry Parsons (June 28, 1914 – June 30, 1998) was a professional ice hockey left winger who played 64 games with the Toronto Maple Leafs. Parsons suffered a career-ending eye injury in 1939, forcing him to retire from the National Hockey League. Parsons later became involved with CCM hockey and the development of hockey helmets and facial protection. The George Parsons Trophy is given annually to the player judged to be the most sportsmanlike at the Memorial Cup tournament.

Gord Reid

Gordon Joseph Reid (February 19, 1910 – November 12, 1994) was a professional ice hockey defenceman who played in one National Hockey League game for the New York Americans during the 1936–37 NHL season. He died at a hospital in Bracebridge, Ontario in 1994 and was buried alongside his wife, Audrey at the Bracebridge Municipal Cemetery.

List of family relations in the NHL

This is a list of family relations in the National Hockey League. Since the creation of the National Hockey League in 1917, family members have been involved in all aspects of the league. Although most connections are among players, there have been family members involved in coaching and managing as well.

Since 1917, 47 pairs of brothers have played together on the same team; among them, ten have won the Stanley Cup together. Brothers have also squared off against each other five times in the Stanley Cup finals, most recently in 2003. Twenty-six sons have followed in their fathers' footsteps and played for his team. Only once has a father played with his sons, when Gordie Howe played with Mark and Marty for one season with the Hartford Whalers.

The Chicago Blackhawks have seen the most familial connections with 31: twenty sets of brothers, five father-son combinations, three uncle-nephew combinations, and three sets of cousins.

The Sutter family has had the largest number of family members – nine – play, coach and manage in the NHL. The original six brothers (Brent, Brian, Darryl, Duane, Rich, and Ron) and three of their sons (cousins Brandon, Brett, and Brody) result in multiple brother/father-son/uncle-nephew/cousin combinations.

The longest multi-generational family is the direct line of four generations starting with Howie Morenz, father-in-law of Bernie Geoffrion, who fathered Dan Geoffrion, who fathered Blake Geoffrion. All four generations have played for the Montreal Canadiens. Howie's brother-in-law was Montreal and Boston player Billy Coutu.

Below is a list of family relations throughout the NHL as players, head coaches, general managers, and officials. Owners are not included, as inheritance makes these relations more routine.

Names in bold have won the Stanley Cup. Names in italics are members of the Hockey Hall of Fame. An asterisk (*) denotes a current (2018–19 NHL season) NHL player.

Murray Murdoch

John Murray Murdoch (May 19, 1904 – May 17, 2001) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player and coach.

Murdoch was born in Lucknow, Ontario and raised in Edgerton, Alberta. His parents were Walter Dryden Murdoch (b. 1875) and Jennie Bell "Jane" Murray (b. 1878). He received a Bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Manitoba where he played hockey from 1921 to 1924. He played left wing for the New York Rangers in 508 games with 84 goals and 108 assists from the Rangers' first season in the 1926–27 NHL season until the 1936–37 NHL season. From 1938 to 1965, he was the sixth head coach of Yale University hockey team. In 1974, he was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy for his contribution to hockey in the United States.

Sylvio Mantha

Joseph Sylvio Theobald Mantha (April 14, 1902 – August 7, 1974) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player who played fourteen seasons in the National Hockey League for the Montreal Canadiens and Boston Bruins.

Three stars (ice hockey)

The three stars (French: trois étoiles) in ice hockey are the three best players in a game as chosen by a third party, with the first star considered the best of the three players, akin to the Player of the match in other sports. Usually, the top point scorers or outstanding goaltenders are designated the three stars, but other players may be considered by affecting the game by other means (e.g. consistent physical play, many steals, blocked shots, etc.).

March 23 Boston Bruins 1–4 Montreal Maroons Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 13:56 – Carl Voss (1)
No scoring Second period 12:15 – ppBaldy Northcott (1)
Ray Getliffe (1) – pp – 06:34 Third period 16:43 – Herb Cain (1)
17:32 – Bob Gracie (1)
Tiny Thompson Goalie stats Bill Beveridge
March 25 Montreal Maroons 0–4 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 04:54 – Dit Clapper (1)
15:42 – Charlie Sands (1)
No scoring Second period 16:19 – Ray Getliffe (2)
No scoring Third period 13:50 – Red Beattie (1)
Bill Beveridge Goalie stats Tiny Thompson
March 28 Montreal Maroons 4–1 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Cy Wentworth (1) – 15:49
Russ Blinco (1) – 19:25
Second period 05:18 – Dit Clapper (2)
Earl Robinson (1) – 14:30
Dave Trottier (1) – 17:58
Third period No scoring
Bill Beveridge Goalie stats Tiny Thompson
March 23 New York Rangers 3–0 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Lynn Patrick (1) – pp – 05:29 Second period No scoring
Murray Murdoch (1) – 15:07
Alex Shibicky (1) – 16:10
Third period No scoring
Dave Kerr Goalie stats Turk Broda
March 25 Toronto Maple Leafs 1–2 OT New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
Busher Jackson (1) – 01:42 First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 10:05 – Butch Keeling (1)
No scoring First overtime period 13:05 – Babe Pratt (1)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Dave Kerr
March 23 Montreal Canadiens 0–4 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 05:21 – Ebbie Goodfellow (1)
No scoring Second period 16:54 – Herbie Lewis (1)
No scoring Third period 01:20 – Hec Kilrea (1)
17:52 – Hec Kilrea (2)
Wilf Cude Goalie stats Norm Smith
March 25 Montreal Canadiens 1–5 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Paul Haynes (1) – 09:29 First period 15:42 – Mud Bruneteau (1)
No scoring Second period 02:07 – Herbie Lewis (2)
04:45 – Herbie Lewis (3)
15:40 – Pete Kelly (1)
No scoring Third period 17:15 – Pete Kelly (2)
Wilf Cude Goalie stats Norm Smith
March 27 Detroit Red Wings 1–3 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 03:10 – Johnny Gagnon (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
Marty Barry (1) – 01:45 Third period 10:29 – Babe Siebert (1)
17:27 – Johnny Gagnon (2)
Norm Smith Goalie stats Wilf Cude
March 30 Detroit Red Wings 1–3 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Syd Howe (1) – 17:00 First period 07:30 – Toe Blake (1)
12:27 – Paul Haynes (2)
No scoring Second period 18:28 – Joffre Desilets (1)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Norm Smith Goalie stats Wilf Cude
April 1 Detroit Red Wings 2–1 OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Ebbie Goodfellow (2) – sh – 04:41 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 14:56 – Bill MacKenzie (1)
Hec Kilrea (3) – 11:49 First overtime period No scoring
Norm Smith Goalie stats Wilf Cude
April 1 Montreal Maroons 0–1 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period 16:46 – Babe Pratt (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Bill Beveridge Goalie stats Dave Kerr
April 3 Montreal Maroons 0–4 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period Neil Colville (1) – 04:24
Neil Coville (2) – 06:45
Frank Boucher (1) – 09:10
No scoring Third period Mac Colville (1) – 02:41
Bill Beveridge Goalie stats Dave Kerr
April 6 Detroit Red Wings 1–5 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period 05:23 – Butch Keeling (2)
09:40 – Lynn Patrick (2)
18:43 – Joe Cooper (1)
No scoring Second period 18:55 – Frank Boucher (2)
Syd Howe (2) – 17:12 Third period 18:22 – Lynn Patrick (3)
Norm Smith Goalie stats Dave Kerr
April 8 New York Rangers 2–4 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 09:22 – ppJohn Sorrell (1)
12:07 – Mud Bruneteau (2)
13:31 – John Gallagher (1)
Babe Pratt (3) – 15:06
Butch Keeling (3) – 18:18
Second period 11:02 – Herbie Lewis (4)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Dave Kerr Goalie stats Norm Smith
April 11 New York Rangers 1–0 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Neil Colville (3) – 00:23 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Dave Kerr Goalie stats Norm Smith
April 13 New York Rangers 0–1 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 12:43 – Marty Barry (2)
Dave Kerr Goalie stats Norm Smith
April 15 New York Rangers 0–3 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period 19:22 – ppMarty Barry (3)
No scoring Second period 09:36 – John Sorrell (2)
No scoring Third period 02:22 – Marty Barry (4)
Dave Kerr Goalie stats Norm Smith
1936–37 NHL season by team
Canadian
American
See also
1910s
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

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