1935 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1935 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the third playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 8, 1935, at Cleveland Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio, hosted by the Cleveland Indians of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 4–1.

1935 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 1
American League 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 X 4 8 0
DateJuly 8, 1935
VenueCleveland Stadium
CityCleveland, Ohio
Managers
Attendance69,812
RadioMutual, CBS, NBC
Radio announcersBob Elson, Ellis VanderPyl (Mutual)
Jack Graney, France Laux (CBS)
Tom Manning, Graham McNamee (NBC)

Rosters

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

National League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Bill Walker Cardinals 1
C Jimmie Wilson Phillies 2
1B Bill Terry Giants 3
2B Billy Herman Cubs 2
3B Pepper Martin Cardinals 3
SS Arky Vaughan Pirates 2
LF Joe Medwick Cardinals 2
CF Wally Berger Braves 3
RF Mel Ott Giants 2
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Dizzy Dean Cardinals 2
P Paul Derringer Reds 1
P Carl Hubbell Giants 3
P Hal Schumacher Giants 2
P Van Mungo[1] Dodgers 2
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Gabby Hartnett Cubs 3
C Gus Mancuso Giants 1
1B Ripper Collins Cardinals 1
2B Frankie Frisch Cardinals 3
2B Burgess Whitehead Cardinals 1
OF Jo-Jo Moore Giants 2
OF Paul Waner Pirates 3

American League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Lefty Gomez Yankees 3
C Rollie Hemsley Browns 1
1B Lou Gehrig Yankees 3
2B Charlie Gehringer Tigers 2
3B Jimmie Foxx Athletics 3
SS Joe Cronin Red Sox 3
LF Bob Johnson Athletics 1
CF Al Simmons White Sox 3
RF Joe Vosmik Indians 1
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Tommy Bridges Tigers 2
P Lefty Grove Red Sox 2
P Mel Harder Indians 2
P Schoolboy Rowe Tigers 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Mickey Cochrane Tigers 2
C Rick Ferrell Red Sox 3
2B Buddy Myer Senators 1
SS Ossie Bluege Senators 1
OF Earl Averill[1] Indians 3
OF Ben Chapman Yankees 3
OF Doc Cramer Athletics 1
OF Sam West Browns 3

Game

Umpires

Position Umpire League
Home Plate Red Ormsby American
First Base George Magerkurth National
Second Base Harry Geisel American
Third Base Ziggy Sears National

The umpires rotated positions clockwise in the middle of the fifth inning, with Magerkurth moving behind the plate.[2]

Starting lineups

National League American League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Pepper Martin Cardinals 3B 1 Joe Vosmik Indians RF
2 Arky Vaughan Pirates SS 2 Charlie Gehringer Tigers 2B
3 Mel Ott Giants RF 3 Lou Gehrig Yankees 1B
4 Joe Medwick Cardinals LF 4 Jimmie Foxx Athletics 3B
5 Bill Terry Giants 1B 5 Bob Johnson Athletics LF
6 Wally Berger Braves CF 6 Al Simmons White Sox CF
7 Billy Herman Cubs 2B 7 Rollie Hemsley Browns C
8 Jimmie Wilson Phillies C 8 Joe Cronin Senators SS
9 Bill Walker Cardinals P 9 Lefty Gomez Yankees P

Game summary

Monday, July 8, 1935 1:30 pm (ET) at Cleveland Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 1
American League 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 - 4 8 0
WP: Lefty Gomez (1–0)   LP: Bill Walker (0–1)   Sv: Mel Harder (1)
Home runs:
NL: None
AL: Jimmie Foxx (1)

Lefty Gomez of the Yankees pitches six innings, gives up three hits and is the winning pitcher. Jimmie Foxx drives in three with a two-run homer and a single. Bill Walker is the losing pitcher.

References

  1. ^ a b Player declined or was unable to play.
  2. ^ "American League 4, National League 1". Retrosheet. July 8, 1935. Retrieved October 23, 2016.

External links

1935 Detroit Tigers season

The 1935 Detroit Tigers won the 1935 World Series, defeating the Chicago Cubs 4 games to 2. The season was their 35th since they entered the American League in 1901. It was the first World Series championship for the Tigers.

1935 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1935 Pittsburgh Pirates season was a season in American baseball which involved the Pirates finishing fourth in the National League.

The roster featured five future Hall of Famers: player-manager Pie Traynor, pitcher Waite Hoyt, shortstop Arky Vaughan, center fielder Lloyd Waner, and right fielder Paul Waner.

1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1936 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the fourth playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 7, 1936, at National League Park in Boston, Massachusetts, the home of the Boston Bees of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 4–3. It was the National League's first win in All-Star Game history.

Cleveland Stadium

Cleveland Stadium, commonly known as Municipal Stadium or Lakefront Stadium, was a multi-purpose stadium located in Cleveland, Ohio. It was one of the early multi-purpose stadiums, built to accommodate both baseball and football. The stadium opened in 1931 and is best known as the long-time home of the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball, from 1932 to 1993, and the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL), from 1946 to 1995, in addition to hosting other teams, sports, and being a regular concert venue. The stadium was a four-time host of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, one of the host venues of the 1948 and 1954 World Series, and the site of the original Dawg Pound, Red Right 88, and The Drive.

Through most of its tenure as a baseball facility, the stadium was the largest in Major League Baseball by seating capacity, seating over 78,000 initially and over 74,000 in its final years. It was superseded only by the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum from 1958 to 1961, while it was the temporary home of the Los Angeles Dodgers, and by Mile High Stadium in 1993, the temporary home of the expansion Colorado Rockies. For football, the stadium seated approximately 80,000 people, ranking as one of the larger seating capacities in the NFL.

Former Browns owner Art Modell took over control of the stadium from the city in the 1970s and while his organization made improvements to the facility, it continued to decline. The Indians played their final game at the stadium in October 1993 and moved to Jacobs Field the following season. Although plans were announced to renovate the stadium for use by the Browns, in 1995 Modell announced his intentions to move the team to Baltimore citing the state of Cleveland Stadium as a major factor. The Browns played their final game at the stadium in December 1995. As part of an agreement between Modell, the city of Cleveland, and the NFL, the Browns were officially deactivated for three seasons and the city was required to construct a new stadium on the Cleveland Stadium site. Cleveland Stadium was demolished in 1996 to make way for FirstEnergy Stadium, which opened in 1999. Much of the debris from the demolition was placed in Lake Erie to create an artificial reef.

De La Salle Institute

De La Salle Institute is a Catholic, Lasallian, coeducational, secondary school located in the Bronzeville neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, United States.

The school is considered a historic institution on Chicago's South Side. It is located three blocks east of Guaranteed Rate Field, the home of MLB's Chicago White Sox. While located in the historic Bronzeville neighborhood, it has very strong ties to the nearby Bridgeport neighborhood. The school is separated from Bridgeport and Guaranteed Rate Field by the Dan Ryan Expressway.

While coming from a commemorative book published by the school, the authors of American Pharaoh:Mayor Richard J. Daley: His Battle for Chicago and the Nation note the following about the school's impact on the history of Chicago:

"The Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton" but "the business leaders of Chicago were trained in the Counting Rooms of De La Salle."

Red Ormsby

Emmet Thomas "Red" Ormsby (April 3, 1895 – October 11, 1962) was a professional baseball umpire who worked in the American League from 1923 to 1941. Ormsby umpired 2,537 major league games in his 19-year career, in addition to working in the 1935 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, and in four World Series (1927, 1933, 1937, and 1940).

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