1935–36 FA Cup

The 1935–36 FA Cup was the 61st season of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. Arsenal won the competition for the second time, beating Sheffield United 1–0 in the final at Wembley, through a late goal from Ted Drake.

Matches were scheduled to be played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. Some matches, however, might be rescheduled for other days if there were clashes with games for other competitions or the weather was inclement. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If the replayed match was drawn further replays would be held until a winner was determined. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

1935–36 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsSheffield Wednesday
ChampionsArsenal (2nd title)
Runners-upSheffield United

Calendar

Round Date
Extra preliminary round Saturday 7 September 1935
Preliminary round Saturday 21 September 1935
First round qualifying Saturday 5 October 1935
Second round qualifying Saturday 19 October 1935
Third round qualifying Saturday 2 November 1935
Fourth round qualifying Saturday 16 November 1935
First round proper Saturday 30 November 1935
Second round proper Saturday 14 December 1935
Third round proper Saturday 11 January 1936
Fourth round proper Saturday 25 January 1936
Fifth round proper Saturday 15 February 1936
Sixth round proper Saturday 29 February 1936
Semi-finals Saturday 21 March 1936
Final Saturday 25 April 1936

First round proper

At this stage 43 clubs from the Football League Third Division North and South joined the 25 non-league clubs having come through the qualifying rounds. Stockport County, Millwall and Luton Town were given a bye to the third round. To make the number of matches up, non-league Bishop Auckland and Corinthian were given byes to this round. 34 matches were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 30 November 1935. Six were drawn and went to replays in the following midweek fixture.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Chester 1–0 Gateshead 30 November 1935
2 Chesterfield 3–0 Southport 30 November 1935
3 Darlington 4–2 Accrington Stanley 30 November 1935
4 Barrow 4–1 Wrexham 30 November 1935
5 Bristol City 0–1 Crystal Palace 30 November 1935
6 Grantham 0–2 Notts County 30 November 1935
7 Southall 3–1 Swindon Town 30 November 1935
8 Reading 8–3 Corinthian 30 November 1935
9 Walsall 2–0 Lincoln City 30 November 1935
10 Crewe Alexandra 4–2 Boston United 30 November 1935
11 Gainsborough Trinity 3–1 Blyth Spartans 30 November 1935
12 Scarborough 2–0 Darwen 30 November 1935
13 Tranmere Rovers 3–0 Carlisle United 30 November 1935
14 Kidderminster Harriers 4–1 Bishop Auckland 30 November 1935
15 Northampton Town 0–0 Bristol Rovers 30 November 1935
Replay Bristol Rovers 3–1 Northampton Town 4 December 1935
16 Coventry City 1–1 Scunthorpe United 30 November 1935
Replay Scunthorpe United 4–2 Coventry City 9 December 1935
17 Brighton & Hove Albion 0–0 Cheltenham Town 30 November 1935
Replay Cheltenham Town 0–6 Brighton & Hove Albion 4 December 1935
18 Clapton Orient 0–0 Aldershot 30 November 1935
Replay Aldershot 0–1 Clapton Orient 4 December 1935
19 Oldham Athletic 6–1 Ferryhill Athletic 30 November 1935
20 Nunhead 2–4 Watford 30 November 1935
21 Exeter City 0–4 Gillingham 30 November 1935
22 Mansfield Town 2–3 Hartlepools United 30 November 1935
23 Cardiff City 0–3 Dartford 30 November 1935
24 Halifax Town 4–0 Rochdale 30 November 1935
25 Stalybridge Celtic 4–0 Kells United 30 November 1935
26 Newport County 0–1 Southend United 30 November 1935
27 Margate 3–1 Queens Park Rangers 30 November 1935
28 Yeovil & Petter's United 0–1 Newport (IOW) 30 November 1935
29 Dulwich Hamlet 2–3 Torquay United 30 November 1935
30 New Brighton 1–3 Workington 30 November 1935
31 Walthamstow Avenue 1–1 Bournemouth 30 November 1935
Replay Bournemouth 8–1 Walthamstow Avenue 4 December 1935
32 York City 1–5 Burton Town 30 November 1935
33 Romford 3–3 Folkestone 30 November 1935
Replay Folkestone 2–1 Romford 4 December 1935
34 Wigan Athletic 1–2 Rotherham United 30 November 1935

Second round proper

The matches were played on Saturday, 14 December 1935. Six matches were drawn, with replays taking place in the following midweek fixture. One of these, Halifax Town against Hartlepools United, went to a second replay.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Chester 3–3 Reading 14 December 1935
Replay Reading 3–0 Chester 18 December 1935
2 Chesterfield 0–0 Walsall 14 December 1935
Replay Walsall 2–1 Chesterfield 19 December 1935
3 Dartford 4–0 Gainsborough Trinity 14 December 1935
4 Bournemouth 5–2 Barrow 14 December 1935
5 Southall 8–0 Newport (IOW) 14 December 1935
6 Folkestone 1–2 Clapton Orient 14 December 1935
7 Notts County 3–0 Torquay United 14 December 1935
8 Crewe Alexandra 2–1 Gillingham 14 December 1935
9 Scarborough 1–1 Brighton & Hove Albion 14 December 1935
Replay Brighton & Hove Albion 3–0 Scarborough 18 December 1935
10 Tranmere Rovers 6–2 Scunthorpe United 14 December 1935
11 Oldham Athletic 1–1 Bristol Rovers 14 December 1935
Replay Bristol Rovers 4–1 Oldham Athletic 18 December 1935
12 Southend United 5–0 Burton Town 14 December 1935
13 Halifax Town 1–1 Hartlepools United 14 December 1935
Replay Hartlepools United 0–0 Halifax Town 18 December 1935
Replay Halifax Town 1–4 Hartlepools United 23 December 1935
14 Stalybridge Celtic 0–1 Darlington 14 December 1935
15 Margate 3–1 Crystal Palace 14 December 1935
16 Workington 5–1 Kidderminster Harriers 14 December 1935
17 Rotherham United 1–1 Watford 14 December 1935
Replay Watford 1–0 Rotherham United 18 December 1935

Third round proper

The 44 First and Second Division clubs entered the competition at this stage, along with Stockport County, Millwall and Luton Town. The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 11 January 1936. Twelve matches were drawn and went to replays in the following midweek fixture.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Blackpool 3–1 Margate 11 January 1936
2 Darlington 2–3 Bury 11 January 1936
3 Burnley 0–0 Sheffield United 11 January 1936
Replay Sheffield United 2–1 Burnley 16 January 1936
4 Liverpool 1–0 Swansea Town 11 January 1936
5 Southall 1–4 Watford 11 January 1936
6 Reading 1–3 Manchester United 11 January 1936
7 Walsall 0–2 Newcastle United 11 January 1936
8 Leicester City 1–0 Brentford 11 January 1936
9 Notts County 0–0 Tranmere Rovers 11 January 1936
Replay Tranmere Rovers 4–3 Notts County 15 January 1936
10 Blackburn Rovers 1–1 Bolton Wanderers 11 January 1936
Replay Bolton Wanderers 0–1 Blackburn Rovers 15 January 1936
11 Aston Villa 0–1 Huddersfield Town 11 January 1936
12 Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–1 Leeds United 11 January 1936
Replay Leeds United 3–1 Wolverhampton Wanderers 15 January 1936
13 Crewe Alexandra 1–1 Sheffield Wednesday 11 January 1936
Replay Sheffield Wednesday 3–1 Crewe Alexandra 15 January 1936
14 Middlesbrough 1–0 Southampton 11 January 1936
15 West Bromwich Albion 2–0 Hull City 11 January 1936
16 Sunderland 2–2 Port Vale 11 January 1936
Replay Port Vale 2–0 Sunderland 13 January 1936
17 Derby County 3–2 Dartford 11 January 1936
18 Everton 1–3 Preston North End 11 January 1936
19 Doncaster Rovers 1–2 Nottingham Forest 11 January 1936
20 Stockport County 2–3 Plymouth Argyle 11 January 1936
21 Tottenham Hotspur 4–4 Southend United 11 January 1936
Replay Southend United 1–2 Tottenham Hotspur 15 January 1936
22 Manchester City 3–1 Portsmouth 11 January 1936
23 Fulham 2–1 Brighton & Hove Albion 11 January 1936
24 Barnsley 3–3 Birmingham 11 January 1936
Replay Birmingham 0–2 Barnsley 15 January 1936
25 Bristol Rovers 1–5 Arsenal 11 January 1936
26 West Ham United 2–2 Luton Town 11 January 1936
Replay Luton Town 4–0 West Ham United 15 January 1936
27 Norwich City 1–1 Chelsea 11 January 1936
Replay Chelsea 3–1 Norwich City 15 January 1936
28 Bradford City 1–0 Bournemouth 11 January 1936
29 Millwall 0–0 Stoke City 11 January 1936
Replay Stoke City 4–0 Millwall 15 January 1936
30 Clapton Orient 3–0 Charlton Athletic 11 January 1936
31 Bradford Park Avenue 3–2 Workington 11 January 1936
32 Hartlepools United 0–0 Grimsby Town 11 January 1936
Replay Grimsby Town 4–1 Hartlepools United 14 January 1936

Fourth round proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 25 January 1936, although four games were played at later dates. Four games were drawn and went to replays in the following midweek fixture, of which one went to a second replay.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Liverpool 0–2 Arsenal 25 January 1936
2 Preston North End 0–0 Sheffield United 25 January 1936
Replay Sheffield United 2–0 Preston North End 30 January 1936
3 Leicester City 6–3 Watford 25 January 1936
4 Sheffield Wednesday 1–1 Newcastle United 27 January 1936
Replay Newcastle United 3–1 Sheffield Wednesday 29 January 1936
5 Middlesbrough 3–0 Clapton Orient 25 January 1936
6 Derby County 2–0 Nottingham Forest 25 January 1936
7 Tranmere Rovers 2–4 Barnsley 25 January 1936
8 Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 Huddersfield Town 25 January 1936
9 Manchester City 2–1 Luton Town 25 January 1936
10 Fulham 5–2 Blackpool 25 January 1936
11 Bradford City 3–1 Blackburn Rovers 3 February 1936
12 Chelsea 4–1 Plymouth Argyle 25 January 1936
13 Bradford Park Avenue 1–1 West Bromwich Albion 29 January 1936
Replay West Bromwich Albion 1–1 Bradford Park Avenue 3 February 1936
Replay Bradford Park Avenue 2–0 West Bromwich Albion 10 February 1936
14 Port Vale 0–4 Grimsby Town 25 January 1936
15 Leeds United 3–2 Bury 29 January 1936
16 Stoke City 0–0 Manchester United 25 January 1936
Replay Manchester United 0–2 Stoke City 29 January 1936

Fifth round proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 15 February 1936, except for the Chelsea–Fulham derby game, which was played four days later. There were three replays, played in the next midweek fixture.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Grimsby Town 3–2 Manchester City 15 February 1936
2 Middlesbrough 2–1 Leicester City 15 February 1936
3 Sheffield United 3–1 Leeds United 15 February 1936
4 Newcastle United 3–3 Arsenal 15 February 1936
Replay Arsenal 3–0 Newcastle United 19 February 1936
5 Barnsley 2–1 Stoke City 15 February 1936
6 Bradford City 0–1 Derby County 15 February 1936
7 Chelsea 0–0 Fulham 19 February 1936
Replay Fulham 3–2 Chelsea 24 February 1936
8 Bradford Park Avenue 0–0 Tottenham Hotspur 15 February 1936
Replay Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 Bradford Park Avenue 17 February 1936

Sixth round proper

The four quarter-final ties were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 29 February 1936. There were no replays.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Grimsby Town 3–1 Middlesbrough 29 February 1936
2 Sheffield United 3–1 Tottenham Hotspur 29 February 1936
3 Fulham 3–0 Derby County 29 February 1936
4 Arsenal 4–1 Barnsley 29 February 1936

Semi-finals

The semi-final matches were played on Saturday, 21 March 1936. Sheffield United and Arsenal won their matches to meet in the final at Wembley

Sheffield United2–1Fulham
Arsenal1–0Grimsby Town

Final

The 1936 FA Cup Final was contested by Arsenal and Sheffield United at Wembley. Arsenal won by a single goal, scored by Ted Drake.

Match details

Arsenal1 – 0Sheffield United
Drake Goal 74' Report
Arsenal
Sheffield United

See also

References

General
Specific
1935–36 Birmingham F.C. season

The 1935–36 Football League season was Birmingham Football Club's 40th in the Football League and their 23rd in the First Division. They finished in 12th position in the 22-team division. They entered the 1935–36 FA Cup at the third round proper and lost to Barnsley in that round after a replay.

Twenty-seven players made at least one appearance in nationally organised competition, and there were fourteen different goalscorers. Forward Fred Harris was ever-present for the 44-match season, and Charlie Wilson Jones was leading scorer with 20 goals, of which 19 came in the league.

1936 FA Cup Final

The 1936 FA Cup Final was a football match between Arsenal and Sheffield United on 25 April 1936 at Wembley. The showpiece match of English football's primary cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup (better known as the FA Cup), it was the 61st Cup final, and the fourteenth at the national stadium.

Each team received a bye to the third round of the tournament, and then progressed through five rounds before reaching the final. Arsenal were in a successful phase, with this final following recent First Division titles, while Sheffield United were attempting to emulate the success of their rivals Sheffield Wednesday in the tournament the year before. A closely fought first half was followed by a dominant second half by Arsenal, who won by a single goal, scored by Ted Drake in the 74th minute. A media ban by the stadium's bosses caused reporters to fly above the stadium in autogyros to see the match and the BBC experimented with sports commentators for the first time during its live broadcast of the final.

Cliff Ette

Clifford 'Cliff' Ette (September 1910 – 1995) was an English footballer who played, as an inside-right, for Northampton Nomads, West Ham United and London League Park Royal.

Harry Pringle

Henry "Harry" Pringle (8 April 1900 – 8 January 1965) was an English professional footballer who scored 60 goals from 292 appearances in the Football League playing as a forward for Lincoln City.

Johnny Cochrane

Johnny Cochrane (born in Paisley) was a Scottish football manager.

List of Sunderland A.F.C. managers

Sunderland Association Football Club was founded in September 1880 as Sunderland and District Teachers Association Football Club. After turning professional in 1886, the club appointed Tom Watson as their first manager, and under Watson the team won the Football League First Division three times in four seasons. The percentage of games won under Watson remains the highest of all time for a Sunderland manager. Watson left to manage Liverpool and was replaced by Robert Campbell, but the new manager failed to continue the success of his predecessor. The next three managers, Alex Mackie, Bob Kyle and Johnny Cochrane, each won the First Division title while at the club. Kyle's 817 games in charge, spread over 19 full seasons either side of the First World War, make him Sunderland's longest-serving manager. Cochrane led the club to their first FA Cup victory, beating Preston North End 3–1 in the 1937 final. The closest they had come in previous seasons was as losing finalists in 1913 under Kyle.After Cochrane, no manager won a trophy until Bob Stokoe led the team to their second FA Cup with a 1–0 win over Leeds United in the 1973 FA Cup Final. Stokoe took Sunderland into European competition for the first time in their history, but they were knocked out in the second round of the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup by Sporting Clube de Portugal. Len Ashurst led Sunderland to their first League Cup final, which they lost 1–0 to Norwich City, but relegation brought him the sack at the end of the season. Under Lawrie McMenemy, Sunderland were relegated to the Third Division for the first time in their history. Following this, Denis Smith was named as manager, and saw the club back into the Second Division.Peter Reid brought Sunderland to the Premier League for the first time in their history in the 1996–97 season, but they were relegated in their debut season. The team progressed as far as the Division One play-off final in 1998, drawing 4–4 after extra time before losing 7–6 on penalties, and went one step further the following season, winning promotion as champions with a record total, at that time, of 105 points. Still led by Reid, they went on to achieve their highest place finish in the Premier League, finishing seventh in two consecutive seasons, and narrowly missed out on a UEFA Cup place. In 2002–03, Sunderland had three different managers, with Reid, Howard Wilkinson and, towards the end of the season, Mick McCarthy; the club ended that season with a then record low total of 19 points. Under McCarthy, a third-place finish in the Championship earned Sunderland a place in the 2003–04 play-offs, only to lose to Crystal Palace in the semi-finals; in 2004–05, they were promoted as champions, clinching the title with a 2–1 win over West Ham. In March 2006, McCarthy was sacked in a season where Sunderland gained just 15 points, breaking their previous record, with former player Kevin Ball taking over as caretaker manager for the remaining games. Following a takeover of the club, incoming chairman Niall Quinn acted as manager until Roy Keane's appointment three weeks into the 2006–07 season. Keane went on to win the Championship title in his first season of management. After keeping the side in the Premier League, he resigned in December 2008 and Ricky Sbragia eventually assumed the role after a spell as caretaker. Sbragia resigned immediately after the final match of the 2008–09 season, when Sunderland had achieved survival in the Premier League. Wigan Athletic manager Steve Bruce was appointed as his successor in June 2009. Having spent two-and-a-half years as manager, Bruce was sacked on 30 November 2011. Martin O'Neill, a boyhood fan of the club, was appointed as manager on 3 December 2011. Sunderland's form soon took off, picking up 27 points in O'Neill's first 18 league games in charge, as well as reaching an FA Cup quarter-final. However, the team underperformed during the 2012–13 season, and on 30 March 2013, O'Neill was sacked. The following day on 31 March 2013, Paolo Di Canio was appointed on a ​2 1⁄2-year contract. Di Canio was sacked less than six months later with Sunderland bottom of the Premier League.

Patrick Gallacher

Patrick "Patsy" Gallacher (21 August 1909 – 4 January 1992) was a Scottish footballer who played for Stoke City, Sunderland and the Scotland national football team as a striker.

Raich Carter

Horatio Stratton "Raich" Carter (21 December 1913 – 9 October 1994) was an English sportsman who played association football for Sunderland from 1931 to 1939, for Derby County from 1945 to 1948 and for Hull City from 1948 to 1952. He also played first-class cricket for Derbyshire in 1946. Later he became a football manager.

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FA competitions
Football League
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