1933 College Football All-America Team

The 1933 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1933. The eight selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1933 season are (1) the All-America Board, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (4) the International News Service (INS), (5) Liberty magazine, (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (7) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and the United Press (UP).[1][2] The only unanimous selections were center Chuck Bernard of Michigan and quarterback Cotton Warburton of USC.

Consensus All-Americans

For the year 1933, the NCAA recognizes eight published All-American teams as "official" designations for purposes of its consensus determinations.[2] The following chart identifies the NCAA-recognized consensus All-Americans and displays which first-team designations they received.

Name Position School Number Official Other
Chuck Bernard Center Michigan 9/9 AAB, AP, CO, FWAA, INS, LIB, NANA, NEA, UP CNS, CP, DJW, MP, NYS, WC, WD
Cotton Warburton Quarterback USC 9/9 AAB, AP, CO, FWAA, INS, LIB, NANA, NEA, UP CNS, CP, DJW, MP, NYS, WC, WD
Joe Skladany End Pittsburgh 8/9 AAB, AP, CO, FWAA, INS, LIB, NANA, NEA CNS, CP, DJW, NYS, WC, WD
Bill Corbus Guard Stanford 8/9 AAB, AP, CO, FWAA, INS, LIB, NANA, NEA CNS, CP, DJW, NYS, WC, WD
George Sauer Halfback Nebraska 8/9 AAB, AP, CO, FWAA, INS, LIB, NANA, NEA CNS, DJW, MP, WC, WD
Beattie Feathers Halfback Tennessee 7/9 AAB, CO, FWAAA, INS, LIB, NANA, NEA CNS, CP, DJW, NYS, WC, WD-1
Fred Crawford Tackle Duke 6/9 AP, CO, INS, LIB, NANA, UP CNS, CP, MP, WD
Aaron Rosenberg Guard USC 5/9 AAB, CO, INS, NEA, UP CNS, MP, NYS, WC, WD
Duane Purvis Fullback Purdue 5/9 AAB, CO, LIB, NANA, UP WC, WD
Francis Wistert Tackle Michigan 4/9 AAB, CO, FWAA, UP CNS, DJW, NYS, WC
Bill Smith[3] End Washington 3/9 AAB, LIB, NANA MP, WC
Paul Geisler End Centenary 2/9 AP, UP WD

All-American selections for 1933

Ends

  • Joe Skladany, Pittsburgh (College Football Hall of Fame) (AAB; AP-1; CO-1; FWAA; INS-1; LIB; NANA-1; NEA-1; UP-3; CNS; CP-1; DJW-1; NYS-1; WC-1; WD-1)
  • Paul Geisler, Centenary (AP-1; CO-2; INS-2; UP-1; CP-3; WD-1)
  • Bill Smith, Washington (AAB; AP-2; CO-3; INS-3; LIB; NANA-1; NEA-2; UP-2; MP-1; WC-1; WD-2)
  • Ted Petoskey, Michigan (AP-2; CO-2; INS-1; NANA-2; UP-2; CP-1; MP-1)
  • Frank Larson, Minnesota (CO-1; INS-2; NANA-2; NEA-1; CNS; NYS-1; WD-2)
  • Edgar Manske, Northwestern (UP-1)
  • Red Matal, Columbia (CO-3; FWAA; INS-3; CP-2; DJW-1)
  • Jim Moscrip, Stanford (College Football Hall of Fame) (NANA-3; NEA-3; CP-2)
  • Hugh Devore, Notre Dame (AP-3)
  • Lester Borden, Fordham (AP-3)
  • Fred Conrinus, St. Mary's (UP-3)
  • Peter James Kopcsak, Army (CP-3)
  • Clary Anderson, Colgate (NANA-3)

Tackles

  • Francis Wistert, Michigan (College Football Hall of Fame) (AAB; CO-1; FWAA; INS-2; NANA-2; UP-1; CNS; CP-2; DJW-1; NYS-1; WC-1)
  • Fred Crawford, Duke (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-1; CO-1; INS-1; LIB; NANA-1; UP-1; CNS; CP-1; MP-1; WD-1)
  • Charles Ceppi, Princeton (AAB; AP-2; CO-3; FWAA; INS-1; LIB; NANA-1; NEA-2; UP-2; CP-1; DJW-1; WC-1; WD-2)
  • Adolphe Schwammel, Oregon State (AP-1; INS-3; UP-3 [g]; MP-1)
  • John Yezerski, St. Mary's (NEA-1)
  • Charles Harvey, Holy Cross (AP-2; INS-2; UP-3; CP-2)
  • Bud Jorgensen, St. Mary's (CO-2; INS-3; UP-2; NYS-1; WD-2)
  • Art Buss, Michigan State (AP-3; CO-3; NEA-2)
  • Cassius Gentry, Oklahoma (AP-3)
  • Frank Walton, Pittsburgh (UP-3; NANA-3)
  • Gail O'Brien, Nebraska (CP-3)
  • George T. Barclay, North Carolina (AP-3 [g]; CP-3)
  • Peter Mehringer, Kansas (CO-2)
  • Lane, Princeton (NANA-2)
  • Ted Rosequist, Ohio State (NANA-3)

Guards

  • Bill Corbus, Stanford (College Football Hall of Fame) (AAB; AP-1; CO-1; FWAA; INS-1; LIB; NANA-1; NEA-1; UP-2; CNS; CP-1; DJW-1; NYS-1; WC-1; WD-1)
  • Aaron Rosenberg, USC (College Football Hall of Fame) (AAB; AP-2; CO-1; INS-1; NANA-2; NEA-1; UP-1; CNS; CP-3; MP-1; NYS-1; WC-1; WD-1)
  • Zud Schammel, Iowa (AP-1; CO-2; LIB; NANA-1; INS-2; UP-1; CP-2; WD-2)
  • Thomas Hupke, Alabama (AP-2; CO-3; INS-3; NANA-3; NEA-2; UP-2; CP-1; WD-2)
  • Larry Stevens, USC (FWAA; INS-3; DJW-1)
  • Harvey Jablonsky, Army (AP-3; UP-3; NANA-3; NEA-2; INS-2; CP-2)
  • Bill Volok, Tulsa (CO-2)
  • Joseph Gailus, Ohio State (CO-3; NANA-2; MP-1)
  • Bunny Burzio, Carnegie Tech (CP-3)

Centers

  • Chuck Bernard, Michigan (AAB; AP-1; CO-1; FWAA; INS-1; LIB; NANA-1; NEA-1; UP-1; CNS; CP-1; DJW-1; MP-1; NYS-1; WC-1; WD-1)
  • Johnny Dell Isola, Fordham (UP-3; CO-2; NANA-2; INS-2; CP-2; WD-2)
  • Lee Coats, UCLA (AP-2; NEA-2)
  • Roy Oen, Minnesota (UP-2; INS-3)
  • Larry Siemering, San Francisco (AP-3)
  • Tal Maples, Tennessee (CP-3)
  • Mike Vuchinich, Ohio State (CO-3)
  • Howard Christie, California (NANA-3)

Quarterbacks

  • Cotton Warburton, USC (College Football Hall of Fame) (AAB; AP-1; CO-1; FWAA; INS-1; LIB; NANA-1; NEA-1; UP-1; CNS; CP-1; DJW-1; MP-1; NYS-1; WC-1; WD-1)
  • Cliff Montgomery, Columbia (AP-3; UP-2; INS-2; CP-3)
  • Joe Laws, Iowa (CO-2; NANA-2; INS-3; DW-2)
  • Paul Johnson, Army (AP-2; NEA-2)
  • Manning Smith, Centenary (UP-3)
  • Deke Brackett, Tennessee (CP-2)
  • Bobby Grayson, Stanford (CO-3; NANA-2 [fb])

Halfbacks

  • Beattie Feathers, Tennessee (College Football Hall of Fame) (AAB; AP-2; CO-1; FWAA; INS-1; LIB; NANA-1; NEA-1; UP-2; CNS; CP-1; DJW-1; NYS-1; WC-1; WD-1)
  • George Sauer, Nebraska (College Football Hall of Fame) (AAB; AP-1; CO-1; FWAA; INS-1; LIB; NANA-1 [fb]; NEA-1; CNS [fb]; CP-2; DJW-1; MP-1; WC-1; WD-1)
  • Jack Buckler, Army (AP-1; CO-2; INS-2; NANA-2; NEA-1; UP-1; CNS; CP-1; MP-1; NYS-1; WD-2)
  • Pug Lund, Minnesota (AP-1; CO-2; FWAA; INS-1; NANA-2; UP-3 [fb]; CP-1 [fb]; DJW-1; MP-1; WD-2 [fb])
  • Norman Franklin, Oregon State (AP-3; CO-3; INS-3; NEA-2; UP-1; WD-2)
  • Herman Everhardus, Michigan (COL-3; INS-2; NANA-3 [qb]; NEA-2)
  • Ed Danowski, Fordham (CO-2 [fb]; INS-2 [fb]; NANA-3; UP-3)
  • Doug Nott, Detroit (UP-2; CP-3)
  • George Wilson, St. Mary's (AP-3; UP-3; CP-2)
  • Dixie Howell, Alabama (CP-3)
  • Garrett LeVan, Princeton (NANA-3)

Fullbacks

Key

  • Bold – Consensus All-American[1]
  • -1 – First-team selection
  • -2 – Second-team selection
  • -3 – Third-team selection

NCAA recognized "official" selectors

Other selectors

  • CP = Central Press Association, as picked by football team captains[10]
  • NYS = New York Sun[11]
  • WC = Walter Camp Football Foundation[12]
  • DJW = Davis J. Walsh, sports editor of International News Service[13]
  • FWAA = Football Writers Association of American[4]
  • WD = Walter Dobbins, a consensus based on the selections of Collier's, the United Press, the Associated Press, the All America Board, the New York Sun, the North America Newspaper Alliance, and Hearst[14]
  • MP = Midweek Pictorial[15]
  • CNS = Consensus team based on combined selections of the United Press, Associated Press, NEA News Service and the Collier's Weekly team by Grantland Rice[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Football Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2016. p. 7. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  2. ^ a b ESPN College Football Encyclopedia. ESPN Books. 2005. p. 1165. ISBN 1401337031.(The ESPN College Football Encyclopedia lists the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) as the eighth selector and does not include the NANA as a consensus selector. Both NANA and FWAA are included as consensus selectors in this article.)
  3. ^ Bill Smith is not recognized by the NCAA as a consensus All-American even though he had three of nine first-team selections. Instead, Paul Geisler, who had two of nine first-team selections, is recognized as a consensus All-American at the end position.
  4. ^ a b ESPN College Football Encyclopedia. ESPN Books. 2005. p. 1165. ISBN 1401337031.
  5. ^ "AP All America". Bismarck Tribune. 1933-12-02.
  6. ^ "Rice Picks His All-American". Modesto Bee And News-Herald. 1933-12-23.
  7. ^ "N.A.N.A. All-American". Los Angeles Times. 1933-12-03.
  8. ^ "NEA All America". Bismarck Tribune. 1933-12-02.
  9. ^ "Five Big Ten Players Selected on United Press Team". Kokomo Tribune. 1933-11-30.
  10. ^ William Ritt (Central Press Sports Editor) (1933-12-07). "Here's 1933 All-American Football Team Selected By Players: Players Selected By Grid Captains". Evening Independent. Massillon, OH.
  11. ^ "Jorgenson and Corbus on Sun All-American". Oakland Tribune. 1933-12-01.
  12. ^ "Walter Camp Football Foundation All-American Selections". Walter Camp Football Foundation. Archived from the original on 2007-12-18.
  13. ^ Davis J. Walsh (1933-12-04). "Davis J. Walsh Has Picked His All-Americans". New Castle News.
  14. ^ Walter Dobbins (1933-12-23). "Bernard, Warburton Unanimous Choice For All America Berths". Lincoln Star.
  15. ^ "All-America Addendum -- Part 2" (PDF). College Football Historical Society Newsletter. November 2008.
  16. ^ Ted A. Ramsay (1933-12-24). "DAILY MAIL'S ALL-AMERICA CONSENSUS TEAM FOR 1933 ANNOUNCED: FOUR SELECTIONS USED; Warburton, Crawford and Bernard Are Unanimous Choices; Nation's Best Placed". Charleston Daily Mail.
1933 All-Big Six Conference football team

The 1933 All-Big Six Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Six Conference teams for the 1933 college football season. The selectors for the 1933 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1933 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1933 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1933 Big Ten Conference football season.

1933 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1933 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1933 college football season. The organizations selecting teams in 1933 included the Associated Press (AP), the Newspaper Enterprise Association, and the United Press (UP).

1933 All-SEC football team

The 1933 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1933 college football season. This was the inaugural SEC season; the All-SEC teams now taking precedence over the All-Southern team. The Associated Press (AP) All-SEC teams are the only ones which become a part of official conference records. The Alabama Crimson Tide won the conference, the only blemish on its conference record a scoreless tie with the Ole Miss Rebels. Tennessee halfback Beattie Feathers was voted SEC Player of the Year.

1933 All-Southern Conference football team

The 1933 All-Southern Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the All-Southern Conference football team for the 1933 college football season.

1933 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1933 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1933 college football season. The selectors for the 1933 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1933 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1933 Big Ten Conference football season was the 38th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1933 college football season.

Michigan compiled a 7–0–1 record, extended its unbeaten streak to 22 games, shut out five of eight opponents, gave up an average of 2.3 points per game, outscored opponents 131 to 18, and was the Big Ten champion. In December 1933, Michigan was awarded the Knute K. Rockne Trophy as the No. 1 team in the country under the Dickinson System. Two other Big Ten teams also finished among the top five teams in the post-season Dickinson ratings: Minnesota at No. 3 and Ohio State at No. 5. Center Chuck Bernard and tackle Francis Wistert were consensus first-team picks for the 1933 College Football All-America Team.

Ohio State finished in third place with a 7–1 and its sole loss being against Michigan.

Iowa quarterback/halfback Joe Laws received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the conference.

1933 Michigan State Spartans football team

The 1933 Michigan State Spartans football team represented Michigan State College in the 1933 college football season. In their first season under head coach Charlie Bachman, the Spartans compiled a 4–2–2 record and lost their annual rivalry game with Michigan by a 20 to 6 score. In inter-sectional play, the team defeated Syracuse (27-3) and played scoreless ties with Kansas State and Carnegie Mellon.Tackle Art Buss was selected by the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA) as a second-team player and by the Associated Press (AP) and Collier's Weekly as a third-team player on the 1933 College Football All-America Team.

1933 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1933 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1933 Big Ten Conference football season. Under fifth-year head coach Harry Kipke, Michigan compiled an undefeated 7–0–1 record, outscored opponents 131 to 18, extended the team's unbeaten streak to 22 games, and won both the Big Ten Conference and national football championships. The defense shut out five of its eight opponents and gave up an average of only 2.2 points per game. In December 1933, Michigan was awarded the Knute K. Rockne Trophy as the No. 1 team in the country under the Dickinson System. By winning a share of its fourth consecutive Big Ten football championships, the 1933 Wolverines also tied a record set by Fielding H. Yost's "Point-a-Minute" teams from 1901 to 1904.

In the first half of the season, Michigan outscored its opponents, 101 to 6, including a 13–0 shutout of Ohio State. In the second half, Michigan outscored its opponents 30 to 12 and defeated Illinois, 7–6, with the difference being Willis Ward's block of an extra point kick. In the annual Little Brown Jug game, Michigan and Minnesota played to scoreless tie, breaking Michigan's 16-game winning streak (but still preserving the unbeaten streak). Two of Michigan's adversaries also finished among the top five teams in the post-season Dickinson ratings: Minnesota at No. 3 and Ohio State at No. 5.

Left halfback Herman Everhardus was selected as the team's Most Valuable Player. He was also the leading scorer in the Big Ten Conference with 64 points. Center Chuck Bernard and tackle Francis Wistert were consensus first-team picks for the 1933 College Football All-America Team. Left end Ted Petoskey was also selected as a first-team All-American by several selectors. Michigan players also won four of the eleven spots on the All-Big Ten teams selected by the Associated Press and United Press. Michigan's first-team All-Big Ten honorees were Bernard, Everhardus, Petoskey, and Wistert.

Beattie Feathers

William Beattie "Big Chief" Feathers (August 20, 1909 – March 11, 1979) was an American football player and coach of football and baseball. He played college football and college basketball at the University of Tennessee.

Bill Smith (American football)

William Arley Smith (January 3, 1912 – June 20, 1999) was a professional American football player. He played college football at the University of Washington and was selected by the All-America Board, Liberty magazine, and the North American Newspaper Alliance as a first-team end on the 1933 College Football All-America Team. He also played professional football at the end position for six seasons in the National Football League (NFL) with the Chicago Cardinals. He was born in Seattle.

Charles Ceppi

Charles Barrus Ceppi (May 8, 1911 – January 13, 1983) was an American football player. He attended Princeton University and played college football for the Princeton Tigers, including Fritz Crisler's undefeated 1933 team that has been recognized as a national co-champion. Ceppi was selected by multiple organizations, including the Football Writers Association of America, the International News Service, Liberty magazine, the North American Newspaper Alliance, and the Central Press Association, as a first-team tackle on the 1933 College Football All-America Team. He later became a physician with a practice in Rhode Island. He sustained a stroke in 1976 and died in 1983.

History of Michigan Wolverines football in the Kipke years

The history of Michigan Wolverines football in the Kipke years covers the history of the University of Michigan Wolverines football program during the period from the hiring of Harry Kipke as head coach in 1929 through his firing after the 1937 season. Michigan was a member of the Big Ten Conference during the Kipke years and played its home games at Michigan Stadium.

During the nine years in which Kipke served as head football coach, Michigan claimed two national championships (1932 and 1933) and had an additional undefeated season in 1930. From 1930 to 1933, Kipke's teams won four consecutive Big Ten Conference co-championships, lost only one game, gave up only 81 points (2.38 points per game), and compiled a record of 31-1-3 (.929). However, in the final four years under Kipke, the team never had a winning season and compiled a record of 10-22 (.313). Kipke was fired after the 1937 season and replaced by Fritz Crisler.

Two Michigan players from the Kipke years have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. They are Harry Newman (quarterback, 1930–1932) and Whitey Wistert (tackle, 1932–1933). A third, Bill Hewitt, was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Gerald Ford, who played for Michigan from 1932 to 1934, went on to serve as the 38th President of the United States.

John Yezerski

John C. Yezerski (September 22, 1913 – January 18, 1979) was an American football player. Yezerski played college football at Saint Mary's College of California. He was selected by the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA) as a first-team tackle on the 1933 College Football All-America Team. He also played professional football as a tackle in the National Football League for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1936.

Paul Geisler

Paul Aubrey "Hoss" Geisler (June 10, 1909 – August 22, 1956) was an American football player. He played college football for Centenary College and was selected as a consensus first-team All-American in 1933.

Geisler was born in Berwick, Louisiana, in 1909. He attended Morgan City High School. He then enrolled at Centenary College where he played at the end position for the undefeated 1932 and 1933 Centenary Gentlemen football teams. He was a consensus first-team selection to the 1933 College Football All-America Team. Geisler began his playing career as a back for the Centenary team, but became a star when he was moved to the end position. LSU coach Biff Jones said Geisler was as "fast as a streak."Geisler later transferred to Louisiana College where he completed his undergraduate studies and also served as an assistant coach. He served in the Air Force during World War II, enlisting in 1943, attaining the rank of captain, and receiving his discharge in 1949. Both before and after the war, he worked as a high school coach at Lake Providence and Tallulah, Louisiana. He became a high school principal and later superintendent of schools at Lake Providence.Geisler was married to Randle Johnson in 1936. He died of a brain tumor in 1956 at the age of 47. He was posthumously inducted into the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 1967.

Red Matal

Anthony R. "Red" Matal Jr. (July 18, 1911 – March 18, 2003), sometimes known as Tony Matal, was an American football player and coach. He was an All-American end at Columbia University in 1933. He later coached football at Columbia and at high schools in Taunton, Massachusetts, and Bergen County, New Jersey.

Thomas Hupke

Thomas George Hupke (December 29, 1910 – September 8, 1959) was an American football player. He played college football at the University of Alabama from 1930 to 1933 and was selected as an All-American in 1933. During the four years Hupke played for the Crimson Tide, the team compiled a record of 34–4–1. He subsequently played professional football for six years with the Detroit Lions (1934–1937) and the Cleveland Rams (1938–1939). He was a member of the 1935 Detroit Lions team that won the 1935 NFL Championship Game. In September 1959, Hupke died in Detroit at age 48 after a long illness.

1933 College Football All-America Team consensus selections
Backfield
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