1932–33 FA Cup

The 1932–33 FA Cup was the 58th season of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. Everton won the competition for the second time, beating Manchester City 3–0 in the final at Wembley.

Matches were scheduled to be played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. Some matches, however, might be rescheduled for other days if there were clashes with games for other competitions or the weather was inclement. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If the replayed match was drawn further replays would be held until a winner was determined. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

1932–33 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsNewcastle United
ChampionsEverton (2nd title)
Runners-upManchester City

Calendar

Round Date
Extra Preliminary Round Saturday 3 September 1932
Preliminary Round Saturday 17 September 1932
First Round Qualifying Saturday 1 October 1932
Second Round Qualifying Saturday 15 October 1932
Third Round Qualifying Saturday 29 October 1932
Fourth Round Qualifying Saturday 12 November 1932
First Round Proper Saturday 26 November 1932
Second Round Proper Saturday 10 December 1932
Third Round Proper Saturday 14 January 1933
Fourth Round Proper Saturday 28 January 1933
Fifth Round Proper Saturday 18 February 1933
Sixth Round Proper Saturday 4 March 1933
Semi-Finals Saturday 18 March 1933
Final Saturday 29 April 1933

First round proper

At this stage 43 clubs from the Football League Third Division North and South joined the 24 non-league clubs having come through the qualifying rounds, plus Third Division South club Brighton & Hove Albion (who failed to apply for exemption and played in the preliminary rounds - they would ultimately reach the Fifth Round!). Barnsley, and Watford were given a bye to the Third Round. To make the number of matches up, non-league Marine and Dulwich Hamlet were given byes to this round. 34 matches were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 26 November 1932. Eight were drawn and went to replays in the following midweek fixture, of which one went to a second replay.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Chester 4–0 Rotherham United 26 November 1932
2 Darlington 1–0 Boston United 26 November 1932
3 Dartford 0–0 Yeovil & Petter's United 26 November 1932
Replay Yeovil & Petter's United 4–2 Dartford 1 December 1932
4 Barrow 0–1 Gateshead 26 November 1932
5 Bristol City 4–0 Romford 26 November 1932
6 Rochdale 0–2 Stockport County 26 November 1932
7 Marine 2–5 Hartlepools United 26 November 1932
8 Reading 3–2 Brentford 26 November 1932
9 Walsall 4–1 Mansfield Town 26 November 1932
10 Folkestone 1–0 Norwich City 26 November 1932
11 Gillingham 1–1 Wycombe Wanderers 26 November 1932
Replay Wycombe Wanderers 2–4 Gillingham 30 November 1932
12 Crewe Alexandra 4–0 Crook Town 26 November 1932
13 Luton Town 2–2 Kingstonian 26 November 1932
Replay Kingstonian 2–3 Luton Town 30 November 1932
14 Swindon Town 4–1 Dulwich Hamlet 26 November 1932
15 Doncaster Rovers 4–1 Gainsborough Trinity 26 November 1932
16 Wrexham 3–0 Spennymoor United 26 November 1932
17 Tranmere Rovers 3–0 New Brighton 26 November 1932
18 Accrington Stanley 2–1 Hereford United 26 November 1932
19 Northampton Town 8–1 Lloyds (Sittingbourne) 26 November 1932
20 Carlisle United 1–0 Denaby United 26 November 1932
21 Clapton Orient 0–1 Aldershot 26 November 1932
22 Crystal Palace 1–2 Brighton & Hove Albion 26 November 1932
23 Southend United 1–1 Exeter City 26 November 1932
Replay Exeter City 0–1 Southend United 30 November 1932
24 Cardiff City 1–1 Bristol Rovers 26 November 1932
Replay Bristol Rovers 4–1 Cardiff City 30 November 1932
25 Merthyr Town 1–1 Queens Park Rangers 26 November 1932
Replay Queens Park Rangers 5–1 Merthyr Town 1 December 1932
26 Halifax Town 2–0 Darwen 26 November 1932
27 Stalybridge Celtic 2–8 Hull City 26 November 1932
28 Newport County 4–2 Ilford 26 November 1932
29 Margate 5–0 Ryde Sports 26 November 1932
30 Southport 3–3 Nelson 26 November 1932
Replay Nelson 0–4 Southport 29 November 1932
31 Torquay United 0–0 Bournemouth 26 November 1932
Replay Bournemouth 2–2 Torquay United 30 November 1932
Replay Torquay United 3–2 Bournemouth 5 December 1932
32 Workington 5–1 Scunthorpe United 26 November 1932
33 York City 1–3 Scarborough 26 November 1932
34 Guildford City 1–2 Coventry City 26 November 1932

Second Round Proper

The matches were played on Saturday, 10 December 1932. Six matches were drawn, with replays taking place in the following midweek fixture. Of these, one game went to a second replay.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Chester 2–1 Yeovil & Petter's United 10 December 1932
2 Bristol City 2–2 Tranmere Rovers 10 December 1932
Replay Tranmere Rovers 3–2 Bristol City 14 December 1932
3 Reading 2–2 Coventry City 10 December 1932
Replay Coventry City 3–3 Reading 15 December 1932
Replay Reading 1–0 Coventry City 19 December 1932
4 Walsall 2–1 Hartlepools United 10 December 1932
5 Folkestone 2–1 Newport County 10 December 1932
6 Crewe Alexandra 0–2 Darlington 10 December 1932
7 Stockport County 2–3 Luton Town 10 December 1932
8 Accrington Stanley 1–2 Aldershot 10 December 1932
9 Bristol Rovers 1–1 Gillingham 10 December 1932
Replay Gillingham 1–3 Bristol Rovers 14 December 1932
10 Northampton Town 0–1 Doncaster Rovers 10 December 1932
11 Brighton & Hove Albion 0–0 Wrexham 10 December 1932
Replay Wrexham 2–3 Brighton & Hove Albion 14 December 1932
12 Carlisle United 1–1 Hull City 10 December 1932
Replay Hull City 2–1 Carlisle United 15 December 1932
13 Southend United 4–1 Scarborough 10 December 1932
14 Halifax Town 2–1 Workington 10 December 1932
15 Southport 1–2 Swindon Town 10 December 1932
16 Torquay United 1–1 Queens Park Rangers 10 December 1932
Replay Queens Park Rangers 3–1 Torquay United 15 December 1932
17 Gateshead 5–2 Margate 10 December 1932

Third round proper

The 44 First and Second Division clubs entered the competition at this stage, along with Barnsley, and Watford. The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 14 January 1933, with the exception of the Millwall–Reading game, which was played four days after. Seven matches were drawn and went to replays in the following midweek fixture.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Birmingham 2–1 Preston North End 14 January 1933
2 Blackpool 2–1 Port Vale 14 January 1933
3 Chester 5–0 Fulham 14 January 1933
4 Darlington 2–0 Queens Park Rangers 14 January 1933
5 Bury 2–2 Nottingham Forest 14 January 1933
Replay Nottingham Forest 1–2 Bury 18 January 1933
6 Watford 1–1 Southend United 14 January 1933
Replay Southend United 2–0 Watford 18 January 1933
7 Walsall 2–0 Arsenal 14 January 1933[1]
8 Leicester City 2–3 Everton 14 January 1933
9 Sheffield Wednesday 2–2 Chesterfield 14 January 1933
Replay Chesterfield 4–2 Sheffield Wednesday 18 January 1933
10 Grimsby Town 3–2 Portsmouth 14 January 1933
11 Wolverhampton Wanderers 3–6 Derby County 14 January 1933
12 West Bromwich Albion 2–0 Liverpool 14 January 1933
13 Lincoln City 1–5 Blackburn Rovers 14 January 1933
14 Swindon Town 1–2 Burnley 14 January 1933
15 Doncaster Rovers 0–3 Halifax Town 14 January 1933
16 Tranmere Rovers 2–1 Notts County 14 January 1933
17 Newcastle United 0–3 Leeds United 14 January 1933
18 Barnsley 0–0 Luton Town 14 January 1933
Replay Luton Town 2–0 Barnsley 18 January 1933
19 Brighton & Hove Albion 2–1 Chelsea 14 January 1933
20 Manchester United 1–4 Middlesbrough 14 January 1933
21 Bradford City 2–2 Aston Villa 14 January 1933
Replay Aston Villa 2–1 Bradford City 18 January 1933
22 Millwall 1–1 Reading 18 January 1933
Replay Reading 0–2 Millwall 23 January 1933
23 Hull City 0–2 Sunderland 14 January 1933
24 Oldham Athletic 0–6 Tottenham Hotspur 14 January 1933
25 Bradford Park Avenue 5–1 Plymouth Argyle 14 January 1933
26 Huddersfield Town 2–0 Folkestone 14 January 1933
27 Swansea Town 2–3 Sheffield United 14 January 1933
28 Charlton Athletic 1–5 Bolton Wanderers 14 January 1933
29 Corinthian 0–2 West Ham United 14 January 1933
30 Stoke City 1–0 Southampton 14 January 1933
31 Aldershot 1–0 Bristol Rovers 14 January 1933
32 Gateshead 1–1 Manchester City 14 January 1933
Replay Manchester City 9–0 Gateshead 18 January 1933

Fourth round proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 28 January 1933. Two games were drawn and went to replays in the following midweek fixture.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Birmingham 3–0 Blackburn Rovers 28 January 1933
2 Blackpool 2–0 Huddersfield Town 28 January 1933
3 Chester 0–0 Halifax Town 28 January 1933
Replay Halifax Town 3–2 Chester 2 February 1933
4 Darlington 0–2 Chesterfield 28 January 1933
5 Burnley 3–1 Sheffield United 28 January 1933
6 Aston Villa 0–3 Sunderland 28 January 1933
7 Bolton Wanderers 2–1 Grimsby Town 28 January 1933
8 Middlesbrough 4–1 Stoke City 28 January 1933
9 Luton Town 2–0 Tottenham Hotspur 28 January 1933
10 Everton 3–1 Bury 28 January 1933
11 Tranmere Rovers 0–0 Leeds United 28 January 1933
Replay Leeds United 4–0 Tranmere Rovers 1 February 1933
12 Manchester City 2–0 Walsall 28 January 1933
13 West Ham United 2–0 West Bromwich Albion 28 January 1933
14 Brighton & Hove Albion 2–1 Bradford Park Avenue 28 January 1933
15 Southend United 2–3 Derby County 28 January 1933
16 Aldershot 1–0 Millwall 28 January 1933

Fifth round proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 18 February 1933. There were two replays, played in the next midweek fixture.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Burnley 1–0 Chesterfield 18 February 1933
2 Bolton Wanderers 2–4 Manchester City 18 February 1933
3 Middlesbrough 0–0 Birmingham 18 February 1933
Replay Birmingham 3–0 Middlesbrough 22 February 1933
4 Sunderland 1–0 Blackpool 18 February 1933
5 Derby County 2–0 Aldershot 18 February 1933
6 Everton 2–0 Leeds United 18 February 1933
7 Brighton & Hove Albion 2–2 West Ham United 18 February 1933
Replay West Ham United 1–0 Brighton & Hove Albion 22 February 1933
8 Halifax Town 0–2 Luton Town 18 February 1933

Sixth round proper

The four Sixth Round ties were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 4 March 1933. There was one replay, between Sunderland and Derby County, played in the following midweek fixture.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Burnley 0–1 Manchester City 4 March 1933
2 Derby County 4–4 Sunderland 4 March 1933
Replay Sunderland 0–1 Derby County 8 March 1933
3 Everton 6–0 Luton Town 4 March 1933
4 West Ham United 4–0 Birmingham 4 March 1933

Semi-Finals

The semi-final matches were played on Saturday, 18 March 1933. Manchester City and Everton won their matches to meet in the final at Wembley.

Everton2–1West Ham United
Manchester City3–2Derby County

Final

The 1933 FA Cup Final was contested by Manchester City and Everton at Wembley on 29 April 1933. Everton won the game for the second time in their history, the previous time coming in 1906.

Match details

Everton3 – 0Manchester City
Stein Goal 41'
Dean Goal 52'
Dunn Goal 80'
Everton
Manchester City

See also

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ Porter, Steve. "Walsall 2-0 Arsenal". www.thegiantkillers.co.uk. Retrieved 5 May 2016.
1932–33 Birmingham F.C. season

The 1932–33 Football League season was Birmingham Football Club's 37th in the Football League and their 20th in the First Division. They finished in 13th position in the 22-team division. They also competed in the 1932–33 FA Cup, entering at the third round proper and losing to West Ham United in the sixth (quarter-final).

Twenty-four players made at least one appearance in nationally organised competition, and there were nine different goalscorers. Full-back Harold Booton and forward Tom Grosvenor were ever-present over the 47-match season, and there were joint leading scorers, with 14 goals: Ernie Curtis and, for the 12th successive season, Joe Bradford. All Bradford's goals came in the league.

At the end of the season, Birmingham were unable to match the offer made by Chelsea to Leslie Knighton to become their manager.

1932–33 Southampton F.C. season

The 1932–33 season was the 38th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's 11th in the Second Division of the Football League. It was another disappointing campaign for the Saints, who finished mid-table and rarely competed for promotion to the First Division. After a slow start to the season, the club had established themselves in the top half of the table by October with a string of victories. By the end of the calendar year, Southampton had dropped as low as 14th in the Second Division table – the position in which they finished the previous season – after a period of poor form in December. Wins were hard to come by in the second half of the season, but a strong run of results in April meant that the side finished 12th with 18 wins, five draws and 19 losses, seven points above the first relegation place.

In the 1932–33 FA Cup, Southampton were drawn away to fellow Second Division side Stoke City. The Potters, who were challenging for the league championship at the time (and eventually won it), edged the game 1–0 to send the Saints out of the third round of the tournament for the sixth consecutive season, marking their worst run to date. The club ended the season against local rivals Portsmouth in a single game for the Hampshire Benevolent Cup and Rowland Hospital Cup, which they lost 5–0 at Fratton Park. They also competed in the second annual Hampshire Combination Cup, losing 6–0 to Pompey in the semi-final. Southampton played another two friendly matches during the campaign, losing to Third Division South side Gillingham in February and beating a side representing the Tidworth Garrison in March.

Southampton used 21 different players during the 1932–33 season and had twelve different goalscorers. Their top scorer was centre-forward Ted Drake, who scored 20 goals in the Second Division. Outside-left Johnny Arnold, top scorer in the previous season, scored eleven times, followed by inside-right Tom Brewis on ten goals. Eight players were signed by the club during the campaign, with 17 released and sold to other clubs. The average attendance at The Dell during the 1932–33 season was 8,779, their lowest in the Football League to date. The highest attendance of the season was 11,862 against Stoke City on 12 November 1932. The lowest attendance was a record low 2,949 against Bradford City on 25 February 1933, the first home game after the controversial sale of Arnold and left-back Michael Keeping.

1933 FA Charity Shield

The 1933 FA Charity Shield was the 20th FA Charity Shield, an annual football match. It was played between Everton (1932–33 FA Cup winners) and Arsenal (1932–33 Football League champions) at Goodison Park in Liverpool on 18 October 1933. Arsenal won the match 2–1.

1933 FA Cup Final

The 1933 FA Cup Final was a football match between Everton and Manchester City on 29 April 1933 at Wembley Stadium in London. The deciding match of English football's primary cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup (better known as the FA Cup), it was the 62nd final, and the 11th at Wembley. The 1933 final was the first where the players, including goalkeepers, were issued numbers for identification. Everton were allocated numbers 1–11 and Manchester City numbers 12–22.

Each team progressed through five rounds to reach the final. Everton won 3–0, with goals from Jimmy Stein, Dixie Dean and James Dunn, and won the cup for the first time since 1906.

Billy Walker (English footballer)

William Henry Walker (29 October 1897 – 28 November 1964) was a prominent English footballer of the 1920s and 1930s. He is considered by many to be the greatest footballer to ever play for Aston Villa Football Club and one of the greatest players to have played for England. As a manager he won the FA Cup with each of Sheffield Wednesday and Nottingham Forest.

Bournemouth Gasworks Athletic F.C.

Bournemouth Gasworks Athletic F.C. were an English amateur football team from Bournemouth, Hampshire, who were successful in both county and national competitions, reaching the final of the FA Amateur Cup in 1930. They became defunct in 1973.

List of Arsenal F.C. managers

Arsenal Football Club is an English professional association football club based in Islington, London. The club was formed in Woolwich in 1886 as Dial Square before it was shortly renamed to Royal Arsenal, and then Woolwich Arsenal in 1893. They became the first southern member admitted into the Football League in 1893, having spent their first four seasons solely participating in cup tournaments and friendlies. The club's name was shortened to Arsenal in 1914, a year after moving to Highbury. In spite of finishing fifth in the Second Division in 1915, Arsenal rejoined the First Division at the expense of local rivals Tottenham Hotspur when football resumed after the First World War. Since that time, they have not fallen below the first tier of the English football league system and hold the record for the longest uninterrupted period in the top flight.There have been nineteen permanent and seven caretaker managers of Arsenal since 1897; Stewart Houston has managed the club in two separate spells as caretaker. The most successful person to manage Arsenal is Arsène Wenger, who won three Premier League titles, seven FA Cups and seven Community Shields between 1996 and 2018. Wenger is the club's longest-serving manager; he surpassed George Allison's record of 13 years in October 2009. Two Arsenal managers have died in the job – Herbert Chapman and Tom Whittaker.

This chronological list comprises all those who have held the position of manager of the first team of Arsenal since their foundation in 1886. Each manager's entry includes his dates of tenure and the club's overall competitive record (in terms of matches won, drawn and lost), honours won and significant achievements while under his care. Caretaker managers are included, where known, as well as those who have been in permanent charge.

Tom Parker (footballer)

Thomas Robert Parker (19 November 1897 – 1 November 1987) was an English footballer and manager. Parker played as a right back for clubs Arsenal and Southampton in his playing career. As a manager he was at the helm of Southampton as well as Norwich City.

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