1930 World Series

The 1930 World Series featured the defending champion Philadelphia Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals. The Athletics defeated the Cardinals in six games, 4–2. Philly's pitching ace Lefty Grove, and George Earnshaw, No. 2 man in Mr. Mack's rotation, won two games apiece. Earnshaw also pitched seven scoreless innings as Game 5 starter, but ended up with a no-decision as Grove relieved him in the eighth and took the win on Jimmie Foxx's two-run homer in the top of the ninth for the game's only scoring.

The Cardinals led the National League in runs scored and averaged six runs per game in the regular season, but could manage only two runs per game in this World Series.

This was the Athletics' fifth World Series championship win (following 1910, 1911, 1913 and 1929), and their last in Philadelphia before moving to Kansas City in 1955 and then Oakland in 1968—where they have since won four more World Series titles (1972, 1973, 1974, and 1989). Their win this year tied them with the Boston Red Sox for most World Series wins as of that point (five) until 1937, when the New York Yankees surged ahead of both in World Series wins and have gone on to amass 27 World Series championships as of 2018.

The city of Philadelphia would have to wait 50 years until its next World Series championship, when the Phillies defeated the Kansas City Royals and thus becoming the last of the "Original Sixteen" MLB franchises to accomplish the feat.

1930 World Series
Team (Wins) Manager(s) Season
Philadelphia Athletics (4) Connie Mack 102–52, .662, GA: 8
St. Louis Cardinals (2) Gabby Street 92–62, .597, GA: 2
DatesOctober 1–8
UmpiresGeorge Moriarty (AL), Cy Rigler (NL), Harry Geisel (AL), Beans Reardon (NL)
Hall of FamersAthletics: Connie Mack (manager), Mickey Cochrane, Jimmie Foxx, Lefty Grove, Eddie Collins, Al Simmons
Cardinals: Jim Bottomley, Dizzy Dean (dnp), Frankie Frisch, Burleigh Grimes, Chick Hafey, Jesse Haines
Broadcast
RadioNBC, CBS
Radio announcersNBC: Graham McNamee
CBS: Ted Husing
World Series

Summary

AL Philadelphia Athletics (4) vs. NL St. Louis Cardinals (2)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 1 St. Louis Cardinals – 2, Philadelphia Athletics – 5 Shibe Park 1:48 32,295[1] 
2 October 2 St. Louis Cardinals – 1, Philadelphia Athletics – 6 Shibe Park 1:47 32,295[2] 
3 October 4 Philadelphia Athletics – 0, St. Louis Cardinals – 5 Sportsman's Park 1:55 36,944[3] 
4 October 5 Philadelphia Athletics – 1, St. Louis Cardinals – 3 Sportsman's Park 1:41 39,946[4] 
5 October 6 Philadelphia Athletics – 2, St. Louis Cardinals – 0 Sportsman's Park 1:58 38,844[5] 
6 October 8 St. Louis Cardinals – 1, Philadelphia Athletics – 7 Shibe Park 1:46 32,295[6]

Matchups

Game 1

Wednesday, October 1, 1930 1:30 pm (ET) at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 9 0
Philadelphia 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 X 5 5 0
WP: Lefty Grove (1–0)   LP: Burleigh Grimes (0–1)
Home runs:
STL: None
PHA: Al Simmons (1), Mickey Cochrane (1)

The A's managed only five hits off of Grimes in Game 1, but all were for extra bases and each produced a run in five different innings. Al Simmons and Mickey Cochrane hit solo home runs for the A's, helping Lefty Grove to a 5-2 win.

Game 2

Thursday, October 2, 1930 1:30 pm (ET) at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 2
Philadelphia 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 X 6 7 2
WP: George Earnshaw (1–0)   LP: Flint Rhem (0–1)
Home runs:
STL: George Watkins (1)
PHA: Mickey Cochrane (2)

George Earnshaw allowed six hits and walked one, putting the A's ahead 2-0. The Athletics scored six runs in the first four innings to put the game out of reach.

Game 3

Saturday, October 4, 1930 1:30 pm (CT) at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, Missouri
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
St. Louis 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 X 5 10 0
WP: Bill Hallahan (1–0)   LP: Rube Walberg (0–1)
Home runs:
PHA: None
STL: Taylor Douthit (1)

After the A's loaded the bases in the top of the first, Hallahan pitched a shutout. Philadelphia left a total of 11 men on base.

Game 4

Sunday, October 5, 1930 1:30 pm (CT) at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, Missouri
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 1
St. Louis 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 X 3 5 1
WP: Jesse Haines (1–0)   LP: Lefty Grove (1–1)

An error by Jimmy Dykes in the fourth inning allowed the Cardinals to score two runs. Haines did not allow a hit after the third inning.

Game 5

Monday, October 6, 1930 1:30 pm (CT) at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, Missouri
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 5 0
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
WP: Lefty Grove (2–1)   LP: Burleigh Grimes (0–2)
Home runs:
PHA: Jimmie Foxx (1)
STL: None

George Earnshaw dueled Burleigh Grimes 0–0 through seven innings before Lefty Grove took over for Earnshaw in the eighth. In the top of the ninth, Grimes walked Mickey Cochrane and then coughed up a home run ball to Jimmie Foxx. It must have been a patented Foxx blast, for Grimes said later, "he hit it so hard I couldn't feel sorry for myself."

Game 6

Wednesday, October 8, 1930 1:30 pm (ET) at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 5 1
Philadelphia 2 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 X 7 7 0
WP: George Earnshaw (2–0)   LP: Bill Hallahan (1–1)
Home runs:
STL: None
PHA: Al Simmons (2), Jimmy Dykes (1)

Earnshaw earned his second win on just one day of rest, pitching a five-hitter; it would be 88 years before another pitcher would start consecutive games in the postseason. Just like in Game 1, the A's seven hits came in five different innings, leading to two runs in the first and fourth innings, and single runs in the third, fifth, and sixth innings. As in Game 1, all the A's hits were extra-base hits, including home runs by Al Simmons and Jimmy Dykes.

Although the A's hit only .197 (35-178) in the six game set, 18 of their hits went for extra bases, outscoring the Cardinals, 21-12. St. Louis only managed a .200 batting average in the series.

Composite line score

1930 World Series (4–2): Philadelphia Athletics (A.L.) over St. Louis Cardinals (N.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia Athletics 5 1 3 5 1 2 1 1 2 21 35 3
St. Louis Cardinals 0 1 3 3 1 0 2 1 1 12 38 5
Total attendance: 212,619   Average attendance: 35,437
Winning player's share: $5,038   Losing player's share: $3,537[7]

Notes

  1. ^ "1930 World Series Game 1 – St. Louis Cardinals vs. Philadelphia Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. ^ "1930 World Series Game 2 – St. Louis Cardinals vs. Philadelphia Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "1930 World Series Game 3 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1930 World Series Game 4 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "1930 World Series Game 5 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. ^ "1930 World Series Game 6 – St. Louis Cardinals vs. Philadelphia Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  7. ^ "World Series Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved June 14, 2009.

References

  • Cohen, Richard M.; Neft, David S. (1990). The World Series: Complete Play-By-Play of Every Game, 1903–1989. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 132–136. ISBN 0-312-03960-3.
  • Reichler, Joseph (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.). Macmillan Publishing. p. 2138. ISBN 0-02-579010-2.

External links

1930 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1930 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 102 wins and 52 losses. It was their second of three consecutive pennants. In the 1930 World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in six games. This was the A's final World Series championship in Philadelphia. They would next win the World Series 42 years later, in 1972, after they had moved to Oakland.

When playing the Cleveland Indians on July 25, the Athletics became the only team in Major League history to execute a triple steal twice in one game.

1930 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1930 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 49th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 39th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 92–62 during the season and finished first in the National League. In the 1930 World Series, they lost to the Philadelphia Athletics in six games.

1930 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1930 throughout the world.

1930 in sports

1930 in sports describes the year's events in world sport.

1931 World Series

The 1931 World Series featured the two-time defending champion Philadelphia Athletics and the St. Louis Cardinals. The Cardinals beat the Athletics in seven games, a rematch and reversal of fortunes of the previous World Series.

The same two teams faced off during the 1930 World Series and the Athletics were victorious. The only day-to-day player in the Cardinals' lineup who was different in 1931 was the "Wild Horse of the Osage", Pepper Martin—a 27-year-old rookie who had spent seven seasons in the minor leagues. He led his team for the Series in runs scored, hits, doubles, runs batted in and stolen bases, and also made a running catch to stifle a ninth-inning rally by the A's in the final game.

The spitball pitch had been banned by Major League Baseball in 1920, but those still using it at that time were "grandfathered", or permitted to keep throwing it for the balance of their big-league careers. One of those who "wet his pill" still active in 1931 was Burleigh Grimes, with two Series starts, two wins and seven innings of no-hit pitching in Game 3. "Wild" Bill Hallahan started and won the other two for the Cards, and saved Game 7.

The Athletics had captured their third straight American League pennant, winning 107 games (and 313 for 1929–31). But this would prove to be the final World Series for longtime A's manager Connie Mack. As he did after the Boston "Miracle Braves" swept his heavily favored A's in the 1914 Series, Mack would break up this great team by selling off his best players, this time out of perceived economic necessity rather than pique and competition from the short-lived Federal League. It would be the A's last World Series appearance in Philadelphia and it would be 41 years—and two cities—later before the A's would return to the Fall Classic, after their successive moves to Kansas City in 1955 and Oakland in 1968. This would also be the city of Philadelphia's last appearance in the Series until 1950. It was also the last World Series until the 2017 edition in which both teams who had won at least 100 games in the regular season went the maximum seven games.

1931 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1931 throughout the world.

Bill Hallahan

William Anthony Hallahan (August 4, 1902 – July 8, 1981) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball during the 1920s and 1930s. Nicknamed "Wild Bill" because of his lack of control on the mound—he twice led the National League in bases on balls—Hallahan nevertheless was one of the pitching stars of the 1931 World Series and pitched his finest in postseason competition.

He also was the starting pitcher for the National League in the first All-Star Game in 1933, losing a 4–2 decision to Lefty Gomez of the American League and surrendering a third-inning home run to Babe Ruth in the process.

Ceremonial first pitch

The ceremonial first pitch is a longstanding ritual of baseball in which a guest of honor throws a ball to mark the end of pregame festivities and the start of the game. Originally, the guest threw a ball from his/her place in the grandstand to the pitcher or catcher of the home team, but the ritual changed after President Ronald Reagan threw the first pitch on the field at an unscheduled appearance at a Baltimore Orioles game. Now, the guest stands in front of the pitcher's mound and throws towards home plate. He or she may also sometimes stand on the mound (as a pitcher would). The recipient of the pitch is usually a player from the home team.

The ceremonial thrower may be a notable person (dignitary, celebrity, former player, etc.) who is in attendance, an executive from a company that sponsors the team (especially when that company has sponsored that night's promotional giveaway), or a person who won the first pitch opportunity as a contest prize. Often, especially in the minor leagues, multiple first pitches are made.

The practice of having a mayor, governor, or other local celebrity throw out ceremonial "first pitches" dates back to at least 1890. Ohio Governor (and future U.S. president) William McKinley, for example, "threw the ball into the diamond" before an opening day game between Toledo and Columbus in 1892.On April 23, 2012, the Texas Rangers executed a unique twist on the first pitch tradition. Before the Rangers' home game against the New York Yankees, the team held an official retirement ceremony for longtime catcher Iván Rodríguez. Instead of going to the pitcher's mound, he went behind home plate and threw the first "pitch" to longtime teammate Michael Young, who was standing at second base.

Eddie Collins

Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. (May 2, 1887 – March 25, 1951), nicknamed "Cocky", was an American professional baseball player, manager and executive. He played as a second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1906 to 1930 for the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox. A graduate of Columbia University, Collins holds major league career records in several categories and is among the top few players in several other categories. In 1925, Collins became just the sixth person to join the 3,000 hit club – and the last for the next 17 seasons. His 47 career home runs mark the lowest home run total for a member of the aforementioned 3,000 hit club.

Collins coached and managed in the major leagues after retiring as a player. He also served as general manager of the Boston Red Sox. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

Gabby Street

Charles Evard "Gabby" Street (September 30, 1882 – February 6, 1951), also nicknamed "The Old Sarge", was an American catcher, manager, coach, and radio broadcaster in Major League Baseball during the first half of the 20th century. As a catcher, he participated in one of the most publicized baseball stunts of the century's first decade. As a manager, he led the St. Louis Cardinals to two National League championships (1930–31) and one world title (1931). And as a broadcaster, he entertained St. Louis baseball fans in the years following World War II.

George Earnshaw

George Livingston Earnshaw (February 15, 1900 – December 1, 1976) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. He played in parts of nine seasons (1928–36) with the Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago White Sox, Brooklyn Dodgers, and St. Louis Cardinals. He was the American League wins leader in 1929 with the A's. For his career, he compiled a 127–93 record in 319 appearances, with a 4.38 ERA and 1,002 strikeouts. Earnshaw played on three American League pennant winners with the Athletics, winning the World Series in 1929 and 1930.

Born in New York City, Earnshaw grew to be 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) tall and 210 pounds (95 kg), earning him the nickname "Moose". He was aggressive, threw hard, and threw strikes. His career covered nine years with a total of 127 victories, and over half of Earnshaw's victories occurred during the A's pennant winning years 1929–31. He won four World Series games, starting eight games with five being complete games. He struck out 56 batters in 62 innings pitched and had an earn run average for the three Series of 1.58. Connie Mack gave more credit to Earnshaw for the Athletics' 1930 World Series victory over the St. Louis Cardinals than any other player.

Earnshaw did not reach the major leagues until he was 28 years old. A graduate of Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, he was a pitching star for the minor league Baltimore Orioles when Connie Mack purchased his contract in June 1928. That season, the A's finished second in the American League, 2½ games behind the Yankees. Moose had a record of 7–7 with a 3.85 ERA and 117 strikeouts in 158 innings pitched. It was in 1929 that Earnshaw and Lefty Grove began to dominate big league hitters. For the next three years, they were the only two pitchers on any one team to win 20 or more games. The 1929 season was George's turn to shine. His 24 victories against 8 losses was the most in the majors, and his 149 strikeouts were second only to teammate Grove in the American League and third in the majors. His fastball being wild at times, Earnshaw's 125 walks were an American League high, but his 3.28 ERA was among the best.

By 1936, Earnshaw's career came to an end with the St. Louis Cardinals and old nemesis Pepper Martin. Within a few years, George became a commander in the Navy in World War II. He returned to the majors for two years as a coach for the 1949–50 Philadelphia Phillies.

A better than average hitting pitcher in his 9 year major league career, Earnshaw compiled a .230 batting average (162-for-704) with 61 runs, 3 home runs and 70 RBI. In the A's three consecutive pennants in 1929 ,'30 and '31, he recorded 10, 10 and 13 RBIs respectively. However, in the eight World Series games in which he appeared, he went 0-for-22 with a run scored.

On December 1, 1976, Earnshaw died in Little Rock, Arkansas. He currently ranks seventh in Athletics franchise history in winning percentage (.627).

Gus Mancuso

August Rodney Mancuso (December 5, 1905 – October 26, 1984), nicknamed "Blackie", was an American professional baseball player, coach, scout and radio sports commentator. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball with the St. Louis Cardinals (1928, 1930–32, 1941–42), New York Giants (1933–38, 1942–44), Chicago Cubs (1939), Brooklyn Dodgers (1940) and Philadelphia Phillies (1945).Mancuso was known for his capable handling of pitching staffs and for his on-field leadership abilities. He was a member of five National League pennant-winning teams, and played as the catcher for five pitchers who were eventually inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Mancuso was regarded as one of the top defensive catchers of the 1930s.

Jim Bottomley

James Leroy Bottomley (April 23, 1900 – December 11, 1959) was an American professional baseball player. A first baseman, Bottomley played in Major League Baseball from 1922 through 1937 for the St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, and St. Louis Browns. He also served as player-manager for the Browns in 1937. Playing for the Cardinals against Brooklyn at Ebbets Field on September 16, 1924, Bottomley set the all-time single game RBI record with 12.Born in Oglesby, Illinois, Bottomley grew up in Nokomis, Illinois. He dropped out of high school at the age of 16 to raise money for his family. While he was playing semi-professional baseball, the Cardinals scouted and signed Bottomley. He won the League Award, given to the most valuable player, in 1928, and was a part of World Series championship teams in 1926 and 1931. Bottomley played for the Cardinals through the 1932 season, after which he was traded to the Reds. After playing for Cincinnati for three years, he played two more seasons with the Browns.

After finishing his playing career with the Browns, Bottomley joined the Chicago Cubs organization as a scout and minor league baseball manager. After suffering a heart attack, Bottomley and his wife retired to raise cattle in Missouri. Bottomley was nicknamed "Sunny Jim" because of his cheerful disposition. Bottomley was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974 by the Veterans Committee and to the Cardinals Hall of Fame in 2014.

Jimmy Dykes

James Joseph Dykes (November 10, 1896 – June 15, 1976) was an American third and second baseman, manager and coach in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox from 1918 to 1939. He batted over .300 five times and led the American League in assists once at second base and twice at third base, ending his career sixth in AL history in games at third base (1,253), and seventh in putouts (1,361), assists (2,403), total chances (3,952) and double plays (199).

When he retired, he ranked eighth in AL history in games played (2,282), and ninth in at bats (8,046). He holds the Athletics franchise record for career doubles (365), and formerly held team marks for career games and at bats.

He went on to become the winningest manager in White Sox history with 899 victories over 13 seasons, though his teams never finished above third place; he later became the first manager in history to win 1,000 games without capturing a league pennant.

List of World Series champions

The World Series is the annual championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB) and concludes the MLB postseason. First played in 1903, the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff and is a contest between the champions of baseball's National League (NL) and American League (AL). Often referred to as the "Fall Classic", the modern World Series has been played every year since 1903 with two exceptions: in 1904, when the NL champion New York Giants declined to play the AL champion Boston Americans; and in 1994, when the series was canceled due to the players' strike.The best-of-seven style has been the format of all World Series except in 1903, 1919, 1920, and 1921, when the winner was determined through a best-of-nine playoff. Although the large majority of contests have been played entirely during the month of October, a small number of Series have also had games played during September and November. The Series-winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy. Players, coaches and others associated with the team are generally given World Series rings to commemorate their victory; however, they have received other items such as pocket watches and medallions in the past. The winning team is traditionally invited to the White House to meet the President of the United States.

A total of 114 Series have been contested, with the NL champion winning 48 and the AL champion winning 66. The New York Yankees of the AL have played in 40 World Series through 2018—winning 27—the most Series appearances and most victories of any Major League Baseball franchise. The Los Angeles Dodgers of the NL have the most losses with 14. The St. Louis Cardinals have represented the NL 19 times, and won 11 championships, second-most among all teams and most among NL clubs. Both the Giants and the Los Angeles Dodgers have appeared in more World Series, with 20 each.

The Seattle Mariners and the Washington Nationals (formerly Montreal Expos) are the only current Major League Baseball franchises to have never appeared in a World Series; the San Diego Padres, Colorado Rockies, Texas Rangers (formerly the 1961–1971 version of the Washington Senators), Tampa Bay Rays, and Milwaukee Brewers (formerly Seattle Pilots) have all played in the Series but have never won. The Toronto Blue Jays are the only franchise from outside the United States to appear in a World Series, winning in 1992 and 1993. The Houston Astros have represented both the NL (2005) and the AL (2017), winning the Series in 2017. The current World Series champions are the Boston Red Sox.

List of World Series starting pitchers

The following chart lists starting pitchers for each Major League Baseball World Series game.Decisions listed indicate lifetime World Series W/L records as a starting pitcher; a pitcher's wins and losses in World Series relief appearances are not included here.

‡ denotes a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

List of oldest Major League Baseball players

This is a list of the oldest Major League Baseball (MLB) players, with their last season in parentheses. Only baseball players who played at least one game when they were older than 45 are included on the list. Active are players in bold type.

Showboat Fisher

George Aloys "Showboat" Fisher (January 16, 1899 – May 15, 1994) was a baseball player who played in the 1930 World Series with the St. Louis Cardinals. He had a .335 lifetime batting average in Major League Baseball. He played several games for the racially integrated Jamestown Red Sox in 1934 under the management of Ted Radcliffe.

He was the last surviving member of the 1924 Washington Senators, the only Washington, D.C.-based baseball team to win a World Series.

Wally Schang

Walter Henry (Wally) Schang (August 22, 1889 – March 6, 1965) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. From 1913 through 1931, he played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1913–17, 1930), Boston Red Sox (1918–20), New York Yankees (1921–25), St. Louis Browns (1926–29) and Detroit Tigers (1931). Schang was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He was born in South Wales, New York.

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