1928 Boston Red Sox season

The 1928 Boston Red Sox season was the 28th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 57 wins and 96 losses.

1928 Boston Red Sox
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)J.A. Robert Quinn
Manager(s)Bill Carrigan
Local radioWNAC
(Fred Hoey)
< Previous season     Next season >

Regular season

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB
New York Yankees 101 53 .656 --
Philadelphia Athletics 98 55 .641
St. Louis Browns 82 72 .532 19
Washington Senators 75 79 .487 26
Chicago White Sox 72 82 .468 29
Detroit Tigers 68 86 .442 33
Cleveland Indians 62 92 .403 39
Boston Red Sox 57 96 .373 43½

Record vs. opponents

1928 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS CWS CLE DET NYY PHI STL WSH
Boston 10–12 9–13 7–15 6–16 3–18 9–13 13–9–1
Chicago 12–10 12–10–1 13–9 9–13 6–16 10–12 10–12
Cleveland 13–9 10–12–1 10–12 6–16 6–16 7–15 10–12
Detroit 15–7 9–13 12–10 7–15 8–14 9–13 8–14
New York 16–6 13–9 16–6 15–7 16–6 12–10 13–9
Philadelphia 18–3 16–6 16–6 14–8 6–16 16–6 12–10
St. Louis 13–9 12–10 15–7 13–9 10–12 6–16 13–9
Washington 9–13–1 12–10 12–10 14–8 9–13 10–12 9–13

Opening Day lineup

BuddyMyerGoudeycard
All Star Buddy Myer
Jack Rothrock SS
Phil Todt 1B
Ira Flagstead CF
Ken Williams LF
Buddy Myer 3B
Bill Regan 2B
Doug Taitt RF
Fred Hofmann C
Danny MacFayden P

Notable transactions

Roster

1928 Boston Red Sox
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Fred Hofmann 78 199 45 .226 0 16
1B Phil Todt 144 539 136 .252 12 73
2B Bill Regan 138 511 135 .264 7 75
OF Ken Williams 133 462 140 .303 8 67
OF Doug Taitt 143 482 144 .299 3 61
OF Ira Flagstead 140 510 148 .290 1 39

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Jack Rothrock 117 344 92 .267 3 22

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Herb Bradley 15 47.1 0 3 7.23 14

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
John Wilson 2 0 0 0 9.00 1
Jack Rothrock 1 0 0 0 0.00 0
Frank Bennett 1 0 0 0 0.00 0
Doug Taitt 1 0 0 0 27.00 1

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
B Salem Witches New England League Stuffy McInnis

[2]

Notes

  1. ^ Wally Gerber page at Baseball Reference
  2. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd edition. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 2007

References

Doug Taitt

Douglas John Taitt [Poco] (August 3, 1902 – December 12, 1970) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball and a player/manager in the Minor leagues. Listed at 6' 0, 176 lb., he batted left-handed and threw right-handed.A native of Bay City, Michigan, Taitt spent 23 years in baseball (1925–1947), including four major league seasons between 1928 and 1932.Taitt entered the majors in 1928 with the Boston Red Sox, playing for them through the 1929 midseason before joining the Chicago White Sox (1929) and Philadelphia Phillies (1931–1932). His most productive season came in his rookie year for Boston, when he posted career-numbers in games (143), hits (144), doubles (28), triples, stolen bases (13) and on-base percentage (.350), while hitting a .299 average with 51 runs scored and 61 runs batted in, also career-highs. Inexplicably, he faded after that and was relegated to a backup role.In a four-season career, Taitt was a .263 hitter (217-for-824) with three home runs and 95 RBI in 258 games, including 81 runs, 43 doubles, 16 triples and 13 stolen bases. In 228 outfield appearances (58 at left field) he posted a collective .975 fielding percentage (12 errors in 479 chances).Following his brief stint in major leagues Taitt resumed his career in the minors. In 1931 he led the Southern Association in hits (194), home runs (17) and triples (19), and also topped the league with a .355 average in 1935 and with 20 home runs and 132 RBI a year later. He collected 2,150 hits in his minor league career, while batting .331 with 107 home runs and a slugging of .500 in 1874 games.He later managed from 1938 through 1947, leading the Monroe White Sox of the Cotton States League to three division titles (1939–1941) and two league championships (1938, 1940).Taitt died in 1970 in Portland, Oregon, at the age of 68.

Freddie Moncewicz

Frederick Alfred Moncewicz (September 1, 1903 – April 23, 1969) was a backup shortstop in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the Boston Red Sox. Listed at 5 ft 8.5 in (1.74 m). 175 lb., Moncewicz batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Brockton, Massachusetts.

Little is known about this player who appeared in three games for the Red Sox during the 1928 season. Moncewicz starred at Brockton High School and Boston College and later played semi-pro baseball in local teams. He went hitless in one at-bat (.000) in three games for Boston, two of them in pinch-running duties.

Following his baseball career, Moncewicz was named to the post of comptroller by Boston mayor Maurice J. Tobin in 1946, serving continuously until 1958, when he retired by health reasons.

Moncewicz died at the age of 65 in his homeland of Brockton, Massachusetts.

John Shea (baseball)

John Michael Joseph Shea [Lefty] (December 27, 1904 – November 30, 1956) was a relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the Boston Red Sox during the 1928 season. Shea batted and threw left-handed. A native of Everett, Massachusetts, he attended Boston College.

On June 30, 1928 he made his only Major League appearance, a relief appearance against the New York Yankees at Fenway Park. He allowed two runs and one hit, giving one walk without strikeouts in one inning of work for an 18.00 ERA. He did not have a decision and never appeared in a major league game again.

Marty Griffin (baseball)

Martin John Griffin (September 2, 1901 – November 19, 1951) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the Boston Red Sox during the 1928 season. Listed at 6' 2", 200 lb., Griffin batted and threw right-handed. He was born in San Francisco, California.

In one season career, Griffin posted a 0-3 record with a 5.02 ERA in 11 appearances, including three starts nine strikeouts, 17 walks, 42 hits allowed, and 37⅔ innings of work.

Griffin died at the age of 50 in Los Angeles, California.

Steve Slayton

Foster Herbert Slayton (April 26, 1902 – December 20, 1984) was a relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the Boston Red Sox during the 1928 season. Listed at 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m), 163 lb., Slayton batted and threw right-handed. A native of Barre, Vermont, he attended University of New Hampshire.

Slayton allowed three runs and six hits in three relief appearances for a 3.86 ERA, giving one walk and two strikeouts in seven innings of work, without a decision or saves.

Slayton died at the age of 82 in Manchester, New Hampshire.

American League
National League
Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Administration
World Series
Championships (9)
League
Pennants (14)
Division championships (10)
Wild card berths (7)
Minor league
affiliates
Broadcasting

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.