1928–29 NHL season

The 1928–29 NHL season was the 12th season of the National Hockey League. Ten teams played 44 games each. This was the first Stanley Cup final that saw two United States-based teams compete for the cup. The Boston Bruins defeated the New York Rangers two games to none in the best-of-three final.

1928–29 NHL season
LeagueNational Hockey League
SportIce hockey
DurationNovember 15, 1928 – March 29, 1929
Number of games44
Number of teams10
Regular season
Season championsMontreal Canadiens
Season MVPRoy Worters (Americans)
Top scorerAce Bailey (Maple Leafs)
Canadian Division championsMontreal Canadiens
American Division championsBoston Bruins
Stanley Cup
ChampionsBoston Bruins
  Runners-upNew York Rangers

League business

Notable rule changes

Forward passing was permitted from the neutral zone across the blue line into the attacking zone, as long as no offensive player preceded the puck into the attacking zone; forward passing within the attacking zone was still forbidden. Regular season overtime was changed to a 10-minute, non-sudden-death format, to be played in its entirety.

Regular season

Ottawa continued in financial trouble and sold Punch Broadbent to the New York Americans. They continued to erode, and at one point, rumour had it that they would be sold to a Chicago group. Frank Ahearn, the Senators owner, denied this, but admitted that the team was for sale to the highest bidder.

The New York Americans, last place finishers in 1927–28, surprised everyone by occupying first place for much of the season in the Canadian Division. They were held up by the great play of defenceman Lionel Conacher and goaltender Roy Worters. However, the Montreal Canadiens dislodged the Americans and finished first. Boston, led by rookie Tiny Thompson in goal, led the American Division.

Bruins' player George Owen was the first NHL player to regularly wear headgear for protective purposes. Prior to this, the only time protective headgear was worn was to temporarily protect injuries. Fifty-one years later the NHL mandated the use of helmets. Craig MacTavish was the last NHL player to not wear a helmet, retiring in 1997.

The Chicago Black Hawks set records for goal scoring futility, scoring on average less than one goal per game (33), while giving up a league worst 85 goals against. In one stretch from February 7 through February 28, the Hawks were shut out in eight consecutive games.[1] Forward Vic Ripley was the Hawks' leading goal scorer with only 11 goals and 2 assists for 13 points for the entire 44-game season.[2]

The season produced a record 120 shutouts in the 220 games played. George Hainsworth, Canadiens goaltender, set an NHL record that remains unmatched through the 2015–16 season of 22 shutouts and a 0.92 goals against average. Seven other goaltenders hit double digits in shutouts.[1]

Final standings

Canadian Division
GP W L T GF GA PIM Pts
Montreal Canadiens 44 22 7 15 71 43 465 59
New York Americans 44 19 13 12 53 53 486 50
Toronto Maple Leafs 44 21 18 5 85 69 541 47
Ottawa Senators 44 14 17 13 54 67 461 41
Montreal Maroons 44 15 20 9 67 65 638 39
American Division
GP W L T GF GA PIM Pts
Boston Bruins 44 26 13 5 89 52 472 57
New York Rangers 44 21 13 10 72 65 384 52
Detroit Cougars 44 19 16 9 72 63 381 47
Pittsburgh Pirates 44 9 27 8 46 80 324 26
Chicago Black Hawks 44 7 29 8 33 85 363 22


Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, Pts = Points, GF = Goals For, GA = Goals Against, PIM = Penalties in minutes

Note: Teams that qualified for the playoffs are highlighted in bold

Playoffs

The playoff format was revised to match the divisional first-place teams in a best-of-five semifinal. The divisional second-place teams and third-place teams played off in a two-game total-goals series to determine the participants for the other best-of-three semifinal. The semifinal winners then played off in a best-of-three series for the Cup.

Playoff bracket

  Quarterfinals Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
                           
     
  C1 Mtl Canadiens 0  
    A1 Boston 3  
   
       
    A1 Boston 2
  A2 NY Rangers 0
  C2 NY Americans 0G  
A2 NY Rangers 1G  
A2 NY Rangers 2
    C3 Toronto 0  
C3 Toronto 7G
  A3 Detroit 2G  

Quarterfinals

(A2) New York Rangers vs. (C2) New York Americans

New York Rangers won series on total goals 1–0

(C3) Toronto Maple Leafs vs. (A3) Detroit Cougars

Toronto won the series on total goals 7–2

Semifinals

(C1) Montreal Canadiens vs. (A1) Boston Bruins

Boston won series 3–0

(A2) New York Rangers vs. (C3) Toronto Maple Leafs

New York won series 2–0

Stanley Cup Finals

The Bruins won their first Stanley Cup defeating the Rangers. In the process, Boston became one of the few Cup winners in history to not lose a single game in the playoffs, and the last team until 1952 to go undefeated in the playoffs.

Boston won series 2–0

Awards

Frank Boucher won his second consecutive Lady Byng award and George Hainsworth won his third consecutive Vezina Trophy.

1928–29 NHL awards
O'Brien Cup:
(Canadian Division champion)
Montreal Canadiens
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(American Division champion)
Boston Bruins
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Roy Worters, New York Americans
Lady Byng Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Frank Boucher, New York Rangers
Vezina Trophy:
(Fewest goals allowed)
George Hainsworth, Montreal Canadiens

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

PLAYER TEAM GP G A PTS PIM
Ace Bailey Toronto Maple Leafs 44 22 10 32 78
Nels Stewart Montreal Maroons 44 21 8 29 74
Carson Cooper Detroit Cougars 43 18 9 27 14
Howie Morenz Montreal Canadiens 42 17 10 27 47
Andy Blair Toronto Maple Leafs 44 12 15 27 41
Frank Boucher New York Rangers 44 10 16 26 8
Harry Oliver Boston Bruins 43 17 6 23 24
Bill Cook New York Rangers 43 15 8 23 41
Jimmy Ward Montreal Maroons 44 14 8 22 46
Frank Finnigan Ottawa Senators 44 15 4 19 71

Source: NHL.[3]

Leading goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; Mins = Minutes played; GA = Goals against; SO = Shutouts; GAA = Goals against average

Player Team GP W L T Mins GA SO GAA
George Hainsworth Montreal Canadiens 44 22 7 15 2800 43 22 0.92
Tiny Thompson Boston Bruins 44 26 13 5 2710 52 12 1.15
Roy Worters New York Americans 44 16 12 10 2390 46 13 1.15
Dolly Dolson Detroit Cougars 38 19 16 9 2750 63 10 1.37
John Ross Roach New York Rangers 44 21 13 10 2760 65 13 1.41

Source: hockey-reference.com[4]

Coaches

American Division

Canadian Division

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1928–29 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1928–29 (listed with their last team):

See also

References

  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X.
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5.
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9.
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1973). The Story of the National Hockey League. New York, NY: Pagurian Press. ISBN 0-684-13424-1.
Notes
  1. ^ a b Dryden 2000, p. 31.
  2. ^ MacFarlane, Brian. "Worst NHL Team Ever". Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  3. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 146.
  4. ^ "1928–29 NHL Season Goalie Statistics". hockey-reference.com. Retrieved January 5, 2011.

External links

1928–29 Boston Bruins season

The 1928–29 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' fifth season in the NHL. Boston defended its American Division title, and went on to defeat the New York Rangers in the Final to become the third American-based team to become Stanley Cup champions.

1928–29 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1928–29 Chicago Black Hawks season was the team's third season of play. The Hawks would miss the playoffs for the second straight season.

1928–29 Detroit Cougars season

The 1928–29 Detroit Cougars season was the third season of play for the Detroit National Hockey League franchise. The Cougars placed third in the American Division to advance to the playoffs for the first time. The Cougars lost in the first round to the Toronto Maple Leafs.

1928–29 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1928–29 Montreal Canadiens season was the team's 20th season, and 12th in the National Hockey League (NHL). The team repeated its first-place finish in the Canadian Division and qualified for the playoffs. The Canadiens lost in the semi-finals against the Boston Bruins.

1928–29 Montreal Maroons season

The 1928–29 Montreal Maroons season was the 5th season for the National Hockey League franchise.

1928–29 New York Americans season

The 1928–29 New York Americans season was the fourth season of play of the Americans. After finishing out of the playoffs in the first three seasons, the team placed second in its division to make the playoffs for the first time. The team met the New York Rangers for a two-game total-goals series. The series was won by the Rangers, the only goal an over-time goal in the second game.

1928–29 New York Rangers season

The 1928–29 New York Rangers season was the third season for the team in the National Hockey League. During the regular season, the Rangers finished in second place in the American Division with a 21–13–10 record and qualified for the Stanley Cup playoffs. In the postseason, the Rangers won series against the New York Americans and Toronto Maple Leafs to reach the Stanley Cup Finals. where they lost to the Boston Bruins 2–0.

1928–29 Ottawa Senators season

The 1928–29 Ottawa Senators season was the club's 12th season in the NHL, 44th over-all. The Senators financial troubles would continue, as the team sold Punch Broadbent to the New York Americans. There were numerous rumours that the team was going to be sold to a group from Chicago, however Senators owner Frank Ahearn denied this, but admitted that the team was for sale to the highest bidder. Once again, for the second straight year, the Senators would play two "home" games in Detroit due to poor fan support when US-based teams would play games in Ottawa.

1928–29 Pittsburgh Pirates (NHL) season

The 1928–29 Pittsburgh Pirates (NHL) season was the fourth season of the Pirates ice hockey team in the National Hockey League.

1928–29 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1928–29 Toronto Maple Leafs season featured the Maple Leafs first play-off appearance. After finishing in third position in the Canadian Division, the Maple Leafs defeated the Detroit Cougars before losing to the New York Rangers in the semi-finals.

1929 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1929 Stanley Cup Finals was played by the defending champion New York Rangers and the Boston Bruins. This was the first time in Stanley Cup history that two American-based teams met in the Final. Boston won the series to win its first championship.

Chicago Coliseum

The Chicago Coliseums were three large indoor arenas in Chicago, Illinois, which stood successively from the 1860s to 1982; they served as venues for sports events, large (national-class) conventions and as exhibition halls. The first Coliseum stood at State and Washington streets in Chicago's downtown in the late 1860s. The second, at 63rd Street near Stony Island Avenue in the south side's Woodlawn community, hosted the 1896 Democratic National Convention. The third Chicago Coliseum was located at 15th Street and Wabash Avenue on the near south side; it hosted five consecutive Republican National Conventions, (1904, 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920) and the Progressive Party National Convention in 1912 and 1916. In the 1960s and early 1970s it served as a general admission venue for rock concerts, roller derbys and professional wrestling matches; it closed in 1971 and was sold for redevelopment in 1982, however portions of the building remained standing until the early 1990s.

Farrand Gillie

Farrand Douglas Gillie (May 11, 1905 – October 7, 1972) was a Canadian professional ice hockey left winger who played in one National Hockey League game for the Detroit Cougars during the 1928–29 NHL season.

Herb Gardiner

Herbert Martin Gardiner (May 8, 1891 – January 11, 1972) was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman who played for the Calgary Tigers of the Western Canada Hockey League (WCHL) and the Montreal Canadiens and Chicago Black Hawks of the National Hockey League (NHL). Additionally, he was the head coach of the Black Hawks for part of the 1928–29 NHL season. Gardiner was a member of the WCHL champion Tigers in 1924 and in 1927 won the Hart Trophy as the NHL's most valuable player after playing every minute of every game for the Canadiens. He coached several minor professional teams in Philadelphia following his retirement as a player. Gardiner was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1958.

New York Americans

The New York Americans, colloquially known as the Amerks, were a professional ice hockey team based in New York City, New York from 1925 to 1942. They were the third expansion team in the history of the National Hockey League (NHL) and the second to play in the United States. The team never won the Stanley Cup, but reached the semifinals twice. While it was the first team in New York City, it was eclipsed by the second, the New York Rangers, which arrived in 1926 under the ownership of the Amerks' landlord, Madison Square Garden. The team operated as the Brooklyn Americans during the 1941–42 season before suspending operations in 1942 due to World War II and long-standing financial difficulties. The demise of the club marked the beginning of the NHL's Original Six era from 1942 to 1967, though the Amerks' franchise was not formally canceled until 1946.

The team's overall regular season record was 255–402–127.

Peace Bridge Arena

Peace Bridge Arena was the main sports arena located in Fort Erie, Ontario. Built in 1928, it held 5,000 people. It was located near the Peace Bridge connecting Fort Erie with Buffalo, New York. Both the Chicago Black Hawks and Pittsburgh Pirates made the arena a temporary home for the first few games during the 1928–29 NHL season.

The arena was also the home of the Buffalo Bisons ice hockey team; for a brief period in 1931, it also served as the backup arena for their crosstown rivals, the Buffalo Majors, who normally played at Buffalo Broadway Auditorium. On March 17, 1936, the roof collapsed after thirteen inches of heavy snowfall, which ensured the original hockey Bisons' demise.

Eventually, in 1940, Buffalo Memorial Auditorium, on the American side of the border, would open, replacing both Broadway Auditorium and Peace Bridge Arena; with it, a new Bisons team would be established.

Vezina Trophy

The Vezina Trophy is awarded annually to the National Hockey League's (NHL) goaltender who is "adjudged to be the best at this position". At the end of each season, the thirty-one NHL general managers vote to determine the winner. It is named in honour of Georges Vezina, goaltender of the Montreal Canadiens from 1910 until 1925, who died in 1926 of tuberculosis. The trophy was first awarded after the 1926–27 NHL season and was awarded to the top goaltender. From 1946–47 to 1981–82, the trophy went to the goaltender(s) of the team allowing the fewest goals during the regular season; now, the William M. Jennings Trophy is awarded for this.

The most recent winner is the Nashville Predators' Pekka Rinne in the 2017–18 season.

Wilfred White (ice hockey)

Wilfred Belmont "Tex" White (June 26, 1900 – December 2, 1948) was a Canadian professional ice hockey forward who played seven seasons in the National Hockey League for the Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Americans and Philadelphia Quakers.

March 19 New York Rangers 0–0 New York Americans Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
John Ross Roach Goalie stats Roy Worters
March 21 New York Americans 0–1 2OT New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
No scoring Second overtime period 19:50 – Butch Keeling (1)
Roy Worters Goalie stats John Ross Roach
March 19 Toronto Maple Leafs 3–1 Detroit Cougars Olympia Stadium Recap  
Andy Blair (1) – 01:35
Art Smith (1) – 18:35
First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 16:35 – George Hay (1)
Andy Blair (2) – 18:07 Third period No scoring
Lorne Chabot Goalie stats Dolly Dolson
March 21 Detroit Cougars 1–4 Toronto Maple Leafs Arena Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period 06:45 – Hap Day (1)
08:30 – Eric Pettinger (1)
No scoring Second period 18:00 – Red Horner (1)
Larry Aurie (1) – 18:50 Third period 19:59 – Ace Bailey (1)
Dolly Dolson Goalie stats Lorne Chabot
March 19 Montreal Canadiens 0–1 Boston Bruins Boston Madison Square Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 04:00 – Cooney Weiland (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
George Hainsworth Goalie stats Tiny Thompson
March 21 Montreal Canadiens 0–1 Boston Bruins Boston Madison Square Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 06:13 – Cooney Weiland (2)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
George Hainsworth Goalie stats Tiny Thompson
March 23 Boston Bruins 3–2 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 09:27 – Albert Leduc (1)
09:36 – Aurele Joliat (1)
Bill Carson (1) – 09:36
Dutch Gainor (1) – 13:58
Eddie Shore (1) – 14:49
Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Tiny Thompson Goalie stats George Hainsworth
March 24 Toronto Maple Leafs 0–1 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period 07:33 – Butch Keeling (2)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Lorne Chabot Goalie stats John Ross Roach
March 26 New York Rangers 2–1 OT Toronto Maple Leafs Arena Gardens Recap  
Bun Cook (1) – 04:35 First period 03:05 – Andy Blair (3)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Frank Boucher (1) – 02:05 First overtime period No scoring
John Ross Roach Goalie stats Lorne Chabot
March 28 New York Rangers 0–2 Boston Bruins Boston Madison Square Garden Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 02:00 – Dit Clapper (1)
10:00 – Dutch Gainor (2)
No scoring Third period No scoring
John Ross Roach Goalie stats Tiny Thompson
March 29 Boston Bruins 2–1 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Harry Oliver (1) – 14:01 Second period No scoring
Bill Carson (2) – 18:02 Third period 06:48 – Butch Keeling (3)
Tiny Thompson Goalie stats John Ross Roach
1928–29 NHL season
Canadian Division
American Division
See also
1910s
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

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