1927 New York Yankees season

The 1927 New York Yankees season was their 25th season. The team finished with a record of 110–44, winning their fifth pennant and finishing 19 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics and were tied for first or better for the whole season.[1] New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Pittsburgh Pirates. This Yankees team was known for their feared lineup, which was nicknamed "Murderers' Row", and is widely considered to be the greatest baseball team in MLB history.[2][3][4]

1927 New York Yankees
Babe Ruth hits 60 homers
American League Champions
World Series Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Jacob Ruppert
General manager(s)Ed Barrow
Manager(s)Miller Huggins
Local televisionnone
Local radionone
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Regular season

Yankee Stadium 1927
Yankee Stadium in 1927.

The Yankees' 110 victories broke the previous American League mark of 105 (set by the 1912 Boston Red Sox) and would stand as the American League single-season record until it was broken by the Cleveland Indians in 1954.

This was the first year the Yankees acknowledged their team nickname on their uniforms, albeit their road uniforms. Their home uniforms remained free of any kind of logo except for the "NY" on their caps.

The roster included seven future Hall of Famers: Pitchers Herb Pennock and Waite Hoyt, Infielders Lou Gehrig and Tony Lazzeri, outfielders Babe Ruth and Earle Combs, and Manager Miller Huggins.

Babe Ruth

With the race long since decided, the nation's attention turned to Babe Ruth's pursuit of his own home run mark of 59, set in 1921. Early in the season, Ruth expressed doubts about his chances: "I don't suppose I'll ever break that 1921 record. To do that, you've got to start early, and the pitchers have got to pitch to you. I don't start early, and the pitchers haven't really pitched to me in four seasons. I get more bad balls to hit than any other five men...and fewer good ones." Ruth was also being challenged for his slugger's crown by teammate Lou Gehrig, who nudged ahead of Ruth's total in midseason, prompting the New York World-Telegram to anoint Gehrig the favorite. But Ruth caught Gehrig (who would finish with 47), and then had a remarkable last leg of the season, hitting 17 home runs in September. His 60th came on September 30, in the Yankees' next-to-last game. Ruth was exultant, shouting after the game, "Sixty, count 'em, sixty! Let's see some other son of a bitch match that!"[5] In later years, he would give Gehrig some credit: "Pitchers began pitching to me because if they passed me they still had Lou to contend with." In addition to his career-high 60 home runs, Ruth batted .356, drove in 164 runs and slugged .772.

Babe Ruth's 60 home runs

HR Date Pitcher
1 April 15, 1927 Howard Ehmke
2 April 23, 1927 Rube Walberg
3 April 24, 1927 Sloppy Thurston
4 April 29, 1927 Slim Harriss
5 May 1, 1927 Jack Quinn
6 May 1, 1927 Rube Walberg
7 May 10, 1927 Milt Gaston
8 May 11, 1927 Ernie Nevers
9 May 17, 1927 Rip Collins
10 May 22, 1927 Benn Karr
11 May 23, 1927 Sloppy Thurston
12 May 28, 1927 Sloppy Thurston
13 May 29, 1927 Danny MacFayden
14 May 30, 1927 Rube Walberg
15 May 31, 1927 Jack Quinn
16 May 31, 1927 Howard Ehmke
17 June 5, 1927 Earl Whitehill
18 June 7, 1927 Tommy Thomas
19 June 11, 1927 Garland Buckeye
20 June 11, 1927 Garland Buckeye
21 June 12, 1927 George Uhle
22 June 16, 1927 Tom Zachary
23 June 22, 1927 Hal Wiltse
24 June 22, 1927 Hal Wiltse
25 June 30, 1927 Slim Harriss
26 July 3, 1927 Hod Lisenbee
27 July 8, 1927 Don Hankins
28 July 9, 1927 Ken Holloway
29 July 9, 1927 Ken Holloway
30 July 12, 1927 Joe Shaute
31 July 24, 1927 Tommy Thomas
32 July 26, 1927 Milt Gaston
33 July 27, 1927 Milt Gaston
34 July 28, 1927 Lefty Stewart
35 August 5, 1927 George Smith
36 August 10, 1927 Tom Zachary
37 August 16, 1927 Tommy Thomas
38 August 17, 1927 Sarge Connally
39 August 20, 1927 Jake Miller
40 August 22, 1927 Joe Shaute
41 August 27, 1927 Ernie Nevers
42 August 28, 1927 Ernie Wingard
43 August 31, 1927 Tony Welzer
44 September 2, 1927 Rube Walberg
45 September 6, 1927 Tony Welzer
46 September 6, 1927 Tony Welzer
47 September 6, 1927 Jack Russell
48 September 7, 1927 Danny MacFayden
49 September 7, 1927 Slim Harriss
50 September 11, 1927 Milt Gaston
51 September 13, 1927 Willis Hudlin
52 September 13, 1927 Joe Shaute
53 September 16, 1927 Ted Blankenship
54 September 18, 1927 Ted Lyons
55 September 21, 1927 Sam Gibson
56 September 22, 1927 Ken Holloway
57 September 27, 1927 Lefty Grove
58 September 29, 1927 Hod Lisenbee
59 September 29, 1927 Paul Hopkins
60 September 30, 1927 Tom Zachary

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Yankees 110 44 0.714 57–19 53–25
Philadelphia Athletics 91 63 0.591 19 50–27 41–36
Washington Senators 85 69 0.552 25 51–28 34–41
Detroit Tigers 82 71 0.536 27½ 44–32 38–39
Chicago White Sox 70 83 0.458 39½ 38–37 32–46
Cleveland Indians 66 87 0.431 43½ 35–42 31–45
St. Louis Browns 59 94 0.386 50½ 38–38 21–56
Boston Red Sox 51 103 0.331 59 29–49 22–54

Record vs. opponents

1927 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS CWS CLE DET NYY PHI STL WSH
Boston 11–11 15–7 5–17 4–18 6–16 6–16 4–18
Chicago 11–11 8–14 13–8 5–17 8–14 15–7 10–12
Cleveland 7–15 14–8 7–15 10–12 10–12 10–11 8–14
Detroit 17–5 8–13 15–7 8–14 9–13 14–8–1 11–11–2
New York 18–4 17–5 12–10 14–8 14–8–1 21–1 14–8
Philadelphia 16–6 14–8 12–10 13–9 8–14–1 16–6 12–10
St. Louis 16–6 7–15 11–10 8–14–1 1–21 6–16 10–12–1
Washington 18–4 12–10 14–8 11–11–2 8–14 10–12 12–10–1

Roster

1927 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Pat Collins 92 251 69 .275 7 36
1B Lou Gehrig 155 584 218 .373 47 175
2B Tony Lazzeri 153 570 176 .309 18 102
3B Joe Dugan 112 387 104 .269 2 43
SS Mark Koenig 123 526 150 .285 3 62
OF Earle Combs 152 648 231 .356 6 64
OF Babe Ruth 151 540 192 .356 60 164
OF Bob Meusel 135 516 174 .337 8 103

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Johnny Grabowski 70 195 54 .277 0 25
Ray Morehart 73 195 50 .256 1 20
Cedric Durst 65 129 32 .248 0 25
Mike Gazella 54 115 32 .278 0 9
Benny Bengough 31 85 21 .247 0 10
Ben Paschal 50 82 26 .317 2 16
Julie Wera 38 42 10 .238 1 8

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Waite Hoyt 36 256.1 22 7 2.63 86
Urban Shocker 31 200 18 6 2.84 35
Herb Pennock 34 209.2 19 8 3.00 51
Dutch Ruether 27 184 13 6 3.38 45
George Pipgras 29 166.1 10 3 4.11 81

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Wilcy Moore 50 213 19 7 2.28 75
Myles Thomas 21 88.2 7 4 4.87 25

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Bob Shawkey 19 2 3 4 2.89 23
Joe Giard 16 0 0 0 8.00 10
Walter Beall 1 0 0 0 9.00 0

1927 World Series

Game Date Visitor Score Home Score Record

(NYY-PIT)

Attendance
1 October 5 New York Yankees 5 Pittsburgh Pirates 4 1–0 41,467
2 October 6 New York Yankees 6 Pittsburgh Pirates 2 2–0 41,634
3 October 7 Pittsburgh Pirates 1 New York Yankees 8 3–0 60,695
4 October 8 Pittsburgh Pirates 3 New York Yankees 4 4–0 57,909
New York Yankees win 4–0

Awards and honors

Since a voter could select only one player per team, two good candidates from the same team could find their votes split and both of their chances of winning hurt. In addition, the clause prohibiting repeat winners led to unusual results like Babe Ruth's 1927 (one of the greatest offensive seasons of all time) not being eligible for the award. As The New York Times wrote in 1925, "[T]he purpose, of course, is to pass the honor around, but the effect is to pass an empty honor around."[6]

League leaders

Franchise records

  • Earle Combs, Yankees single season record, triples in a season (23)

In popular culture

In 2016, ESPN announced 1927: The Diary of Myles Thomas, part a new genre of storytelling known as "real-time historical fiction."[8] The core of the project is a historical novel in the form of a diary of Myles Thomas, written by Douglas Alden, complemented by a wealth of fact-based content from the season, all published along the same timeline as the events unfolded almost 90 years ago. Through Myles Thomas's diary entries, additional essays and real-time social-media components (including Twitter[9]) "re-living" that famous Yankees season, the goal is to explore the rarefied nexus of baseball, jazz and Prohibition — defining elements of the remarkable world that existed in 1927. The diary runs the length of the full 1927 season, from April 13 through October 10, 1927.[10]

Notes

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/NYY/1927-schedule-scores.shtml
  2. ^ "Tom Verducci's Top 10 Teams of All Time". SportsIllustrated.com https://www.si.com/mlb/photos/2010/03/30tom-verduccis-top-10-teams-of-all-time/1
  3. ^ "The Best Major League Baseball Team Ever from 1902–2005". BaseballAlmanac.com. http://www.baseball-almanac.com/articles/best_major_league_teams_ever.shtml
  4. ^ Bryson, Bill (2013), One Summer: America 1927, Doubleday, ISBN 978-0767919401, OCLC 841198242
  5. ^ Creamer, Robert W. (1974). Babe: The Legend Comes to Life. Holtzman Press. p. 400. ISBN 978-0671760700. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  6. ^ "Review-The Week In Sports-Outlook". (September 28, 1925). The New York Times, Sports, p. 17.
  7. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p.98, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  8. ^ 1927: The Diary of Myles Thomas
  9. ^ 1927: The Diary of Myles Thomas on Twitter
  10. ^ About the Diary of Myles Thomas

References

1927 New York Yankees (NFL) season

The 1927 New York Yankees season was their inaugural season in the league. The team finished 7–8–1, and finished sixth in the league.

George Smith (American League pitcher)

George Shelby Smith (October 27, 1901 – May 26, 1981) was a middle relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1926 through 1930 for the Detroit Tigers (1926–1929) and Boston Red Sox (1930). Listed at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 175 lb., Smith batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky.

In a four-season career, Smith posted 10–8 record with a 5.28 ERA in 132 appearances, including seven starts, one complete game, saves, 135 strikeouts, and 330⅔ innings of work.

He gave up one of Babe Ruth's record-setting 60 home runs during the 1927 New York Yankees season.

Smith died at the age of 79 in Richmond, Virginia.

Lefty Stewart

Walter Cleveland "Lefty" Stewart (September 23, 1900 in Sparta, Tennessee – September 26, 1974 in Knoxville, Tennessee) was a professional baseball pitcher. He played all or part of ten seasons in Major League Baseball between 1921 and 1935. He played for the Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, and Cleveland Indians.

Stewart gave up one of Babe Ruth's record-setting 60 home runs during the 1927 New York Yankees season.

Milt Gaston

Nathaniel Milton Gaston (January 27, 1896 – April 26, 1996) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1924 to 1934. Born in Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, he played for the St. Louis Browns, New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, Washington Senators and Chicago White Sox. He died at age 100 in Barnstable, Massachusetts. His older brother, Alex, was his batterymate with the 1929 Red Sox. Danny MacFayden was his brother-in-law.

His first roommate in the majors was Lou Gehrig when he played for the New York Yankees.

Three of Babe Ruth's record-setting home runs during the 1927 New York Yankees season were hit off Gaston, on July 26, July 27 and Sept. 11.

Gaston's career record was 97–164. He is the major league record holder for most games under .500 in a career.A good hitting pitcher in his 11-year major league career, he posted a .200 batting average (145-for-724) with 55 runs, 6 home runs and 75 RBI.

Murderers' Row

Murderers' Row were the baseball teams of the New York Yankees in the late 1920s, widely considered one of the best teams in history. The nickname is in particular describing the first six hitters in the 1927 team lineup: Earle Combs, Mark Koenig, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Bob Meusel, and Tony Lazzeri.

Tony Welzer

Anton Frank Welzer (April 5, 1899 – March 18, 1971) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1926 through 1927 for the Boston Red Sox. Listed at 5' 11", 160 lb., he batted and threw right-handed.

Welzer, the third German to play for the Red Sox, entered in the majors as a member of the hapless Red Sox teams that lost 107 games in 1926 and 103 in 1927. His 4–3 mark in his rookie season represented the only winning record in the Boston pitching staff. A year later he went 6–11, ending third behind Slim Harriss (14–21) and Hal Wiltze (10–18), as nobody on the team had a winning record.

Welzer gave up the 43rd, 45th and 46th home runs of Babe Ruth's record-setting 60 during a single week of the 1927 New York Yankees season.

In a two-season career, Welzer posted a 10–14 record with 85 strikeouts and a 4.78 ERA in 76 appearances, including 25 starts, nine complete games, one shutout, and 310⅔ innings of work.

Welzer died at the age of 71 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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