1926 Boston Red Sox season

The 1926 Boston Red Sox season was the 26th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 46 wins and 107 losses.

1926 Boston Red Sox
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)J.A. Robert Quinn
Manager(s)Lee Fohl
Local radioWNAC
(Fred Hoey)
< Previous season     Next season >

Regular season

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Yankees 91 63 0.591 50–25 41–38
Cleveland Indians 88 66 0.571 3 49–31 39–35
Philadelphia Athletics 83 67 0.553 6 44–27 39–40
Washington Senators 81 69 0.540 8 42–30 39–39
Chicago White Sox 81 72 0.529 47–31 34–41
Detroit Tigers 79 75 0.513 12 39–41 40–34
St. Louis Browns 62 92 0.403 29 40–39 22–53
Boston Red Sox 46 107 0.301 44½ 25–51 21–56

Record vs. opponents

1926 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS CWS CLE DET NYY PHI STL WSH
Boston 6–16 6–16 7–15 5–17 8–14 11–11–1 3–18
Chicago 16–6 13–9 14–8–2 8–14 6–15 13–9 11–11
Cleveland 16–6 9–13 11–11 11–11 14–8 11–11 16–6
Detroit 15–7 8–14–2 11–11 10–12 11–11 12–10 12–10–1
New York 17–5 14–8 11–11 12–10 9–13 16–6 12–10–1
Philadelphia 14–8 15–6 8–14 11–11 13–9 15–7 7–12
St. Louis 11–11–1 9–13 11–11 10–12 6–16 7–15 8–14
Washington 18–3 11–11 6–16 10–12–1 10–12–1 12–7 14–8

Opening Day lineup

Ira Flagstead CF
Fred Haney 3B
Sy Rosenthal RF
Phil Todt 1B
Tom Jenkins LF
Mike Herrera 2B
Dud Lee SS
Alex Gaston C
Howard Ehmke   P

Roster

1926 Boston Red Sox
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
3B Fred Haney 138 462 102 .221 0 52
OF Ira Flagstead 98 415 124 .299 3 31
OF Sy Rosenthal 104 285 76 .267 4 34

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Howard Ehmke 14 97.1 3 10 5.46 38

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Bill Clowers 2 0 0 0 0.00 0

External links

Al Stokes

Albert John Stokes [born Albert John Stocek] (January 1, 1900 – December 19, 1986) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1925 through 1926 for the Boston Red Sox. Listed at 5' 9", 175 lb., Stokes batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Chicago, Illinois.

In a two-season career, Stokes was a .247 hitter (25-for-138) with 14 runs and seven RBI in 47 games, including three doubles, and four triples without home runs.

Stokes died at the age of 86 in Grantham, New Hampshire while visiting his daughter from his home in Wilton, Connecticut.

Bill Moore (catcher)

William Henry Moore [Willie] (December 12, 1901 – May 24, 1972) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1926 through 1927 for the Boston Red Sox. Listed at 5 11", 170 lb., Moore batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He was born in Kansas City, Missouri.

In a 20-game career, Moore was a .207 hitter (6-for-47) with nine runs, two doubles, and four RBI without home runs.

Moore died at the age of 70 in his homeland of Kansas City, Missouri.

Sy Rosenthal

Simon "Sy" Rosenthal (November 13, 1903 – April 7, 1969) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1925 through 1926 for the Boston Red Sox. Listed at 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m), 165 lb., Rosenthal batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was the first Jewish player on the Red Sox.

In a two-season career, Rosenthal was a .266 hitter (95-for-357) with four home runs and 42 RBI in 123 games, including 40 runs, 17 doubles, five triples, five stolen bases and a .319 on-base percentage. His big league career was hampered by a foot injury he suffered in the minor leagues; Rosenthal played professional baseball until 1935, but never again reached the major leagues.

Both Sy and his son Buddy (Irwin Rosenthal) joined to fight in World War II. The elder Rosenthal but was initially rejected due to loose cartilage in his knee dating back to baseball days. After being rejected, he paid for knee surgery to have the cartilage removed and had some expensive dental work done so he could pass the fitness tests, and he ultimately made the cut in spite of his age.

Both Rosenthals suffered great tragedy during the war. Buddy was killed in the Pacific Ocean on Christmas Day 1943, at just 17 years old. Sy reportedly served aboard ship during the D-Day invasion of Normandy, and was later assigned to the USS Miantonomah. Sy was rendered paraplegic on September 25, 1944, when his ship hit a German mine off the coast of France.

Rosenthal had liquidated his businesses in order to pay for his pre-war medical procedures, so the Red Sox held a "Sy Rosenthal Day" on September 13, 1947, to raise money for his care. He remained active in a number of charitable causes throughout his life. Rosenthal died at the age of 65 in his hometown of Boston.

American League
National League
Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Administration
World Series
Championships (9)
League
Pennants (14)
Division championships (10)
Wild card berths (7)
Minor league
affiliates
Broadcasting

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.