1926

1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1926th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 926th year of the 2nd millennium, the 26th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1920s decade.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1926 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1926
MCMXXVI
Ab urbe condita2679
Armenian calendar1375
ԹՎ ՌՅՀԵ
Assyrian calendar6676
Bahá'í calendar82–83
Balinese saka calendar1847–1848
Bengali calendar1333
Berber calendar2876
British Regnal year16 Geo. 5 – 17 Geo. 5
Buddhist calendar2470
Burmese calendar1288
Byzantine calendar7434–7435
Chinese calendar乙丑(Wood Ox)
4622 or 4562
    — to —
丙寅年 (Fire Tiger)
4623 or 4563
Coptic calendar1642–1643
Discordian calendar3092
Ethiopian calendar1918–1919
Hebrew calendar5686–5687
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1982–1983
 - Shaka Samvat1847–1848
 - Kali Yuga5026–5027
Holocene calendar11926
Igbo calendar926–927
Iranian calendar1304–1305
Islamic calendar1344–1345
Japanese calendarTaishō 15 / Shōwa 1
(昭和元年)
Javanese calendar1856–1857
Juche calendar15
Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days
Korean calendar4259
Minguo calendarROC 15
民國15年
Nanakshahi calendar458
Thai solar calendar2468–2469
Tibetan calendar阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
2052 or 1671 or 899
    — to —
阳火虎年
(male Fire-Tiger)
2053 or 1672 or 900

Events

January

February

March

Goddard and Rocket
March 16: Goddard with rocket in 1926.

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Date unknown

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Date unknown

Deaths

January–March

April–June

Emperor Sunjong
Emperor Sunjong
Sultan Mehmed VI of the Ottoman Empire
Sultan Mehmed VI

July–September

October–December

Nobel Prizes

Nobel medal

References

  1. ^ "Floods Drive 50,000 out of Homes on Rhine". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 2, 1926. p. 5.
  2. ^ "The BBC Radio Panic, 1926". Museum of Hoaxes. Archived from the original on January 6, 2015. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  3. ^ "Pangalos Named Greek President in Poll Farce". Chicago Daily Tribune. April 5, 1926. p. 16.
  4. ^ Dailey, Charles (April 18, 1926). "Chang's Son, at Head of Troops, Invades Peking". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13.
  5. ^ Thompson, Andrea (April 15, 2013). "Did Admiral Byrd Fly Over The North Pole Or Not?". LiveScience. Purch. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  6. ^ "May 9, 1926: Byrd flies over the North Pole?". This Day in History. A&E Television Networks. Archived from the original on January 6, 2015. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  7. ^ Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London, UK: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 346. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  8. ^ Russo, Gus (2001). The Outfit: The Role of Chicago's Underworld in the Shaping of Modern America. New York: Bloomsbury. p. 35. ISBN 978-1-59691-897-9.
  9. ^ Stewart, Mark (2010). The Detroit Red Wings. Chicago, IL: Norwood House Press. p. 6. ISBN 1599534010.
  10. ^ "Nicaragua (1909-present)". University of Central Arkansas. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  11. ^ "U.S. Troops Take 2 Nicaraguan Ports". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 24, 1926. p. 1.
1926 United Kingdom general strike

The 1926 general strike in the United Kingdom was a general strike that lasted nine days, from 3 May 1926 to 12 May 1926. It was called by the General Council of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in an unsuccessful attempt to force the British government to act to prevent wage reduction and worsening conditions for 1.2 million locked-out coal miners. Some 1.7 million workers went out, especially in transport and heavy industry. The government was prepared and enlisted middle class volunteers to maintain essential services. There was little violence and the TUC gave up in defeat. Though nine days in, the TUC leadership knew 'the government could hold out longer than the workers', it was perceived at the time as a 'brilliant failure'. According to a leading TUC researcher, Walter Milne-Bailey, 'There has never been a more amazing display of labour solidarity and the effect of such a demonstration must inevitably be deep and enduring. Workers have learnt a new sense of their oneness and their power.' In the 1929 general election, the Labour Party won more seats than any other party in Parliament for the first time in its history.

1926 United States House of Representatives elections

The 1926 United States House of Representatives elections was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1926 which occurred in the middle of President Calvin Coolidge's second term. Coolidge's Republican Party lost seats to the opposition Democratic Party, but it retained a majority. The most pressing national matters at the time were fragmented, generally related to government's relationship to business or to providing social aid. However, no predominant issue was able to cast a shadow over the election. The small, populist Farmer-Labor Party also held two seats following the election.

1926 United States Senate elections

The United States Senate elections of 1926 were elections for the United States Senate that occurred in the middle of Republican President Calvin Coolidge's second term. The Republican majority was reduced by six seats.

ACF Fiorentina

ACF Fiorentina S.p.A., commonly referred to as simply Fiorentina [fjorenˈtiːna], is a professional Italian football club from Florence, Tuscany. Founded by a merger in August 1926, and refounded in August 2002 following bankruptcy, Fiorentina have played at the top level of Italian football for the majority of their existence; only four clubs have played in more Serie A seasons.

Fiorentina has won two Italian Championships, in 1955–56 and again in 1968–69, as well as six Coppa Italia trophies and one Supercoppa Italiana. On the European stage, Fiorentina won the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup in 1960–61 and lost the final one year later. They finished runners-up in the 1956–57 European Cup, losing against Real Madrid, and also came close to winning the 1989–90 UEFA Cup, finishing as runners-up against Juventus after losing the first leg in Turin and drawing in the second one in Avellino.

Fiorentina is one of the fourteen European teams that played the finals in all three major continental competitions: the Champions League (1956–1957, the first Italian team to reach the final in the top continental competition), the UEFA Cup Winners (1960–1961 and 1961–1962) and the UEFA Cup (1989–1990).

Since 1931, the club have played at the Stadio Artemio Franchi, which currently has a capacity of 43,147. The stadium has used several names over the years and has undergone several renovations. Fiorentina are known widely by the nickname Viola, a reference to their distinctive purple colours.

Agaricus bisporus

Agaricus bisporus is an edible basidiomycete mushroom native to grasslands in Europe and North America. It has two color states while immature—white and brown—both of which have various names. When mature, it is known as portobello mushroom (also portabella or portobella).When immature and white, this mushroom may be known as common mushroom, button mushroom, cultivated mushroom, table mushroom, crimini mushroom and champignon mushroom. When immature and brown, it may be known variously as Swiss brown mushroom, Roman brown mushroom, Italian brown mushroom, cremini/crimini mushroom, or chestnut mushroom.

A. bisporus is cultivated in more than seventy countries, and is one of the most commonly and widely consumed mushrooms in the world.

Arai Helmet

Arai Helmet, Limited (株式会社 アライヘルメット, Kabushiki-gaisha Arai Herumetto) is a Japanese company that designs and manufactures motorcycle helmets and other helmets for motorsport. It was formed in 1926 by Hirotake Arai as a hatmaker. Currently, Michio "Mitch" Arai runs the company and his grand son, Akihito, is also involved.

Bessie Coleman

Bessie Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926) was an American civil aviator. She was the first woman of African-American descent and the first of Native American descent, to hold a pilot license.

She achieved her international pilot license in 1921. Born to a family of sharecroppers in Texas, she went into the cotton fields at a young age but also studied in a small segregated school and went on to attend one term of college at Langston University. She developed an early interest in flying, but African Americans, Native Americans, and women had no flight-school opportunities in the United States, so she saved up money to go to France to become a licensed pilot. She soon became a successful air show pilot in the United States, and hoped to start a school for African-American fliers. She died in a plane crash in 1926 while testing her new aircraft. Her pioneering role was an inspiration to early pilots and to the African-American and Native American communities.

Black History Month

Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month in the U.S., is an annual observance in Canada, Ireland, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. It began as a way for remembering important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. It is celebrated annually in the United States and Canada in February, as well as in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Republic of Ireland in October.

Harry Houdini

Harry Houdini (; born Erik Weisz, later Ehrich Weiss or Harry Weiss; March 24, 1874 – October 31, 1926) was a Hungarian-born American illusionist and stunt performer, noted for his sensational escape acts. He first attracted notice in vaudeville in the US and then as "Harry Handcuff Houdini" on a tour of Europe, where he challenged police forces to keep him locked up. Soon he extended his repertoire to include chains, ropes slung from skyscrapers, straitjackets under water, and having to escape from and hold his breath inside a sealed milk can with water in it.

In 1904, thousands watched as he tried to escape from special handcuffs commissioned by London's Daily Mirror, keeping them in suspense for an hour. Another stunt saw him buried alive and only just able to claw himself to the surface, emerging in a state of near-breakdown. While many suspected that these escapes were faked, Houdini presented himself as the scourge of fake spiritualists. As President of the Society of American Magicians, he was keen to uphold professional standards and expose fraudulent artists. He was also quick to sue anyone who imitated his escape stunts.

Houdini made several movies, but quit acting when it failed to bring in money. He was also a keen aviator, and aimed to become the first man to fly a plane in Australia.

Hugh Hefner

Hugh Marston Hefner (April 9, 1926 – September 27, 2017) was an American magazine publisher and life-stylist. He was the founder and editor-in-chief of Playboy magazine, a publication with revealing glamour photographs and sensational articles that provoked charges of obscenity. The first issue of Playboy, published in 1953, featured Marilyn Monroe in a nude calendar shoot and sold over 50,000 copies.

Hefner extended the Playboy brand into a world network of Playboy Clubs. He also resided in luxury mansions where Playboy ‘playmates’ shared his wild partying life, fueling keen media interest. An advocate of sexual liberation and freedom of expression, Hefner was a political activist in other causes; those causes included the Democratic Party, First Amendment rights, animal rescue, and the restoration of the Hollywood Sign.

John Dingell

John David Dingell Jr. (July 8, 1926 – February 7, 2019) was an American politician who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1955 until 2015. A member of the Democratic Party, he holds the record for longest-ever serving Congressperson in American history, representing Michigan for more than 59 years. He most recently served as the representative for Michigan's 12th congressional district. A longtime member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Dingell was a powerful chairman of the committee from 1981 to 1995 and 2007 to 2009.Dingell began his congressional career by succeeding his father, John Dingell Sr., as representative for Michigan's 16th congressional district on December 13, 1955; his father had held the seat for 22 years. He left office on January 3, 2015. Having served for over 59 years, he has the longest congressional tenure in U.S. history. He was also the longest-serving Dean of the U.S. House of Representatives and Dean of the Michigan congressional delegation. Dingell was one of the final two World War II veterans to have served in Congress; the other is Texas Representative Ralph Hall, who also left Congress in 2015. During his time in Congress in addition to protecting the automobile industry important to his district, Dingell was instrumental in passage of the Medicare Act, the Water Quality Act of 1965, Clean Water Act of 1972, the Endangered Species Act of 1973, the Clean Air Act of 1990, and the Affordable Care Act, among others. He was most proud of his work on the Civil Rights Act of 1964.Dingell announced on February 24, 2014, that he would not seek reelection to a 31st term in Congress. His wife, Debbie Dingell, ran to succeed her husband and defeated Republican Terry Bowman in the general election on November 4, 2014. He was the last member of Congress who had served in the 1950s and during the presidencies of Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy. President Barack Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2014.

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962) was an American actress, model, and singer. Famous for playing comic "blonde bombshell" characters, she became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s and was emblematic of the era's attitudes towards sexuality. Although she was a top-billed actress for only a decade, her films grossed $200 million by the time of her unexpected death in 1962 (equivalent to $2 billion in 2018). More than half a century later, she continues to be a major popular culture icon.Born and raised in Los Angeles, Monroe spent most of her childhood in foster homes and an orphanage and married at the age of 16. While working in a radioplane factory in 1944 as part of the war effort, she was introduced to a photographer from the First Motion Picture Unit and began a successful pin-up modeling career. The work led to short-lived film contracts with Twentieth Century-Fox (1946–1947) and Columbia Pictures (1948). After a series of minor film roles, she signed a new contract with Fox in 1951. Over the next two years, she became a popular actress and had roles in several comedies, including As Young as You Feel and Monkey Business, and in the dramas Clash by Night and Don't Bother to Knock. Monroe faced a scandal when it was revealed that she had posed for nude photos before she became a star, but the story did not tarnish her career and instead resulted in increased interest in her films.

By 1953, Monroe was one of the most marketable Hollywood stars; she had leading roles in the noir film Niagara, which focused on her sex appeal, and the comedies Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and How to Marry a Millionaire, which established her star image as a "dumb blonde". The same year, her images were used as the centerfold and in the cover of the first issue of the men's magazine Playboy. Although she played a significant role in the creation and management of her public image throughout her career, she was disappointed when she was typecast and underpaid by the studio. She was briefly suspended in early 1954 for refusing a film project but returned to star in one of the biggest box office successes of her career, The Seven Year Itch (1955).

When the studio was still reluctant to change Monroe's contract, she founded a film production company in late 1954; she named it Marilyn Monroe Productions (MMP). She dedicated 1955 to building her company and began studying method acting at the Actors Studio. In late 1955, Fox awarded her a new contract, which gave her more control and a larger salary. Her subsequent roles included a critically acclaimed performance in Bus Stop (1956) and the first independent production of MMP, The Prince and the Showgirl (1957). Monroe won a Golden Globe for Best Actress for her work in Some Like It Hot (1959), a critical and commercial success. Her last completed film was the drama The Misfits (1961).

Monroe's troubled private life received much attention. She struggled with substance abuse, depression, and anxiety. Her second and third marriages, to retired baseball star Joe DiMaggio and playwright Arthur Miller, respectively, were highly publicised and both ended in divorce. On August 5, 1962, she died at age 36 from an overdose of barbiturates at her home in Los Angeles. Although Monroe's death was ruled a probable suicide, several conspiracy theories have been proposed in the decades following her death.

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz (German: [mɛʁˈtseːdəsˌbɛnts] or [-dɛs-]) is a German global automobile marque and a division of Daimler AG. The brand is known for luxury vehicles, buses, coaches, and trucks. The headquarters is in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg. The name first appeared in 1926 under Daimler-Benz. In 2018, Mercedes-Benz was the biggest selling premium vehicle brand in the world, having sold 2.31 million passenger cars.Mercedes-Benz traces its origins to Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft's 1901 Mercedes and Karl Benz's 1886 Benz Patent-Motorwagen, which is widely regarded as the first gasoline-powered automobile. The slogan for the brand is "the best or nothing".

National Enquirer

The National Enquirer is an American supermarket tabloid published by American Media, Inc., (AMI). Founded in 1926, the tabloid has undergone a number of changes over the years.

The National Enquirer openly acknowledges that it will pay sources for tips, a practice generally disapproved of by the mainstream press. It has also been embroiled in several controversies related to its catch and kill practices and allegations of blackmail.

The tabloid has struggled with declining circulation figures because of competition from glossy tabloid publications.

In May 2014, American Media announced a decision to shift the headquarters of the National Enquirer from Florida, where it had been located since 1971, back to New York City, where it originally began as The New York Enquirer in 1926.

New International Encyclopedia

The New International Encyclopedia was an American encyclopedia first published in 1902 by Dodd, Mead and Company. It descended from the International Cyclopaedia (1884) and was updated in 1906, 1914 and 1926.

S.S.C. Napoli

Società Sportiva Calcio Napoli, commonly referred to as Napoli (pronounced [ˈnaːpoli], Naples Football Sport Club), is an Italian professional football club based in Naples, Campania. Formed in 1926, the club plays in Serie A, the top flight of Italian football. The club has won Serie A two times, and been runners-up six times, the Coppa Italia five times, the Supercoppa Italiana twice, and the 1988–89 UEFA Cup.Napoli have the fourth biggest fanbase in Italy, and in 2015 were ranked as the fifth most valuable football club in Serie A, as well as being listed on the Forbes' list of the most valuable football clubs. The club is one of the associate members of the European Club Association. In the January 2016 UEFA ratings, Napoli are ranked the eighth best club in European Football and the second best club in Italy.Since 1959, the club has played their home games at Stadio San Paolo in the Fuorigrotta suburb of Naples. Their home colours are sky blue shirts and white shorts. The official anthem of the club is "'O surdato 'nnammurato". Another anthem the Partenopei have coined is "Un giorno all'improvviso".

Schlumberger

Schlumberger Limited (French: [ʃlœ̃.bɛʁˈʒe]) is the world's largest oilfield services company. Schlumberger employs approximately 100,000 people

representing more than 140 nationalities working in more than 85 countries. Schlumberger has four principal executive offices located in Paris, Houston, London, and the Hague.Schlumberger is incorporated in Willemstad, Curaçao as Schlumberger N.V. and trades on the New York Stock Exchange, Euronext Paris, the London Stock Exchange, and SIX Swiss Exchange. Schlumberger is a Fortune Global 500 company, ranked 287 in 2016, and also listed in Forbes Global 2000, ranked 176 in 2016.

The Canberra Times

The Canberra Times is a daily newspaper in Canberra, Australia, which is published by Fairfax Media part of Nine Entertainment Co..

Turkish Statistical Institute

Turkish Statistical Institute (commonly known as TurkStat; Turkish: Türkiye İstatistik Kurumu or TÜİK) is the Turkish government agency commissioned with producing official statistics on Turkey, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. It was founded in 1926 and has its headquarters in Ankara.

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