1920 United States Census

The Fourteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from January 5, 1920, determined the resident population of the United States to be 106,021,537, an increase of 15.0 percent over the 92,228,496 persons enumerated during the 1910 Census.

Despite the constitutional requirement that House seats be reapportioned to the states respective of their population every ten years according to the census, members of Congress failed to agree on a reapportionment plan following this census, and the distribution of seats from the 1910 census remained in effect until 1933. In 1929, Congress passed the Reapportionment Act of 1929 which provided for a permanent method of reapportionment and fixed the number of Representatives at 435.

This was the first census in which a state – New York – recorded a population of more than ten million.

Fourteenth Census
of the United States
Seal of the United States Census Bureau
U.S. Census Bureau Seal
General information
CountryUnited States
Date takenJanuary 5, 1920
Total population106,021,537
Percent changeIncrease 15.0%
Most populous stateNew York
10,385,227
Least populous stateNevada
77,407

Census questions

The 1920 census collected the following information:[1]

  • address
  • name
  • relationship to head of family
  • sex
  • race
  • age
  • marital status
  • if foreign born, year of immigration to the U.S., whether naturalized and, if so, year of naturalization
  • school attendance
  • literacy
  • birthplace of person and parents
  • if foreign-born, the mother tongue
  • ability to speak English
  • occupation, industry, and class of worker migratory
  • whether home owned or rented, and, if owned, whether free or mortgaged

Full documentation for the 1920 census, including census forms and enumerator instructions, is available from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series.

State rankings

Rank State Population
1 New York 10,385,227
2 Pennsylvania 8,720,017
3 Illinois 6,485,280
4 Ohio 5,759,394
5 Texas 4,663,228
6 Massachusetts 3,852,356
7 Michigan 3,668,412
8 California 3,426,861
9 Missouri 3,404,055
10 New Jersey 3,155,900
11 Indiana 2,930,390
12 Georgia 2,895,832
13 Wisconsin 2,632,067
14 North Carolina 2,559,123
15 Kentucky 2,416,630
16 Iowa 2,404,021
17 Minnesota 2,387,125
18 Alabama 2,348,174
19 Tennessee 2,337,885
20 Virginia 2,309,187
21 Oklahoma 2,028,283
22 Louisiana 1,798,509
23 Mississippi 1,790,618
24 Kansas 1,769,257
25 Arkansas 1,752,204
26 South Carolina 1,683,724
27 West Virginia 1,463,701
28 Maryland 1,449,661
29 Connecticut 1,380,631
30 Washington 1,356,621
31 Nebraska 1,296,372
32 Florida 968,470
33 Colorado 939,629
34 Oregon 783,389
35 Maine 768,014
36 North Dakota 646,872
37 South Dakota 636,547
38 Rhode Island 604,397
39 Montana 548,889
40 Utah 449,396
41 New Hampshire 443,083
x District of Columbia 437,571
42 Idaho 431,866
43 New Mexico 360,350
44 Vermont 352,428
45 Arizona 334,162
46 Delaware 223,003
47 Wyoming 194,402
48 Nevada 77,407

Territories

United States Territories
Year of conquest or purchase Territory Population
1867 Alaska 55,036
1898 Hawaii 255,881
1898 Puerto Rico 1,299,809
1898 Guam 13,275
1898 Philippine Islands 10,314,310
1899 American Samoa N/A
1903 Panama Canal Zone N/A
1915 Haiti N/A
1916 Santo Domingo 894,652
1916 US Virgin Islands N/A

City rankings

Rank City State Population[2] Region (2016)[3]
01 New York New York 5,620,048 Northeast
02 Chicago Illinois 2,701,705 Midwest
03 Philadelphia Pennsylvania 1,823,779 Northeast
04 Detroit Michigan 993,078 Midwest
05 Cleveland Ohio 796,841 Midwest
06 St. Louis Missouri 772,897 Midwest
07 Boston Massachusetts 748,060 Northeast
08 Baltimore Maryland 733,826 South
09 Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 588,343 Northeast
10 Los Angeles California 576,673 West
11 Buffalo New York 506,775 Northeast
12 San Francisco California 506,676 West
13 Milwaukee Wisconsin 457,147 Midwest
14 Washington District of Columbia 437,571 South
15 Newark New Jersey 414,524 Northeast
16 Cincinnati Ohio 401,247 Midwest
17 New Orleans Louisiana 387,219 South
18 Minneapolis Minnesota 380,582 Midwest
19 Kansas City Missouri 324,410 Midwest
20 Seattle Washington 315,312 West
21 Indianapolis Indiana 314,194 Midwest
22 Jersey City New Jersey 298,103 Northeast
23 Rochester New York 295,750 Northeast
24 Portland Oregon 258,288 West
25 Denver Colorado 256,491 West
26 Toledo Ohio 243,164 Midwest
27 Providence Rhode Island 237,595 Northeast
28 Columbus Ohio 237,031 Midwest
29 Louisville Kentucky 234,891 South
30 Saint Paul Minnesota 234,698 Midwest
31 Oakland California 216,261 West
32 Akron Ohio 208,435 Midwest
33 Atlanta Georgia 200,616 South
34 Omaha Nebraska 191,601 Midwest
35 Worcester Massachusetts 179,754 Northeast
36 Birmingham Alabama 178,806 South
37 Syracuse New York 171,717 Northeast
38 Richmond Virginia 171,667 South
39 New Haven Connecticut 162,537 Northeast
40 Memphis Tennessee 162,351 South
41 San Antonio Texas 161,379 South
42 Dallas Texas 158,976 South
43 Dayton Ohio 152,559 Midwest
44 Bridgeport Connecticut 143,555 Northeast
45 Houston Texas 138,276 South
46 Hartford Connecticut 138,036 Northeast
47 Scranton Pennsylvania 137,783 Northeast
48 Grand Rapids Michigan 137,634 Midwest
49 Paterson New Jersey 135,875 Northeast
50 Youngstown Ohio 132,358 Midwest
51 Springfield Massachusetts 129,614 Northeast
52 Des Moines Iowa 126,468 Midwest
53 New Bedford Massachusetts 121,217 Northeast
54 Fall River Massachusetts 120,485 Northeast
55 Trenton New Jersey 119,289 Northeast
56 Nashville Tennessee 118,342 South
57 Salt Lake City Utah 118,110 West
58 Camden New Jersey 116,309 Northeast
59 Norfolk Virginia 115,777 South
60 Albany New York 113,344 Northeast
61 Lowell Massachusetts 112,759 Northeast
62 Wilmington Delaware 110,168 South
63 Cambridge Massachusetts 109,694 Northeast
64 Reading Pennsylvania 107,784 Northeast
65 Fort Worth Texas 106,482 South
66 Spokane Washington 104,437 West
67 Kansas City Kansas 101,177 Midwest
68 Yonkers New York 100,176 Northeast
69 Lynn Massachusetts 99,148 Northeast
70 Duluth Minnesota 98,917 Midwest
71 Tacoma Washington 96,965 West
72 Elizabeth New Jersey 95,783 Northeast
73 Lawrence Massachusetts 94,270 Northeast
74 Utica New York 94,156 Northeast
75 Erie Pennsylvania 93,372 Northeast
76 Somerville Massachusetts 93,091 Northeast
77 Waterbury Connecticut 91,715 Northeast
78 Flint Michigan 91,599 Midwest
79 Jacksonville Florida 91,558 South
80 Oklahoma City Oklahoma 91,295 South
81 Schenectady New York 88,723 Northeast
82 Canton Ohio 87,091 Midwest
83 Fort Wayne Indiana 86,549 Midwest
84 Evansville Indiana 85,264 Midwest
85 Savannah Georgia 83,252 South
86 Manchester New Hampshire 78,384 Northeast
87 St. Joseph Missouri 77,939 Midwest
88 Knoxville Tennessee 77,818 South
89 El Paso Texas 77,560 South
90 Bayonne New Jersey 76,754 Northeast
91 Peoria Illinois 76,121 Midwest
92 Harrisburg Pennsylvania 75,917 Northeast
93 San Diego California 74,683 West
94 Wilkes-Barre Pennsylvania 73,833 Northeast
95 Allentown Pennsylvania 73,502 Northeast
96 Wichita Kansas 72,217 Midwest
97 Tulsa Oklahoma 72,075 South
98 Troy New York 71,996 Northeast
99 Sioux City Iowa 71,227 Midwest
100 South Bend Indiana 70,983 Midwest

Data availability

The original census enumeration sheets were microfilmed by the Census Bureau in the 1940s; after which the original sheets were destroyed.[4] (dead link). The microfilmed census is available in rolls from the National Archives and Records Administration. Several organizations also host images of the microfilmed census online, and digital indices.

Microdata from the 1920 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System.

Notes

  1. ^ "Library Bibliography Bulletin 88, New York State Census Records, 1790-1925". New York State Library. October 1981. pp. 45 (p. 51 of PDF). Archived from the original on January 30, 2009. Retrieved December 15, 2008.
  2. ^ Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, U.S. Census Bureau, 1998
  3. ^ "Regions and Divisions". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 3, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.
  4. ^ Algonquin Area Public Library District. "Census Secrets" (PDF). Retrieved May 17, 2012.

External links

1922 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1922 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 7, 1922 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1920 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1922 United States elections

The 1922 United States elections were held on November 7, 1922. The election took place during Republican President Warren G. Harding's term. The Republican Party lost seats in both chambers of Congress, but retained their majority in the House and Senate. In the House, the Republicans lost seventy-seven seats to the Democratic Party. The Republicans also lost seven seats in the U.S. Senate, six to the Democrats and one to the Minnesota Farmer–Labor Party.The election is notable in that no redistricting occurred despite the completion of the 1920 United States Census, as Congress failed to pass a redistricting bill. This is the only congressional election in which there was no redistricting after a census. The Apportionment Act of 1911 remained in effect until the Reapportionment Act of 1929.

The election was a victory for Harding's progressive opponents in the Republican Party, and helped lead to the Teapot Dome investigations and Robert La Follette's 1924 third party candidacy.

1924 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1924 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 4, 1924 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1920 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1926 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1926 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 2, 1926 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1920 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1928 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1928 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 6, 1928 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1920 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1930 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1930 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 4, 1930 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1920 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

Bill Darrah

William Lindsey "Bill" Darrah (April 7, 1876 - after 1920) was a sheep rancher and stonemason in Shoshone, Idaho known for his construction of lava rock water tanks from the 1910s to 1920s. He built water tanks ranging from approximately eight to 30 feet high and from 12 to 25 feet in diameter. His tanks were typically built with a stone foundation several feet into the ground. The walls were approximately three feet wide and built out of lava stones and lime mortar. Darrah's tanks were typically accompanied by one-story pump housesA number of Darrah's works are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, some as part of a Multiple Resource Area Thematic Group submission for Lava Rock Structures in South Central Idaho.Darrah was born in April 1876 in California. He was the son of Simon Darrah and Arzilla (Shipton) Darrah. At the time of the 1880 United States Census, he was living in Shasta, California with his parents and six siblings. His father was employed as a lumberman at the time. By 1900, Darrah had relocated to Shoshone, Idaho where he was living with his parents and four siblings. As of 1918, Darrah was living in Shoshone with his wife, Ida A. Darrah and listed his occupation as a self-employed contractor. At the time of the 1920 United States Census, he remained in Shoshone living with his wife Ida and his sister-in-law Effie Parry. His occupation was listed as a mason, and his wife as a stenographer in an abstract office.Darrah's works include:

Darrah House and Water Tank House, located northeast of Shoshone, Idaho, NRHP-listed

Ben Darrah Water Tank and Well House, located north of Shoshone, Idaho, NRHP-listed

Thomas Gooding Water Tank House, located northwest of Shoshone, Idaho, NRHP-listed

Louis Johnson Water Tank House, located west of Richfield, Idaho, NRHP-listed

Myers School, located west of Shoshone, Idaho, NRHP-listed

J. W. and Rachel Newman House and Bunkhouse, located east of Jerome, Idaho, NRHP-listed

Arthur D. Silva Water Tank, located northwest of Shoshone, Idaho, NRHP-listed

Canterbury, New Hampshire

Canterbury is a town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 2,352 at the 2010 census. The Canterbury Shaker Village is in the eastern part of the town.

Fred Cozens

Frederick Warren Cozens (November 17, 1890 – January 2, 1954) was an American college basketball, football, and boxing coach. He was the first head coach of both basketball and football at UCLA and served as the school's athletic director from 1919 to 1942.

Cozens was born in Portland, Oregon in 1890. His father, Frederick Cozens (born 1849), was emigrated from England in 1870 and became a salesman at a hardware store in Portland. His mother Carrie E. (Beharrell) Cozens was born in Indiana in 1858. Cozens had an older sister, Ella M. Cozens, born in 1884. He received bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of California in 1915 and 1918, respectively, and a Ph.D. at the University of Oregon in 1928.Cozens was employed by the University of California for nearly 40 years. He began as a teaching fellow and physical education instructor at Berkeley from 1915 to 1919. In June 1917, he was employed as an instructor of physical education at the University of California at Berkeley, California.In 1919, Cozens moved to the Southern Branch of the University of California, now known as UCLA, where he served as the Director of Physical Education and Athletics and professor of physical education from 1919 to 1942. He became the first head coach of the Southern Branch men's basketball and football teams in 1919. Cozens remained the Southern Branch's basketball coach through 1921 and guided them to a 20–4 record. His Southern Branch football teams compiled a 2–6 record. The Southern Branch did not participate in an athletic conference until 1920, so the 1919 football team played a schedule full of local high schools and other assorted teams. Cozens also served as the dean of UCLA's college of Applied Arts from 1939 to 1942.At the time of the 1920 United States Census, Cozens was living in Los Angeles with his wife Helen J. Cozens and one-and-a-half year old son, Federick K. Cozens. Cozens' occupation was recorded as a professor at a university. At the time of the 1930 United States Census, Cozens was still living in Los Angeles with his wife, Helen. The couple had two sons, Frederick K. and James B. Cozens. Cozens' occupation was again listed as a professor at a university.Cozens returned to Berkeley in 1942 and served as a professor and director of physical education from 1942 to 1954. Cozens died in 1954 in Berkeley.

H. G. Salsinger

Harry George "H.G." Salsinger (April 10, 1885 – November 1958) was sports editor of The Detroit News for 49 years.

Salsinger was born in Ohio. In 1907, he started writing for The Cincinnati Post.In 1909, Salsinger began working at The Detroit News as sports editor, a position he held until his death in 1958. He covered 50 World Series, two Olympic Games, and many other sports including football, golf, tennis, and boxing. Salsinger was also a president of both the Baseball Writers' Association of America, and the Football Writers Association of America. Salsinger retired in January 1958 and died 10 months later at Henry Ford Hospital following a long illness.Salsinger was married to Gladys E. Salsinger. They had a son, Harry G. Salsinger, Jr., born in approximately 1920. At the time of the 1920 United States Census, Salsinger lived with his wife and son at 244 Pingree Avenue in Detroit.In 1968, the Baseball Writers' Association of American posthumously awarded Salsinger the J. G. Taylor Spink Award for his baseball writing. He was inducted into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 2002.

J. W. Knibbs

John William "Billy" Knibbs, Jr. (November 8, 1880 – July 5, 1953) was an American football player and coach.

Knibbs was born in Massachusetts on November 8, 1880. He attended Dartmouth College from which he graduated in 1905. He played on the Dartmouth Big Green football team from 1901 to 1904, and was the team captain in his senior year.

After graduating from Dartmouth, he was hired to serve as the head football coach at the University of California, Berkeley for the 1905 college football season. He led the team to a record of 4–1–2 in his only year as the coach. An account written by a student described Knibbs' coaching style as follows:"All hopes and fears of our University are now bound up in the coming Stanford-California football game. We are lying very low and keeping very quiet, as the policy of our Eastern coach, Knibbs, of Dartmouth, is most conservative. Most of the practising is secret, and the field is closed to all save the squad except two afternoons of each week. The work his [sic] year has been tackled in a serious, dogged style by all those out; this alone has won much respect for our new coach."

After retiring from football, Knibbs had a lengthy career with the Otis Elevator Company. In 1909, he was employed by Otis at St. Louis, Missouri. At the time of the 1910 United States Census, he was living in Denver, Colorado, with his wife, Marion (age 29), and their daughter, Olive (age 1-8/12). He was employed as a manager for an elevator manufacturing company. In 1915, he was employed as an Otis salesman in San Francisco. In 1918, he was a western selling agent for Otis Elevator Company. In a draft registration card completed in September 1918, Knibbs indicated he was living in Winchester, Massachusetts, and working as an elevator salesman for the Otis Elevator Co. in Boston. At the time of the 1920 United States Census, he was living in Mount Vernon, New York with his wife, Marion, and their two children, Olive (age 11) and John (age 9). He was employed as a salesman for a contracting business. At the time of the 1930 United States Census, he was living in Mount Vernon, New York with his wife, Marion, and their two children, Olive (age 21) and John. W., Jr. (age 17). He was employed as an elevator salesman. He died at a hospital in Mount Vernon on July 5, 1953. His wife, Marion, had predeceased him in 1951. They were buried at Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York.

Knibbs' son, John W. Knibbs III, also played football at Dartmouth.

Jack Oughton

John "Jack" Oughton (September 18, 1876 – after 1940) was a skilled stonemason in Lincoln County, Idaho. A number of his works are listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.Oughton was born in Ireland and immigrated to the United States in 1886. At the time of the 1910 United States Census, he was living in Twin Falls, Idaho with Mary Oughton, age 16, and was employed as a mason. At the time of the 1920 United States Census he was living in Shoshone, Idaho with fellow stonemason and partner Alexander Reed. At the time of the 1940 Census, he was still living in Shoshone and employed as a mason. Sandy Reed was a partner, including in building the Jack Oughton House.

Works include:

American Legion Hall, built in 1928, at 107 W. A St., Shoshone, Idaho (Oughton,Jack), NRHP-listed

W. S. Kohl Barn, built in 1910, located northeast of Richfield Richfield, Idaho (Oughton,Jack), NRHP-listed

James H. Laine Barn, built in 1910, located south of Richfield, Idaho, (Oughton,Jack), NRHP-listed

W. H. Murphy House, built in 1928, at 607 S. Greenwood St., Shoshone, Idaho (Oughton,Jack), NRHP-listed

Jack Oughton House, built in 1931, at 123 N. Beverly St., Shoshone, Idaho (Oughton,Jack), NRHP-listed

Lee Hall, Virginia

Lee Hall is a former unincorporated town (or village) long located in the former Warwick County. Since 1958, Lee Hall has been a suburban community in the extreme western portion of the independent city of Newport News in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Milton Olander

Milton Martin Olander (January 25, 1899 – December 30, 1961) was an American football player and coach.

Olander was born in 1899 at Rockford, Illinois. His father, Frank Olander, emigrated from Sweden in 1881 and became a saloon keeper in Rockford. His mother, Selma Olander, emigrated from Sweden in 1888. He had two older brothers, Carl (born May 1895) and Clarence (born April 1897).Olander graduated from Rockford High School, where he played on the football, basketball and track teams and was captain of the football team for two years. He next enrolled at the University of Illinois where he played at the tackle position for Robert Zuppke's Fighting Illini football teams from 1918 to 1921. The University of Illinois yearbook noted: "'Milt' was the leading factor in the Illini line. His steadiness characterized him as Zup's most heady player. This was his fourth season."

At the time of the 1920 United States Census, Olander was working as a laborer in a warehouse and living in Rockford with his mother, his older brother Clarence, and his younger sister Alice.After graduating from Illinois, Olander served as the head football coach at the Western State Normal School (now known as Western Michigan University) in 1922 and 1923. In his first year as a head coach, he led Western State to a perfect 6–0 record as his team outscored its opponents 160 to 0.In April 1924, Olander signed a contract to return to the University of Illinois as the freshman football coach. He served as an assistant football coach at Illinois through the 1934 season.At the time of the 1930 United States Census, Olander was living in Champaign, Illinois with his wife Mary S. Olander, daughter Suzanne Olander, and son Milton M. Olander, Jr. His occupation at that time was listed as an assistant coach for a university.In 1940, Olander was appointed as the head of the Athletic Board of Control at the University of Illinois.Olander lived in Sylvania, Ohio in his later years. He worked as the director of industrial relations for Owens-Illinois Glass Co. at Toledo, Ohio. In 1953, he was offered a position as an Assistant Secretary of Labor in the administration of President Dwight Eisenhower.Olander died in December 1961 at Toledo at the age of 62.Olander was one of the original members of the parks commission in Sylvania, Ohio. In recognition of his efforts, the city's park system is known as The Olander Park System. The city's largest park, Olander Park, and its lake, Lake Olander, are also named after him.

Norman E. Brown

Norman Edgar Brown (October 10, 1890 – March 31, 1958) was an American sportswriter and sports editor for the Central Press Association.

Brown was born in Ohio in October 1890. At the time of the 1910 United States Census, Brown was living with his parents in Cleveland, Ohio, working as a newspaper reporter. By June 1917, he was the sporting editor of the Cleveland Press. At the time of the 1920 United States Census, Brown was married, and he and his wife (Emily Anna Winter Brown) were living in Lakewood, Ohio, where Brown was the managing editor of a newspaper.During the 1920s, Brown was the sports editor of the Central Press Association and wrote a regular sports column called "Fanning the Beehive" and "Sports Done Brown." He was also known for his annual college football All-American team selections. In 1926, he launched an effort to have the fans select the All-American team by taking a "country-wide poll of football followers."At the time of the 1930 United States Census, Brown was living in Lakewood, Ohio with his wife, and their daughter Emily Louise Brown; Brown remained employed at that time by the Central Press Association.In addition to his work as a newspaper reporter and editor, Brown was active in politics. He was the campaign publicist for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harold Hitz Burton when he ran for mayor of Cleveland in 1935. He served in the same capacity for John W. Bricker for Governor of Ohio in 1939.In 1934, Brown moved to St. Petersburg, Florida. After moving to Florida, he became affiliated with the Derby Lane Greyhound Track, which he named. From 1942 to 1948, he was the manager of radio station WSUN in St. Petersburg. In his later years, he was the publicity director for the St. Petersburg Kennel Club. He died at his home in St. Petersburg in March 1958.

Parksley Spuds

The Parksley Spuds were a Class D minor league baseball team based in Parksley, Virginia, which had a population of just over 600 people at the 1920 United States Census. They played in the Eastern Shore League between 1922 and 1928, the entire run of the league's initial incarnation. The Spuds won multiple league pennants during that span. The league encountered financial difficulties during the 1928 season and the owners of the teams voted to disband the league.

One of the notable players to appear for the Spuds was Jimmie Foxx; he was a catcher for the team during its visit to a 1924 championship series known as the Five-State Championship. He later became a Baseball Hall of Fame first baseman.

Sherry Jackson

Sherry D. Jackson (born February 15, 1942) is a retired American actress and former child star.

Tubby Meyers

Melvin J. "Tubby" Meyers (September 5, 1887 – May 2, 1940), sometimes spelled "Myers," was an American football player and coach. He was the first head coach and first captain of the Western Michigan Broncos football program, holding both titles as a player-coach during the 1906 college football season.

Meyers was born in Gobleville, Michigan in 1887, and moved with his family to Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1895. His father, Rollie Meyers was a Michigan native who worked as a mail clerk at the post office. His mother, Vivia Meyers, was an Ohio native. He had an older brother, Rauel, a younger brother, Carl, and a younger sister, Fern.Meyers enrolled at the Western State Normal School (now known as Western Michigan University) in Kalamazoo as a student in the Manual Training department. He was the coach, captain and halfback for the football team in the school's inaugural season of college football in 1906. He is recognized both as the first head football coach and "the first great player" in the history of the Western Michigan Broncos football program.After graduating from Western State in 1909, Myers was hired by Port Huron High School in Port Huron, Michigan. He served as supervisor of manual training and director of athletics at the school. He also served for many years as the school's football coach. In June 1917, Myers completed a draft registration card stating that he was employed at Port Huron High School as a manual training and athletics instructor.In 1920, he was married to Mary "Mayme" McCallum (1887–1978) at Port Huron. At the time of the 1920 United States Census, Meyers was living with his wife, Mary A. Meyers, in Port Huron. His occupation was listed as a teacher in a high school. As of 1925, he was serving in the National Guard with the rank of first lieutenant. At the time of the 1930 United States Census, Meyers and his wife continued to reside in Port Huron. They had a daughter, Minola A. Meyers. His occupation was listed in 1930 as a teacher of manual arts. McCallum died in 1942 at Port Huron.

In 1939, he became the business manager and purchasing agent for the Port Huron board of education. He died at age in May 1940 after collapsing at the Masonic Temple in Sarnia.Since 1947, the "Tubby Meyers Award" has been presented each year to the outstanding player on the Port Huron High School football team.

William Gettle

William F. Gettle (c. 1887 - December 22, 1941) was an American businessman and millionaire. He gained some notoriety when he was kidnapped in 1934.

Gettle was originally from Oklahoma, and moved to Bakersfield, California, in the 1920s, where he worked for J.C. Penny and invested in oil fields. The 1920 United States Census showed he was living in Kern, California. At the time of the kidnapping, Gettle weighed 500 pounds, and he and his handicapped wife Fleeta had four children, all of whom were under 10 years of age. One of their neighbors was comedian Joe E. Brown. According to the Los Angeles Times, he was worth around $3,500,000.

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