1920 All-Pro Team

The 1920 All-Pro Team represented the All-Pro team for the 1920 season of the American Professional Football Association (APFA), later renamed the National Football League (NFL). It was compiled by sportswriter Bruce Copeland.

Teams

First team
Player Position Team
Guy Chamberlin End Decatur Staleys
Oke Smith End Rock Island Independents
Wilbur Henry Tackle Canton Bulldogs
Hugh Blacklock Tackle Decatur Staleys
Fred Denfeld Guard Rock Island Independents
Dewey Lyle Guard Rock Island Independents
George Trafton Center Decatur Staleys
Paddy Driscoll Quarterback Chicago Cardinals
Eddie Novak Halfback Rock Island Independents
Fritz Pollard Halfback Akron Pros
Rip King Fullback Akron Pros
Second team
Player Position Team
George Halas End Decatur Staleys
Obe Wenig End Rock Island Independents
Cub Buck Tackle Canton Bulldogs
Ed Shaw Tackle Rock Island Independents
Alf Cobb Guard Akron Pros
Harrie Dadmun Guard Canton Bulldogs
Paul Des Jardien Center Chicago Tigers
Al Mahrt Quarterback Dayton Triangles
Norb Sacksteder Halfback Dayton Triangles
Joe Guyon Halfback Canton Bulldogs
Guil Falcon Fullback Chicago Tigers
Third team
Player Position Team
Bobby Marshall End Rock Island Independents
Bob Nash End Akron Pros
Burt Ingwersen Tackle Decatur Staleys
Walt Buland Tackle Rock Island Independents
Tommy Tomlin Guard Akron Pros
Ross Petty Guard Decatur Staleys
Freeman Fitzgerald Center Rock Island Independents
Milt Ghee Quarterback Chicago Tigers
Edward Sternaman Halfback Decatur Staleys
Frank Bacon Halfback Dayton Triangles
Pete Calac Fullback Canton Bulldogs

References

  • Hogrogian, John (1984). "1920 All-Pros" (PDF). The Coffin Corner. Professional Football Researchers Association. 6 (1). Archived from the original on 2014-08-08.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  • 1920 APFA All-Pros
1920 Cleveland Tigers (NFL) season

The 1920 Cleveland Tigers season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football Association (APFA) and fifth total as an American football team. The Tigers entered the season coming off a 5-win, 2-loss, 2-tie (5–2–2) record in 1919. After the 1919 season, several representatives from the Ohio League, a loose organization of profession football teams, wanted to form a new professional league; thus, the APFA was created.

The Tigers opened the season with a 0–0 tie against the Dayton Triangles, en route to a 2–4–2 record, which placed the team 10th in the final standings. In week 8, the Tigers scored 7 points against the Akron Pros, which was the only points Akron allowed all season. The sportswriter Bruce Copeland compiled the 1920 All-Pro list, but no players from the Tigerss were on it. As of 2012, no player from the 1920 Tigers roster has been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1920 Dayton Triangles season

The 1920 Dayton Triangles season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football Association (AFPA)—later named the National Football League. The Triangles entered the season coming off a 5–2–1 record in 1919 in the Ohio League. After the 1919 season, several representatives from the Ohio League wanted to form a new professional league; thus, the APFA was created. A majority of the team stayed from the 1919 team, including the coaching staff, while two players left the team.

The Triangles opened the season with a win against the Columbus Panhandles. This game is considered the first league game where two APFA teams played against each other. After a six-game winning streak, the Triangles faced their first loss of the season to the future champions, the Akron Pros. This team would give the Triangles their only two losses of the year. The Triangles finished the season with a 5–2–2 record, which earned them sixth place in the APFA standings. No players were awarded with the first team All-Pro award, Norb Sacksteder made the second team, and Frank Bacon made the third team.

1920 Decatur Staleys season

The 1920 Decatur Staleys season was the inaugural regular season of the franchise that would be known as the Chicago Bears, and they completed in the newly formed American Professional Football Association. The club posted a 10–1–2 record under first year head coach/player George Halas earning them a second-place finish in the team standings. The stars of the Staleys were Ed "Dutch" Sternaman, Jimmy Conzelman, and George Halas. Sternaman had a remarkable season with 11 rushing TDs, 1 receiving TDs, 4 field goals, and 3 PATs, totaling 87 points scored out of the Staleys' total of 164. Jimmy Conzelman ran for two scores and threw two more. Halas led the team in receiving scores with 2. In the last league game of the season, the Staleys needed a win versus Akron to have a chance at the title. Akron, predictably, played for a tie, achieved that, and won the first APFA title.

1920 Hammond Pros season

The 1920 Hammond Pros season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football Association (APFA) and second as an American football team. The Pros entered 1920 coming off a 4-win, 2-loss, 3-tie (4–2–3) record in 1919 as an independent team. Several representatives from another professional football league, the Ohio League, wanted to form a new national league, and thus the APFA was created.

The Pros opened the 1920 season with a 26–0 loss to the Rock Island Independents. The team did not score a point until their third game, and ended the season with a 2–5 record, which placed it tied for 11th place in the final standings. The sportswriter Bruce Copeland compiled the 1920 All-Pro list, but no players from the Pros were on it. As of 2012, no player from the 1920 Hammond Pros roster has been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1920 Muncie Flyers season

The 1920 Muncie Flyers season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football League (APFA)—later named the National Football League. The Flyers entered the season coming off a 4–1–1 record in 1919. Several representatives from the Ohio League wanted to form a new professional league; thus, the APFA was created. The 1920 team only played in one game that counted in the standings: a 45–0 loss against the Rock Island Independents. This game and the Columbus Panhandles–Dayton Triangles on the same date is considered to be the first league game featuring two APFA teams. The Flyers tried to schedule other games, but the opponents canceled to play better teams. As a result, the Flyers had to play the rest of the season's game versus local teams. In week 10, the Flyers won a game against the Muncie Offers More AC for the Muncie City Championship. No players from the 1920 Muncie Flyers were listed on the 1920 All-Pro Team, and no player has been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Al Mahrt

Alphonse Herman Mahrt (October 12, 1893 – June 24, 1970) was a professional football player and coach who played his entire career with the Dayton Triangles of the "Ohio League" and later the National Football League (NFL). He was an early proponent of the forward pass after the revolutionary play was added to an extensive list of regulations to college football in 1906. By 1911 when most of the pass restrictions were lifted, Mahrt debuted as regular back on St. Mary’s Institute’s (now the University of Dayton) varsity football team. Mahrt discovered that spinning the throw of the ball increased accuracy and distance, establishing an aerial offense against such teams as Xavier University and Otterbein College.

In 1913 Mahrt switched to the St. Mary’s Cadets, the precursor of the future Dayton Triangles, he was also named the team's captain. Mahrt returned to St. Mary’s varsity in 1914, and captained the team. That season a 70-yard spiral to Babe Zimmerman against Ohio Northern University set a school record. Aside from his college career, Al continued to play for the Cadets. From 1913 until 1915 the team won the Dayton City Championship every year. In 1914 Mahrt was injured through most of the season, however in 1915 he was named the team's coach. In 1918, Mahrt joined the United States Army and served in World War I.

In 1920, Al led all passers in the American Professional Football Association (renamed the NFL in 1922), completing 28 aerials for 591 yards. He would also throw 7 touchdowns on the year. He was runner-up in 1921 completing 29 that were good for 452 yards. He was chosen to the 1920 All-Pro team, which placed him as a second team quarterback. He retired from the Triangles after the 1922 season.

After his football career, Mahrt worked at Dayton Brewing Co, Dayton Metal Products, and Smart Co. He then worked with Mead Corporation (later MeadWestvaco, now WestRock) for nearly 30 years before retiring in 1959. When he retired he was the Vice President of the corporation. WestRock's Mahrt paper mill in Cottonton, Alabama, was named in Mr. Mahrt's honor.

Jimmy Conzelman

James Gleason Dunn Conzelman (March 6, 1898 – July 31, 1970) was an American football player and coach, baseball executive, and advertising executive. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1964 and was selected in 1969 as a quarterback on the National Football League 1920s All-Decade Team.

A native of St. Louis, Conzelman played college football for the 1918 Great Lakes Navy Bluejackets team that won the 1919 Rose Bowl. In 1919, he was an All-Missouri Valley Conference quarterback for the Washington University Pikers football team. He then played ten seasons as a quarterback, halfback, placekicker, and coach in the National Football League (NFL) for the Decatur Staleys (1920), Rock Island Independents (1921–1922), Milwaukee Badgers (1922–1924), Detroit Panthers (1925–1926), and Providence Steam Roller (1927–1929). He was also a team owner in Detroit and, as player-coach, led the 1928 Providence Steam Roller team to an NFL championship.

From 1932 to 1939, Conzelman was the head football coach for the Washington University Bears football team, leading the program to Missouri Valley Conference championships in 1934, 1935, and 1939. He served as head coach of the NFL's Chicago Cardinals from 1940 to 1942 and again from 1946 to 1948. He led the Cardinals to an NFL championship in 1947 and Western Division championships in 1947 and 1948. He was also an executive with St. Louis Browns in Major League Baseball from 1943 to 1945.

Paddy Driscoll

John Leo "Paddy" Driscoll (January 11, 1895 – June 29, 1968) was an American football and baseball player and football coach. A triple-threat man in football, he was regarded as the best drop kicker and one of the best overall players in the early years of the National Football League (NFL). He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1965 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1974.

Driscoll played college football as a quarterback and halfback for the Northwestern football team in 1915 and 1916. In 1917, he played Major League Baseball as an infielder for the Chicago Cubs. He joined the United States Navy during World War I and played for the undefeated 1918 Great Lakes Navy football team that won the 1919 Rose Bowl.

Driscoll played professional football as a quarterback and halfback for the Hammond All-Stars (1917), Hammond Pros (1919), Racine/Chicago Cardinals (1920–1925), and Chicago Bears (1926–1929). He was the NFL's first All-Pro quarterback and its leading scorer in 1923 and 1926. He also led the 1925 Chicago Cardinals to an NFL championship and was selected in 1969 for the NFL 1920s All-Decade Team.

Driscoll also worked for many years as a football coach. He was the head coach of Chicago Cardinals from 1920 to 1922 and at Marquette from 1937 to 1940. He spent the last 28 years of his life with the Chicago Bears as an assistant coach (1941–1955), head coach (1956–1957), and later as the director of the Bears' research and planning unit.

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