1913 World Series

In the 1913 World Series, the Philadelphia Athletics beat the New York Giants four games to one.

The A's pitching gave the edge to a closer-than-it-looked Series in 1913. Christy Mathewson lost his Series swan song in the final game to an old college rival and eventual fellow Baseball Hall of Fame member, Eddie Plank.

The Giants thus became the first National League team since the Chicago Cubs (19061908) to win three consecutive pennants. They were also the second club (following the Detroit Tigers 19071909) to lose three consecutive World Series; and remain the last to do so.

The Series itself was a face-off between two teams that later became crosstown rivals in Oakland and San Francisco. The Oakland A's won again in a four-game sweep in the 1989 World Series, famous for the earthquake that struck before Game 3, which is the last World Series victory for the A's.

1913 World Series
1913-world-series-polo-grounds
Team (Wins) Manager(s) Season
Philadelphia Athletics (4) Connie Mack 96–57, .627, GA: ​6 12
New York Giants (1) John McGraw 101–51, .664, GA: ​12 12
DatesOctober 7–11
UmpiresBill Klem (NL), Tommy Connolly (AL), Cy Rigler (NL), Rip Egan (AL)
Hall of FamersUmpires: Bill Klem, Tommy Connolly
Athletics: Connie Mack (manager), Frank Baker, Chief Bender, Eddie Collins, Herb Pennock (dnp), Eddie Plank
Giants: John McGraw (manager), Rube Marquard, Christy Mathewson
Broadcast
World Series

Summary

1913WorldSeries

AL Philadelphia Athletics (4) vs. NL New York Giants (1)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 7 Philadelphia Athletics – 6, New York Giants – 4 Polo Grounds 2:06 36,292[1] 
2 October 8 New York Giants – 3, Philadelphia Athletics – 0 (10 innings) Shibe Park 2:22 20,563[2] 
3 October 9 Philadelphia Athletics – 8, New York Giants – 2 Polo Grounds 2:11 36,896[3] 
4 October 10 New York Giants – 5, Philadelphia Athletics – 6 Shibe Park 2:09 20,568[4] 
5 October 11 Philadelphia Athletics – 3, New York Giants – 1 Polo Grounds 1:39 36,632[5]

Matchups

1913WSCelebs2
PA Governor and Mrs. John Kinley Tener
1913WSCelebs1
Baseball execs Ed McKeever (Brooklyn NL), Ben Shibe (Phila. AL), Garry Herrmann and Joseph Flanner (Cincinnati NL) (Front, L–R)

Game 1

Tuesday, October 7, 1913 2:00 pm (ET) at Polo Grounds in Manhattan, New York
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 0 6 11 1
New York 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 4 11 0
WP: Chief Bender (1–0)   LP: Rube Marquard (0–1)
Home runs:
PHA: Home Run Baker (1)
NYG: None

In the opener, Home Run Baker drove in three runs with three hits for the A's, including a home run. Eddie Collins went 3-3 and scored three runs. Despite giving up four runs and eleven hits, Chief Bender held on for a 6-4 win.

Game 2

Wednesday, October 8, 1913 2:00 pm (ET) at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 7 2
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 2
WP: Christy Mathewson (1–0)   LP: Eddie Plank (0–1)

Mathewson and Plank matched craft and guile. In the bottom of the ninth inning of a scoreless game, the Giants put on a stirring baseball version of the "goal-line stand". With none out, the A's had Amos Strunk on third and Jack Barry on second. The next batter, Jack Lapp, grounded to first, where Hooks Wiltse, a pitcher, was filling in. Wiltse made a good stop and threw home to nab Strunk. With Barry on third now and Lapp on first, Plank grounded to Wiltse and Hooks fired home again, getting a sliding Barry. Mathewson retired the next hitter, and the game went into extra innings. In the top of the tenth the Giants broke the ice with three runs, with Mathewson singling in the winning run and then completing the extra-inning shutout by retiring the A's in their half of the tenth.

Game 3

1913WorldSeriesBleachers
Crowds in Polo Grounds before Game 3 of the World Series
1913WSCrandallVsBenderG4
Game 4 at Shibe: Doc Crandall at the plate, Chief Bender on the hill
Thursday, October 9, 1913 2:00 pm (ET) at Polo Grounds in Manhattan, New York
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 3 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 8 12 1
New York 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 5 1
WP: Bullet Joe Bush (1–0)   LP: Jeff Tesreau (0–1)
Home runs:
PHA: Wally Schang (1)
NYG: None

Eddie Collins had three hits and three RBI, and Bullet Joe Bush threw a five-hitter to put the A's ahead in the series.

Game 4

Friday, October 10, 1913 2:00 pm (ET) at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 5 8 2
Philadelphia 0 1 0 3 2 0 0 0 X 6 9 0
WP: Chief Bender (2–0)   LP: Al Demaree (0–1)
Home runs:
NYG: Fred Merkle (1)
PHA: None

The home team won for the first time in the series, although the visiting Giants made it close in the late innings. Wally Schang had four RBI for the A's, they now had a 3-1 lead in the series. Just like in Game 1, Bender struggled but went the distance for his second win of the series.

Game 5

Saturday, October 11, 1913 2:00 pm (ET) at Polo Grounds in Manhattan, New York
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 6 1
New York 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 2
WP: Eddie Plank (1–1)   LP: Christy Mathewson (1–1)

Plank led the Athletics to victory, allowing the Giants only two hits, but his own error in the fifth inning cost him a shutout.

This was the A's third series title in four years. They had also won in 1910 and 1911.

Composite box

1913 Philadelphia Athletics World Series team
The Athletics World Series team

1913 World Series (4–1): Philadelphia Athletics (A.L.) over New York Giants (N.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R H E
Philadelphia Athletics 4 3 2 6 4 0 2 2 0 0 23 46 5
New York Giants 0 0 1 0 5 0 4 2 0 3 15 33 7
Total attendance: 150,950   Average attendance: 30,190
Winning player's share: $3,246   Losing player's share: $2,164[6]

Notes

  1. ^ "1913 World Series Game 1 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. New York Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. ^ "1913 World Series Game 2 – New York Giants vs. Philadelphia Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "1913 World Series Game 3 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. New York Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1913 World Series Game 4 – New York Giants vs. Philadelphia Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "1913 World Series Game 5 – Philadelphia Athletics vs. New York Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. ^ "World Series Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved June 14, 2009.

References

  • Cohen, Richard M.; Neft, David S. (1990). The World Series: Complete Play-By-Play of Every Game, 1903–1989. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 48–51. ISBN 0-312-03960-3.
  • Reichler, Joseph (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.). Macmillan Publishing. p. 2121. ISBN 0-02-579010-2.

External links

1913 Major League Baseball season

The 1913 Major League Baseball season.

1913 New York Giants season

The 1913 New York Giants season was the franchise's 31st season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant for the third consecutive year. Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants dominated the NL and finished 12½ games in front of the second place Philadelphia Phillies. They were beaten by the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1913 World Series.

Ace pitcher Christy Mathewson went 25–11 and led the NL with a 2.06 ERA. Rube Marquard and Jeff Tesreau also won over 20 games, and the Giants easily allowed the fewest runs of any team in the league.

Taken together with the 1911 and 1912 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time. The roster was basically unchanged from 1912.

1913 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1913 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League with a record of 96 wins and 57 losses. The team then defeated the New York Giants in the 1913 World Series, 4 games to 1.

In 2001, baseball historian Bill James ranked the 1913 incarnation of the Athletics' famous "$100,000 infield" as the best of all time in major league history (first baseman Stuffy McInnis, second baseman Eddie Collins, third baseman Frank "Home Run" Baker, shortstop Jack Barry).

1913 in sports

1913 in sports describes the year's events in world sport.

1914 World Series

In the 1914 World Series, the Boston Braves beat the Philadelphia Athletics in a four-game series.

The "Miracle Braves" were in last place on July 4, then won the National League pennant by ​10 1⁄2 games. The Braves' relatively unknown starting trio of pitchers, with a combined career record of 285–245, outperformed the Athletics vaunted rotation (929–654) in all four games. Hank Gowdy hit .545 (6 of 11) with five extra-base hits and also drew five walks for Boston in the series and was the difference maker in Games 1 and 3.

Adding to their supposed disadvantages, the Braves arguably lacked a notable home-field advantage. They had abandoned their 43-year-old home field South End Grounds in August 1914, choosing to rent from the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park while awaiting construction of Braves Field (1915). Thus their home games in this Series were also at Fenway.

This was the first four-game sweep in World Series history. The Cubs had defeated the Tigers four games to none in 1907, but Game 1 had ended in a tie before the Cubs won the next four in a row.

At least one publication, To Every Thing A Season by Bruce Kuklick, has suggested other factors that might have contributed to the sweep, noting that some of the A's may have been irritated at the penny-pinching ways of their manager/owner Connie Mack and thus did not play hard, and also noting the heavy wagering against Philadelphia placed by entertainer George M. Cohan through bookmaker Sport Sullivan, who was also implicated in the 1919 Black Sox scandal. Chief Bender and Eddie Plank jumped to the rival Federal League for the 1915 season. Mack unloaded most of his other high-priced stars soon after and, within two years, the A's achieved the worst winning percentage in modern history (even worse than the 1962 New York Mets or the 2003 Detroit Tigers).

Bay Bridge Series

The Bay Bridge Series, or the Battle of the Bay, is a series of baseball games played between—and the rivalry of—Major League Baseball's Oakland Athletics of the American League and San Francisco Giants of the National League. The series takes its name from the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge which links the cities of Oakland and San Francisco. As of 2018, the winner of the annual series retains a trophy fashioned from a piece of the original bridge.Although competitive, the regional rivalry between the A's and Giants is considered a friendly one with mostly mutual companionship between the fans, as opposed to Cubs–White Sox, or Mets–Yankees games where animosity runs high, though sections of each fanbase does harbor towards the entirety of the other. This, however, is limited as many people see the opposing team as no threat to their own; hats displaying both teams on the cap are sold from vendors at the games, and once in a while the teams both dress in uniforms from a historic era of their franchises.

The series is also occasionally referred to as the "BART Series" for the Bay Area Rapid Transit system that links Oakland to San Francisco. However, the name "BART Series" has never been popular beyond a small selection of history books and national broadcasters and has fallen out of favor, likely because BART does not provide direct or easy access to Oracle Park in San Francisco. Bay Area locals almost exclusively refer to the rivalry as the "Bay Bridge Series" or the "Battle of the Bay."

Originally, the term described a series of exhibition games played between the two clubs after the conclusion of spring training, immediately prior to the start of the regular season. It was first used to refer to the 1989 World Series which the Athletics won and the first time both teams had met since they moved to the San Francisco Bay Area. Today, it also refers to games played between the teams during the regular season since the commencement of Interleague play in 1997. Through the 2019 season, the A's have won 63 games, and the Giants have won 57.

Bullet Joe Bush

Leslie Ambrose "Bullet Joe" Bush (November 27, 1892 – November 1, 1974) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher with the Philadelphia Athletics, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, Pittsburgh Pirates and the New York Giants between 1912 and 1928. Bush batted and threw right-handed. He is credited with having developed the forkball pitch.

Eddie Plank

Edward Stewart Plank (August 31, 1875 – February 24, 1926), nicknamed "Gettysburg Eddie", was an American professional baseball player. A pitcher, Plank played in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 through 1914, the St. Louis Terriers in 1915, and the St. Louis Browns in 1916 and 1917.

Plank was the first left-handed pitcher to win 200 games and then 300 games, and now ranks third in all-time wins among left-handers with 326 career victories (eleventh all time) and first all-time in career shutouts by a left-handed pitcher with 66. Philadelphia went to the World Series five times while Plank played there, but he sat out the 1910 World Series due to an injury. Plank had only a 1.32 earned run average (ERA) in his World Series career, but he was unlucky, with a 2–5 win–loss record in those games.

Plank died of a stroke in 1926. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.

Harry Fritz

Harry Koch "Dutchman" Fritz (September 30, 1890 – November 4, 1974) was a third baseman for Major League Baseball teams the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago Whales.

Home Run Baker

John Franklin "Home Run" Baker (March 13, 1886 – June 28, 1963) was an American professional baseball player. A third baseman, Baker played in Major League Baseball from 1908 to 1922, for the Philadelphia Athletics and the New York Yankees. Baker has been called the "original home run king of the majors".Baker was a member of the Athletics' $100,000 infield. He helped the Athletics win the 1910, 1911 and 1913 World Series. After a contract dispute, the Athletics sold Baker to the Yankees, where he and Wally Pipp helped the Yankees' offense. Baker appeared with the Yankees in the 1921 and 1922 World Series, though the Yankees lost both series, before retiring.

Baker led the American League in home runs for four consecutive years, from 1911 through 1914. He had a batting average over .300 in six seasons, had three seasons with more than 100 runs batted in, and two seasons with over 100 runs scored. Baker's legacy has grown over the years, and he is regarded by many as one of the best power hitters of the deadball era. During his 13 years as a major league player, Baker never played a single inning at any position other than third base. Baker was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1955.

Hooks Wiltse

George Leroy "Hooks" Wiltse (September 7, 1879 – January 21, 1959) was a professional baseball pitcher. He played twelve seasons in Major League Baseball from 1904 to 1915. He was the brother of pitcher Snake Wiltse.

"Hooks" earned his nickname because of his exceptional curveball and was one of the earliest pitchers to have a curveball that was regarded as more effective than his fastball. From 1904 to 1914, he pitched for the National League's New York Giants. During that time, he combined with teammate Christy Mathewson for 435 wins, making them one of the best lefty-righty duos in history. Wiltse won five pennants with the Giants and pitched 3.1 innings in the 1911 World Series.

On July 4, 1908, Wiltse pitched a perfect game through 26 batters until he hit Philadelphia Phillies pitcher George McQuillan on a 2–2 count in a scoreless game. This was the only occurrence of a pitcher losing a perfect game with two outs in the ninth inning by hitting a batter until Washington Nationals pitcher Max Scherzer did so on June 20, 2015. Like Wiltse, Scherzer eventually completed a no-hitter, but unlike Wiltse, Scherzer had a 6-0 lead and was able to retire the next batter to end the game. Umpire Cy Rigler later admitted that he should have called the previous pitch strike three, which would have ended the inning. Wiltse pitched on, winning 1–0 in ten innings, with the hit-batsman the only lapse separating him from a perfect game. Wiltse's ten-inning complete game no-hitter still remains a Major League record.As a pitcher, Wiltse was an above average hitter and fielder and was occasionally used as a position player to include playing first base in game two of the 1913 World Series where he cut down two runners at home plate in the ninth inning.In 1915, he jumped to the Brooklyn Tip-Tops of the Federal League, which is where he ended his major league career. He continued to play minor league baseball on and off until 1926. His last appearance came with the Reading Keystones, where he played in five games at the age of 46.Following his retirement from baseball, Hooks returned to his hometown of Syracuse, New York where he worked in real estate and became involved in local politics, serving as a local alderman and property assessor.Wiltse died of emphysema on January 21, 1959 at age 79.

”I missed being the only pitcher of all time to pitch a perfect ten inning game because Cy Rigler miscalled a strike. He admitted afterward he could have called it one. It was a tough break for the next pitch struck McQuillan on the shoulder and put him on first base. It has been a perfect game for eight and two-thirds innings.

Larry Doyle (baseball)

Lawrence Joseph Doyle (July 31, 1886 – March 1, 1974), nicknamed "Laughing Larry", was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1907 to 1920 who played almost his entire career for the New York Giants. The National League's outstanding second baseman during the 1910s, he was awarded the 1912 Chalmers Award as the league's best player, and won the 1915 batting title with a .320 average. The team captain and top everyday star on three consecutive pennant winners (1911–13), his .408 career slugging average was the top mark by an NL second baseman when he retired, as were his career totals in hits (1887), doubles (299), triples (123), total bases (2654) and extra base hits (496). He ended his career among the major league leaders in career games (5th, 1730), putouts (9th, 3635), assists (9th, 4654), total chances (9th, 8732) and double plays (5th, 694) at second base, and set Giants franchise records for career games, at bats and doubles, each of which was broken by Bill Terry.

Lefty Tyler

George Albert "Lefty" Tyler (December 14, 1889 – September 29, 1953) was a professional baseball pitcher from 1910 to 1921.

From 1910 to 1917, Tyler played with the Boston Doves/Boston Braves. He performed well, having an earned run average (ERA) under 3 in all but two years. In 1918, Tyler was traded to the Chicago Cubs for Larry Doyle, Art Wilson, and $15,000. Tyler did well in Chicago as well, having ERA's under 4.

Tyler's career earned run average was 2.95. His brother, Fred Tyler, played in the major leagues in 1914 as a catcher.

In 1914, Tyler was a member of the Braves team that went from last place to first place in two months, becoming the first team to win a pennant after being in last place on the Fourth of July. The team then went on to defeat Connie Mack's heavily favored Philadelphia Athletics in the 1914 World Series.

In 1916, the New York Giants set the current record of 26 wins without a defeat: Tyler beat them to end the streak on September 30, 1916.

He was the winning pitcher in Game 2 of the 1918 World Series for the Cubs, as well as the hard-luck loser of a 2-1 decision in Game 6, the last game of the Series; it was the last win for the opposing Boston Red Sox until 2004.

Tyler was a better than average hitting pitcher in his 12-year major league career, compiling a .217 batting average (189-for-870) with 85 runs, 4 home runs and 73 RBI. He recorded a career-high 20 RBI as a member of the 1916 Boston Braves.

List of World Series champions

The World Series is the annual championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB) and concludes the MLB postseason. First played in 1903, the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff and is a contest between the champions of baseball's National League (NL) and American League (AL). Often referred to as the "Fall Classic", the modern World Series has been played every year since 1903 with two exceptions: in 1904, when the NL champion New York Giants declined to play the AL champion Boston Americans; and in 1994, when the series was canceled due to the players' strike.The best-of-seven style has been the format of all World Series except in 1903, 1919, 1920, and 1921, when the winner was determined through a best-of-nine playoff. Although the large majority of contests have been played entirely during the month of October, a small number of Series have also had games played during September and November. The Series-winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy. Players, coaches and others associated with the team are generally given World Series rings to commemorate their victory; however, they have received other items such as pocket watches and medallions in the past. The winning team is traditionally invited to the White House to meet the President of the United States.

A total of 114 Series have been contested, with the NL champion winning 48 and the AL champion winning 66. The New York Yankees of the AL have played in 40 World Series through 2018—winning 27—the most Series appearances and most victories of any Major League Baseball franchise. The Los Angeles Dodgers of the NL have the most losses with 14. The St. Louis Cardinals have represented the NL 19 times, and won 11 championships, second-most among all teams and most among NL clubs. Both the Giants and the Los Angeles Dodgers have appeared in more World Series, with 20 each.

The Seattle Mariners and the Washington Nationals (formerly Montreal Expos) are the only current Major League Baseball franchises to have never appeared in a World Series; the San Diego Padres, Colorado Rockies, Texas Rangers (formerly the 1961–1971 version of the Washington Senators), Tampa Bay Rays, and Milwaukee Brewers (formerly Seattle Pilots) have all played in the Series but have never won. The Toronto Blue Jays are the only franchise from outside the United States to appear in a World Series, winning in 1992 and 1993. The Houston Astros have represented both the NL (2005) and the AL (2017), winning the Series in 2017. The current World Series champions are the Boston Red Sox.

List of World Series starting pitchers

The following chart lists starting pitchers for each Major League Baseball World Series game.Decisions listed indicate lifetime World Series W/L records as a starting pitcher; a pitcher's wins and losses in World Series relief appearances are not included here.

‡ denotes a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Oakland Athletics

The Oakland Athletics, often referred to as the A's, are an American professional baseball team based in Oakland, California. They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) West division. The team plays its home games at the RingCentral Coliseum. They have won nine World Series championships.

One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the team was founded in Philadelphia in 1901 as the Philadelphia Athletics. They won three World Series championships from 1910 to 1913 and back-to-back titles in 1929 and 1930. The team's owner and manager for its first 50 years was Connie Mack and Hall of Fame players included Chief Bender, Frank "Home Run" Baker, Jimmie Foxx, and Lefty Grove. The team left Philadelphia for Kansas City in 1955 and became the Kansas City Athletics before moving to Oakland in 1968. They won three consecutive World Championships between 1972 and 1974, led by players including Vida Blue, Catfish Hunter, Reggie Jackson, ace reliever Rollie Fingers, and colorful owner Charlie O. Finley. After being sold by Finley to Walter A. Haas Jr., the team won three consecutive pennants and the 1989 World Series behind the "Bash Brothers", Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire, as well as Hall of Famers Dennis Eckersley, Rickey Henderson and manager Tony La Russa.

From 1901 to 2018, the Athletics' overall win–loss record is 8,931–9,387 (.488).

Polo Grounds

The Polo Grounds was the name of three stadiums in Upper Manhattan, New York City, used mainly for professional baseball and American football from 1880 through 1963. As the name suggests, the original Polo Grounds, opened in 1876 and demolished in 1889, was built for the sport of polo. Bound on the south and north by 110th and 112th Streets and on the east and west by Fifth and Sixth (Lenox) Avenues, just north of Central Park, it was converted to a baseball stadium when leased by the New York Metropolitans in 1880. The third Polo Grounds, built in 1890 and renovated after a fire in 1911, is the one generally indicated when the Polo Grounds is referenced. It was located in Coogan's Hollow and was noted for its distinctive bathtub shape, very short distances to the left and right field walls, and an unusually deep center field.

In baseball, the original Polo Grounds was home to the New York Metropolitans from 1880 through 1885, and the New York Giants from 1883 through 1888. The Giants played in the second Polo Grounds for part of the 1889 season and all of the 1890 season, and at the third and fourth Polo Grounds from 1891 through 1957. The Polo Grounds was also the home field of the New York Yankees from 1913 through 1922 and the New York Mets in their first two seasons of 1962 and 1963. All four versions of the ballpark hosted World Series matches at various times. The fourth version also hosted the 1934 and 1942 Major League Baseball All-Star Games.

In football, the third Polo Grounds was home to the New York Brickley Giants for one game in 1921 and the New York Giants from 1925 to 1955. The New York Jets of the American Football League played at the stadium from the league's inaugural season of 1960 through 1963.

Other sporting events held at the Polo Grounds included soccer, boxing, and Gaelic football. The last sporting event at the Polo Grounds was a football game between the New York Jets and the Buffalo Bills on December 14, 1963. Shea Stadium opened in 1964 and replaced the Polo Grounds as the home of the Mets and Jets. The Polo Grounds was demolished over a period of four months that year and a public housing complex, known as the Polo Grounds Towers, was built on the site.

San Francisco Giants

The San Francisco Giants are an American professional baseball team based in San Francisco, California. Founded in 1883 as the New York Gothams, and renamed three years later the New York Giants, the team eventually moved to San Francisco in 1958. The Giants compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) West division.

As one of the longest-established and most successful professional baseball teams, the franchise has won the most games of any team in the history of American baseball. The team was the first major league team based in New York City, most memorably playing at the legendary Polo Grounds. They have won 23 NL pennants and have played in 20 World Series competitions – both NL records. The Giants' eight World Series championships rank second in the National League and fifth overall (the New York Yankees are first with 27, then the St. Louis Cardinals (the National League record-holders) with 11, and the Oakland Athletics and the Boston Red Sox both with 9). The Giants have played in the World Series 20 times – 14 times in New York, six in San Francisco – but boycotted the event in 1904.

Playing as the New York Giants, they won 14 pennants and five World Series championships behind managers such as John McGraw and Bill Terry and players such as Christy Mathewson, Carl Hubbell, Mel Ott, Bobby Thomson, and Willie Mays. The Giants' franchise has the most Hall of Fame players in all of professional baseball. The Giants' rivalry with the Dodgers is one of the longest-standing and biggest rivalries in American sports. The teams began their rivalry as the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers, respectively, before both franchises moved west for the 1958 season.

The Giants have won six pennants and three World Series championships since arriving in San Francisco. Those three championships have come in 2010, 2012, and most recently in 2014, having defeated the Kansas City Royals four games to three during the 2014 World Series.The Giants are the only major professional sports team based in the City and County of San Francisco, following the San Francisco 49ers' relocation to Santa Clara in 2014. They will be joined by the Golden State Warriors once they move to the Chase Center in 2019.

From 1883 to 2018, the Giants' overall win–loss record was 11,088–9,602 (a winning "percentage" of 0.536).

Wally Schang

Walter Henry (Wally) Schang (August 22, 1889 – March 6, 1965) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. From 1913 through 1931, he played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1913–17, 1930), Boston Red Sox (1918–20), New York Yankees (1921–25), St. Louis Browns (1926–29) and Detroit Tigers (1931). Schang was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He was born in South Wales, New York.

1900s–1910s
1920s–1930s
1940s–1950s
1960s–1970s
1980s–1990s
2000s–2010s
Related
Philadelphia Athletics 1913 World Series champions
Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Key personnel
Important figures
World Series
Champions (9)
American League
Championships (15)
AL West Division
Championships (16)
AL Wild Card (3)
Minors
Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Retired numbers
Pre-World Series Champions (2)
Temple Cup Champions (1)
World Series Champions (8)
National League
Championships (23)
Division titles (8)
Wild card (3)
Minor league affiliates

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.