1912 FA Cup Final

The 1912 FA Cup Final was the 41st FA Cup final. It was contested by Barnsley and West Bromwich Albion. It took two matches to determine a winner. The first took place at Crystal Palace on 20 April 1912 and the second on 24 April at Bramall Lane.

1912 FA Cup Final
Event1911–12 FA Cup
Barnsley West Bromwich Albion
Final
Barnsley West Bromwich Albion
0 0
Date20 April 1912
VenueCrystal Palace, London
RefereeJ.R. Schumacher
Attendance54,434
Replay
Barnsley West Bromwich Albion
1 0
Date24 April 1912
VenueBramall Lane, Sheffield
RefereeJ.R. Schumacher
Attendance38,555

Road to the Final[1]

Barnsley

Home teams listed first. Round 1: Birmingham 0–0 Barnsley

Replay: Barnsley 3–1 Birmingham

Lillycrop 2,[2] TBC

Round 2: Barnsley 1–0 Leicester Fosse

Lillycrop[2]

Round 3: Bolton Wanderers 1–2 Barnsley

Lillycrop, Leavey[2]

Round 4: Barnsley 0–0 Bradford City

Replay: Bradford City 0–0 Barnsley

Replay: Barnsley 0–0 Bradford City

Replay: Barnsley 3–2 Bradford City

Lillycrop 2, Travers (aet)[2]
(at Bramall Lane)

Semi-final: Barnsley 0–0 Swindon Town

(at Stamford Bridge)

Replay: Barnsley 1–0 Swindon Town

Bratley[2]
(at Meadow Lane Nottingham)

West Bromwich Albion

Home teams listed first. Round 1: West Bromwich Albion 3–0 Tottenham Hotspur

Round 2: Leeds City 0–1 West Bromwich Albion

Round 3: Sunderland 1–2 West Bromwich Albion

Round 4: West Bromwich Albion 3–1 Fulham

Semi-final: Blackburn 0–0 West Bromwich Albion

(at Anfield)

Replay: Blackburn 0–1 West Bromwich Albion

(at Hillsborough)

Match programme

The programme showed that both teams played a 2–3–5 formation.[1]

Match summary

WBA team FA cup finalists 1912
The West Bromwich Albion team that played in the 1912 FA Cup Final.

The crowd that assembled to watch the 1912 FA Cup Final was some 15–20,000 smaller than previous years but they still filled the ground and there was little spare space. Some spectators took to the trees around the ground and a group of WBA supporters tried to launch a blue and white striped hot air ballon but it burned before it left the ground.[3] This failed stunt became a metaphor for a game that also failed to rise to meet the spectators expectations.

Barnsley did not play an exciting game of football; relying on their half backs to run alongside the WBA forwards making the WBA game of pass and return between their forwards and half backs too dangerous. Barnsley then tried to score on the break. But the WBA backs, led by Pennington, were able to contain the threat. This led to a stalemate, with WBA unable to play their normal game and Barnsley unable to push their advantage.[3]

WBA had a couple of chances early in the first half when Cooper, the Barnsley goalkeeper, fumbled a shot from Baddeley but he did not have any support. Cooper was again tested when Jephcott centred the ball several times but again WBA did not press home the advantage. Barnsley had similar problems exploiting an advantage when Tufnell and Bartrop got through unmarked on the right wing. The Manchester Guardian felt that WBA had the better run of play in the first half but by the end of the second half felt the teams were evenly matched.[3]

There were some exciting moments towards the end. The first came when Pearson, the WBA goalkeeper mishandled a centring pass from Moore and Barnsley managed two shots the first rebounding from a WBA player, the second from the woodwork. Moments from the end of the match Buck a WBA player had his best chance but hit a goal post.[3]

The third drawn FA Cup Final in as many years drew aggravated comments from the departing crowds.[3]

The Manchester Guardian felt the best players were the backs and half backs on each side, singling out Pennington and Buck on the WBA side for praise and Downs along with Glendinning for Barnsley. They also felt that Jephcott, the WBA wing had had a good match, with several good centring passes.[3]

Match details

Barnsley0–0West Bromwich Albion
Barnsley
West Bromwich Albion
GK Jack Cooper
FB Dickie Downs
FB Archie Taylor (c)
HB Bob Glendenning
CH Philip Bratley
HB George Utley
OF Wilfred Bartrop
IF Harry Tufnell
CF George Lillycrop
IF George Travers
OF Jimmy Moore
Manager:
Arthur Fairclough
GK Hubert Pearson
FB Arthur Cook
FB Jesse Pennington (c)
HB George Baddeley
CH Fred Buck
HB Bobby McNeal
OF Claude Jephcott
IF Harry Wright
CF Bob Pailor
IF Sid Bowser
OF Ben Shearman
Secretary-manager:
Fred Everiss

Replay summary

Albion's run in the cup, combined with several postponements from the early part of the season, meant that they were forced to play seven games in ten days at the end of the campaign. This included an away match at Everton on 22 April, in-between the final and the replay. Albion lost the match 3–0 with a reserve side and were fined £150 by The Football League for fielding a weakened team, although nine of the eleven players had previously played in the league for the first team.[4]

To the frustration of the supporters the play during the replay was not much better than the original match. WBA's tactics had improved and they had the better of the play through most of the match but they failed to take their chances when they were presented. Pailor and Shearman missed a centring pass provided by Jephcott. Later in the second half Pailor almost got a shot past Cooper, who failed to control the ball, Glendinning saved the situation for Barnsley by kicking the ball into touch. Barnsley also tested the WBA goal, mainly Bartrop on the right wing. One of his shots in the first half had to be cleared off the line by Baddeley after Pearson fumbled the save.[5]

As the game ran into extra time, the Guardian commented that given the sunny and hot conditions the energy of the players was impressive and the pace of the game picked up. Apart from a brief attack on their goal by Travers and Moore the play was all with WBA until the last two minutes of extra time. Glendinning dribbled the ball out of a ruck in the Barnsley half and passed the ball to Tufnell, who was on the halfway line. Pennington, who had had an otherwise flawless game was bypassed as Tufnell kicked the ball past Penningtons right and then ran around his left side. Cook and Buck seeing the danger ran back, but they were too late. Within a few seconds Tufnell was in front of the goal. Pearson came off his line to narrow the angle and stamped his feet as he waited for the shot. Despite the pressure on him, Tufnell's shot was perfect; fast, low and out of Pearsons reach, it found the corner of the net.[5]

The Barnsley players hugged and kissed Tufnell as they celebrated his goal knowing that they could hold on for the final 2 minutes.[5] The gate receipts for the replay were £2615 and a collection was held for the Titanic Disaster Fund which received a total of £49 1s 2d.[5] The players travelled by motor back to Barnsley and were cheered through the streets of Sheffield as they held the cup to show the crowd. They arrived in Barnsley in the early evening to a great welcome.[5]

In discussing the players, the Guardian praised the Barnsley backs of Taylor & Downs, though Pennington for WBA also played well. Of the half backs Glendinning of Barnsley and McNeal from WBA judged to be the best on the day. When considering the WBA forwards Shearman, Bowser and Jephcot were praised, but Pailor in the centre had not made the best of the supply of crosses. Of the Barnsley forwards, Bartrop and Travers were the best.[5]

The victorious Barnsley team presented the match ball to Tiverton Preedy, the clergyman who had founded the club. It was displayed in his study until his death in 1928, whereupon it was returned to the club.

Replay details

Barnsley1–0
(a.e.t)
West Bromwich Albion
Tufnell Goal 118'
Barnsley
West Bromwich Albion
GK Jack Cooper
FB Dickie Downs
FB Archie Taylor (c)
HB Bob Glendenning
CH Philip Bratley
HB George Utley
OF Wilfred Bartrop
IF Harry Tufnell
CF George Lillycrop
IF George Travers
OF Jimmy Moore
Manager:
Arthur Fairclough
GK Hubert Pearson
FB Arthur Cook
FB Jesse Pennington (c)
HB George Baddeley
CH Fred Buck
HB Bobby McNeal
OF Claude Jephcott
IF Harry Wright
CF Bob Pailor
IF Sid Bowser
OF Ben Shearman
Secretary-manager:
Fred Everiss
  • 90 minutes.
  • Replay if necessary.
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if scores still level.
  • No substitutes

References

  1. ^ a b "fa-cupfinals.co.uk". fa-cupfinals.co.uk. Archived from the original on 23 July 2008. Retrieved 26 February 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e "1911-1912-FA Cup Success". Barnsley F.C. Archived from the original on 9 March 2008. Retrieved 5 March 2008.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "The Cup Final". Manchester Guardian. 22 April 1912. p. 3.
  4. ^ Matthews, Tony; Mackenzie, Colin (1987). Albion! A Complete Record of West Bromwich Albion 1879–1987. Breedon Books. p. 240. ISBN 0-907969-23-2.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Barnsley's Victory". Manchester Guardian. 25 April 1912. p. 4.

External links

Barnsley F.C.

Barnsley Football Club is a professional association football club based in the town of Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England. The team play in the Championship, the second tier of the English football league system. Nicknamed "the Tykes", they were founded in 1887 by Reverend Tiverton Preedy under the name Barnsley St. Peter's. The club's colours were originally blue, but were converted to red and white in 1904 and have played in those colours ever since. Their home ground since 1888 has been Oakwell.

Barnsley won the FA Cup in 1911–12 and were also runners-up in 1909–10. The club won two trophies at Wembley Stadium in 2016 – the Football League Trophy, beating Oxford United 3–2 in the final, and the 2016 Football League play-offs, beating Millwall 3–1 in the final. Barnsley became only the second club to secure both the Football League Trophy and Football League promotion via playoff finals in the same season, after Grimsby Town F.C..

On 19 December 2017, it was announced that Patrick Cryne and family had agreed to sell a majority stake in Barnsley Football Club to a consortium involving Chien Lee of NewCity Capital, Grace Hung and Paul Conway of Pacific Media Group, Indian businessman Neerav Parekh and baseball legend Billy Beane. The new consortium holds 80% of the shares and the Cryne family holds 20% of the shares of Barnsley Football club. Barnsley fans often consider their biggest rivals to be Sheffield Wednesday, Sheffield United and Leeds United, although smaller rivalries with Doncaster Rovers, Rotherham United, Huddersfield Town and Bradford City exist.

Ben Shearman

Benjamin 'Ben' W. Shearman (2 December 1884 – October 1958) was an English footballer who played as an outside left. Born in Lincoln he came to the fore with Rotherham Town before having spells with Bristol City, West Bromwich Albion and Nottingham Forest. He gained an FA Cup losers medal whilst with West Brom having played in the 1912 final. Despite missing four years of his career due to World War I he made 217 appearances in the [[Football.

Bobby McNeal

Robert McNeal (19 January 1891 – 12 May 1956) was an English footballer who played as a left-half. Despite his career running through World War I he managed nearly 400 appearances in the Football League for West Bromwich Albion, playing in some of the most successful seasons in the club's history. He won the Second Division (1910–11), First Division (1919–20), and Charity Shield (1920), and played in the 1912 FA Cup Final.

Dick Betteley

Richard Harold Betteley (14 July 1880 – 3 August 1942) was an English footballer who played for both Black Country clubs, Wolverhampton Wanderers and West Bromwich Albion.

Betteley turned professional in August 1901 when he joined First Division Wolverhampton Wanderers from nearby non-league side Bilston United. He made his Football League debut on 28 March 1902 in a 3–5 defeat at Notts County. He held his place in the team and missed just two games over the next two seasons, but found himself under pressure for his place in the 1905–06 campaign. He left for local rivals West Bromwich Albion at the season's end as Wolves dropped out of the top flight.

He made his Albion debut in September 1906 in a Second Division match away at Burnley. He won a Second Division championship medal with the club in 1910–11 campaign, but failed to make the team that played in the 1912 FA Cup Final. He left Albion in May 1912 to rejoin Bilston United, before retiring in May 1914.

He died in Wolverhampton on 3 August 1942.

George Travers

James Edward Travers (4 November 1888 – 31 August 1946), known as George Travers, was an English professional footballer who played as an inside forward or centre forward. He made 164 appearances in the Football League, representing a number of clubs prior to and just after the First World War.

Harry Wright (disambiguation)

Harry Wright (1835–1895) was an English-born American baseball player, manager and developer.

Harry Wright may also refer to:

Harry Wright (footballer, born 1888) (1888–1950), English footballer best known for playing for West Bromwich Albion, see 1912 FA Cup Final

Harry Wright (footballer, born 1900) (1900–?), English footballer best known for playing for Gillingham

Harry Wright (Australian footballer) (1870–1950), Australian rules footballer

Harry Wright (footballer, born 1909) (1909–1994), English football coach

Harry Wright (Canadian politician) (1875–?), politician in British Columbia, Canada

Harry Wright (Queensland politician) (1890–1963), member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly

Harry N. Wright (1881–1969), president of the City College of New York

Harry Wright (American football) (1919–1993), American football player and coach

Hubert Pearson

Hubert Pryer Pearson (15 May 1886 – October 1955) was an English professional footballer who played as a goalkeeper for West Bromwich Albion.

James Moore (footballer, born 1891)

James Moore (1 September 1891 – December 1972) was an English professional footballer, who played as a forward for various clubs, including Barnsley, either side of the First World War. He was on the Barnsley club that won the FA Cup in 1912.

Jephcott

Jephcott is a surname and may refer to:

Alfred Jephcott (1853–1932), English trade unionist and Conservative Member of Parliament for Birmingham Yardley 1918–1929

Sir Harry Jephcott (1891–1978), English pharmaceutical industrialist

Avun Jephcott (born 1983), English professional footballer

Claude Jephcott, English professional footballer, played in the 1912 FA Cup Final

Dominic Jephcott (born 1957), English actor

Tiverton Preedy

Tiverton Preedy (22 January 1863 – 26 April 1928) was an English clergyman who worked in Yorkshire and London from 1887 until his death, where he was noted for his work with the poor. He was particularly interested in the use of sport within ministry, and founded a church football team in the town of Barnsley which became the modern Barnsley F.C.

In 1883 he moved to London to become curate of a church in Islington, and later opened a nearby mission. He opened a boxing club at the mission and organised dances for local flower sellers. In recognition of his work, he was appointed a prebendary of St. Pauls Cathedral in 1926. He died two years later and is buried in Islington Cemetery. In the 1990s supporters of Barnsley F.C. located and restored his grave.

Seasons
Qualifying rounds
Finals
FA Cup Finals
League Cup Finals
FA Charity Shields
Football League play-off Finals
Other matches
FA competitions
Football and Southern Leagues
Lower leagues
Related to national team

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.