1910 FA Cup Final

The 1910 FA Cup Final was the 39th FA Cup final. It was contested by Barnsley and Newcastle United. It took two matches to determine a winner. The first took place at Crystal Palace in south London on 23 April 1910 and the second on 28 April at Goodison Park in Liverpool.

1910 FA Cup Final
Event1909-10 FA Cup
Barnsley Newcastle United
1 1
Date23 April 1910
VenueCrystal Palace, London
RefereeJ.T. Ibbotson
Attendance77,747
1910 FA Cup Final Replay
Event1909-10 FA Cup
Barnsley Newcastle United
0 2
Date28 April 1910
VenueGoodison Park, Liverpool
RefereeJ.T. Ibbotson
Attendance60,000

Road to the Final[1]

Barnsley

Home teams listed first.

Round 1: Blackpool 1–1 Barnsley

Tufnell 1[2]

Replay: Barnsley 6–0 Blackpool

Tufnell 2, Lillycrop 2,[2] TBC

Round 2: Bristol Rovers 0–4 Barnsley

Round 3: Barnsley 1–0 West Bromwich Albion

Round 4: Barnsley 1–0 Queens Park Rangers

Bartrop 1[2]

Semi-final: Barnsley 0–0 Everton

(at Elland Road)[2]

Replay: Barnsley 3–0 Everton

Gadsby,Tufnell,Forman[2]
(at Old Trafford)[2]

Newcastle United

Home teams listed first.

Round 1: Stoke City 1–1 Newcastle United

Replay: Newcastle United 2–1 Stoke City

Round 2: Newcastle United 4–0 Fulham

Round 3: Newcastle United 3–1 Blackburn Rovers

Round 4: Newcastle United 3–0 Leicester Fosse

Semi-final: Newcastle United 2–0 Swindon

(at White Hart Lane)

Match summary

The match was a hard fought affair, the Manchester Guardian commenting that Barnsley played "one man for the man, another for the ball".[3] Barnsley had the better of the play through the first half.[3] Barnsley played a simple game based on long, low passes into space combined with dribbling individual runs which Newcastle found difficult to counter. Barnsley scored 10 minutes before half time. Bartrop picked up a pass from the Barnsley backs and ran up the pitch, passed McWilliam and kicked the ball across the Newcastle goal mouth. Lillycrop rushing forward tried to score, but missed the ball. It appeared Barnsley had missed their chance, but Tufnell, the left inside forward, managed to get a toe to the ball and put it in the net.[3] After half time Barnsley sat back and defended but it was not until the final 15 minutes that Newcastle were able to mount an effective attack. They abandoned what the Guardian correspondent characterised as their "clever" football and took on Barnsley by running at them. Shepherd had a goal disallowed apparently for offside.[4] Rutherford eventually scored for Newcastle with a header 8 minutes before full-time. Veitch led more attacks but the Barnsley backs held them off. Downs in particular was very effective with his head and feet.[3][4]

The game ended 1–1.

The Times correspondent was very disappointed with the game and felt the one all score line fair.[4] The Guardian was much more enthusiastic the game and in particular about Barnsleys play and felt they should have won.[3]

The Barnsley team were invited to the Alhambra where scenes from the match were shown.[4]

Match details

Barnsley1–1Newcastle United
Tufnell Goal 37' Rutherford Goal 83'
Barnsley
Newcastle United
GK Fred Mearns
FB Dickie Downs
FB Harry Ness
HB Bob Glendenning
CH Tommy Boyle (c)
HB George Utley
OF Wilfred Bartrop
IF Harry Tufnell
CF George Lillycrop
IF Ernie Gadsby
OF Tom Forman
Manager:
Arthur Fairclough
GK Jimmy Lawrence
FB Bill McCracken
FB Tony Whitson
HB Colin Veitch (c)
CH Wilf Low
HB Peter McWilliam
OF Jock Rutherford
IF James Howie
CF Albert Shepherd
IF Sandy Higgins
OF George Wilson
Secretary-manager:
Frank Watt

Replay summary

The replay was held at Everton's ground Goodison Park. The Manchester Guardian felt this was unfair to Barnsley as they had put Everton out of the FA Cup following a hard fought semi-final that also went to a replay and as a result any local supporters would hardly be neutral.[3] Despite heavy rain a large excitable crowd turned out to watch the match, spilling onto the pitch before kick off they had to be restrained by mounted police (200 to 300 also invaded the pitch during the match but did not interfere with play). Jack Carr replaced an injured Tony Whiston in the Newcastle defence. The pitch was very heavy after the rain but nonetheless the play was fast and exciting.[5]

The Newcastle team was considerably improved. The half backs held the Barnsley forward line throughout the match. The defence was also improved with Carr playing much better than Whiston. Lawrence in goal was troubled only once, when caught off his line he was forced to make a diving save when Bartrop broke through.[5]

The Newcastle forward line was also improved. They received good passes from the half backs and made use of them. Wilson and Higgins on the left wing doing most of the work in the first half, Rutherford and Howie on the right in the second half. Newcastle could have scored several times in the first half but both goals came in the second, the second a penalty, both were scored by Shepherd.[5]

Barnsley played their hard, rough game but they were defeated by a rejuvenated Newcastle team who despite the heavy, wet ground played a mixed game blending long passes with dribbling and runs forward.

The Cup was presented by Lord Derby and medals by the Lady Mayoress of Liverpool. They were thanked by the MP for Barnsley Mr F. E. Smith K.C. M.P. The speeches were largely drowned out by the cheering of the crowd who occupied most of the pitch.[5]

Replay details

Barnsley0–2Newcastle United
Shepherd Goal 52' Goal 62' (pen)
Barnsley
Newcastle United
GK Fred Mearns
FB Dickie Downs
FB Harry Ness
HB Bob Glendenning
CH Tommy Boyle (c)
HB George Utley
OF Wilfred Bartrop
IF Harry Tufnell
CF George Lillycrop
IF Ernie Gadsby
OF Tom Forman
Manager:
Arthur Fairclough
GK Jimmy Lawrence
FB Bill McCracken
FB Jack Carr
HB Colin Veitch (c)
CH Wilf Low
HB Peter McWilliam
OF Jock Rutherford
IF James Howie
CF Albert Shepherd
IF Sandy Higgins
OF George Wilson
Secretary-manager:
Frank Watt

Match and replay rules

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary.
  • Replay if scores still level.
  • No substitutes

Legacy

A souvenir booklet produced for the match fetched £3,000 at auction in September 2008.[6]

References

  1. ^ "fa-cupfinals.co.uk". fa-cupfinals.co.uk. Archived from the original on 24 June 2008. Retrieved 24 June 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "1887-1911-The Beginnings". Barnsley F.C. Archived from the original on 3 March 2008. Retrieved 27 June 2008.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "The Cup Final". Manchester Guardian. 25 April 1910. p. 10.
  4. ^ a b c d "The Football Association Cup. Final Tie", The Times, 25 April 1910
  5. ^ a b c d "The Football Association Cup. Victory of Newcastle United", The Times, 29 April 1910
  6. ^ "Cup final booklet sold for £3,000". BBC News. 26 September 2008. Archived from the original on 30 September 2008. Retrieved 9 November 2008.

External links

Albert Shepherd

Albert Shepherd (10 September 1885 – 8 November 1929) was an English professional footballer who played as a forward. He began his career with amateur side Bolton Temperance before signing for First Division club Blackburn Rovers but was released a year later having made no appearances. He instead joined Second Division side Bolton Wanderers and was eventually handed his professional debut in 1904. Shepherd won promotion in his first full season with Bolton and the following year he finished as the top goalscorer in the First Division. His form led to call ups for the Football League representative XI and the England national football team, scoring on his debut for both sides in 1906.

He joined Newcastle United in 1908, winning the First Division title and becoming the first player for Newcastle to reach thirty goals in a single season during the 1909–10 season, including scoring both goals in the 1910 FA Cup Final during a 2–0 victory over Barnsley. He gained a second cap for England in 1911 before his career was halted after sustaining a serious knee injury that kept him out for over a year. After struggling to regain form after his return, he was sold to Bradford City where he spent one season before retiring. During his career, he scored over 150 goals in the Football League in 241 appearances.

Dickie Downs

John Thomas "Dickie" Downs was a footballer who played for Barnsley and Everton. He was a Full Back

Frederick Mearns

Frederick Mearns (31 March 1879 – 22 January 1931) was a footballer who played for Hartlepool United and Barnsley. He was a goalkeeper. During his time with Barnsley, he was an FA Cup finalist in 1910. Mearns later worked as a trainer for Durham City.

Goodison Park

Goodison Park is a football stadium in Walton, Liverpool, England that has been home to Premier League club Everton since its completion in 1892. The stadium is in a residential area two miles (3 km) from Liverpool city centre. It has an all-seated capacity of 39,572.

Goodison Park has hosted more top-flight games than any other stadium in England as Everton have remained in the top tier of English football since 1954. The club has only been outside the top division for four seasons, having been relegated in 1930 and 1951.

As well as hosting Everton games, the stadium has been the venue for an FA Cup Final and numerous international fixtures, including several in the 1966 World Cup.

Harry Ness

Harry Marshall Ness (8 June 1885 – 26 June 1957) was an English footballer who played for Barnsley and Sunderland. He was a Full Back.

Tom Forman (footballer)

For other people of the same name see Thomas Forman (disambiguation)Thomas Forman (26 October 1879 – after 1911) was a professional footballer who played for Nottingham Forest, Manchester City, Sutton Town, Barnsley, Tottenham Hotspur and Sutton Junction.

Seasons
Qualifying rounds
Finals
FA competitions
Football and Southern Leagues
Lower leagues
Related to national team
FA Cup Finals
League Cup Finals
FA Charity Shields
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup Final
UEFA Intertoto Cup Finals
Other matches
The club
Matches

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.