1908 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1908 throughout the world.

List of years in baseball

Champions

Statistical leaders

American League National League
AVG Ty Cobb DET .324 Honus Wagner PIT .354
HR Sam Crawford DET 7 Tim Jordan BKN 12
RBI Ty Cobb DET 108 Honus Wagner PIT 109
Wins Ed Walsh CHW 40 Christy Mathewson NYG 37
ERA Addie Joss CLE 1.16   Christy Mathewson NYG 1.43  
Ks Ed Walsh CHW 269 Christy Mathewson NYG 259

Major league baseball final standings

American League final standings

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Detroit Tigers 90 63 0.588 44–33 46–30
Cleveland Naps 90 64 0.584 ½ 51–26 39–38
Chicago White Sox 88 64 0.579 51–25 37–39
St. Louis Browns 83 69 0.546 46–31 37–38
Boston Red Sox 75 79 0.487 15½ 37–40 38–39
Philadelphia Athletics 68 85 0.444 22 46–30 22–55
Washington Senators 67 85 0.441 22½ 43–32 24–53
New York Highlanders 51 103 0.331 39½ 30–47 21–56

National League final standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Chicago Cubs 99 55 0.643 47–30 52–25
New York Giants 98 56 0.636 1 52–25 46–31
Pittsburgh Pirates 98 56 0.636 1 42–35 56–21
Philadelphia Phillies 83 71 0.539 16 43–34 40–37
Cincinnati Reds 73 81 0.474 26 40–37 33–44
Boston Doves 63 91 0.409 36 35–42 28–49
Brooklyn Superbas 53 101 0.344 46 27–50 26–51
St. Louis Cardinals 49 105 0.318 50 28–49 21–56

Events

January–March

  • February 27 – The sacrifice fly rule is adopted. No time at bat is charged if a run scores after the catch of a fly ball. The rule will be repealed in 1931, then reinstated (or changed) several times before gaining permanent acceptance in 1954.

April–June

July–September

October–December

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January–April

  • January 14 – Sim Bullas, 45, outfielder for the 1884 Toledo Blue Stockings.
  • January 14 – Henry Krug, 41, utility for the 1902 Philadelphia Phillies.
  • February 20 – Wallace Terry, 57, first baseman/outfielder for the 1875 Washington Nationals.
  • March 12 – Fred Ketcham, 32, outfielder for the Louisville Colonels (1899) and Philadelphia Athletics (1901).
  • March 27 – Forrest Crawford, 26, shortstop who played 1906 through 1907 for the St. Louis Cardinals.
  • March 30 – Charlie Sweasy, 60, second baseman for 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings. Played seven years in the National Association and the National League.
  • April 6 – Jim Brown, 47, pitcher and outfielder for two seasons, 1884 and 1886.
  • April 10 – Mike Griffin, 43, center fielder for Baltimore and Brooklyn who batted .300 six times, scored 100 runs ten times; led league in runs and doubles once each.
  • April 13 – John Kelly, 49, 19th century catcher, manager and umpire.
  • April 20 – Henry Chadwick, 83, the "Father of Baseball", who through his writings, analysis of statistics and service in developing the sport's rules played a principal role in establishing baseball as the "national pastime"; devised the box score, developed scoring system which enabled recording of every play, authored the first rule book in 1858, and created statistics including batting average and earned run average; worked to revise sport's rules so as to balance offense and defense, and to increase mental demands as well as physical ones.

May–August

  • May 9 – Charlie Nyce, 37, shortstop for the 1895 Boston Beaneaters.
  • May 14 – John O'Connell, 35, played in only the 1891 and 1902 season.
  • May 24 – Pete Hasney, for the 1890 Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association.
  • June 16 – Ned Garvin, 34, pitcher who posted a 57-97 record and a 2.72 ERA for five different teams between 1896 and 1904.
  • June 22 – Everett Mills, 63, first baseman for six seasons, 1871–1876.
  • June 23 – Bill Traffley, 38, catcher for the 1878 Chicago White Stockings.
  • July 18 – John Brown, 31, pitcher for the 1897 Brooklyn Bridegrooms.
  • July 22 – Pete Sommers, 41, catcher who played with six clubs from 1897 to 1890.
  • August 19 – Doc Bushong, 51, catcher for 13 seasons (1875–1876, 1880–1890), who played on five league championship teams.
  • August 20 – Marty Honan, 39, catcher for the 1891 Chicago Colts of the National League.
  • August 24 – George Meister, 44, German third baseman who hit .194 in 34 games for the 1884 Toledo Blue Stockings.

September–December

  • September 7 – Bill Morgan, 52, outfielder and shortstop who played with the Pittsburgh Alleghenys (1883) and Washington Nationals (1884).
  • September 14 – Ike Van Zandt, 32, outfielder and pitcher who played for the New York Giants (1901), Chicago Cubs (1904) and St. Louis Browns (1905).
  • September 18 – Dickey Pearce, 72, shortstop (in the sport's earliest era) whose career spanned the years 1856 to 1877; introduced the bunt and pioneered defensive play at his position, later became an umpire.
  • September 28 – Tom Pratt, 64, played at first base for one game with the 1871 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • November 5 – Pat Hannivan, 42, outfielder and second baseman for the 1897 Brooklyn Bridegrooms.
  • December 8 – Frank Griffith, 36, pitcher for the Chicago Cubs (1892) and Cleveland Spiders (1894).
  • December 10 – Wild Bill Widner, 41, pitcher who posted a 22-36 record and a 4.36 ERA with the Red Stockings, Nationals, Solons and Kelly's Killers from 1887 to 1891.
  • December 19 – Reddy Foster, 44, pinch hitter for the 1896 New York Giants.
  • December 26 – Charlie Householder, 52, third baseman/left fielder/shortstop who hit .239 in 83 games for the 1884 Chicago/Pittsburgh team of the Union Association.
  • December 26 – Shadow Pyle, 47, pitcher for the Philadelphia Quakers (1884) and Chicago White Stockings (1887).

Bibliography

  • Fleming, G.H. (2006). The Unforgettable Season. Bison Books. ISBN 0-8032-6922-6.
  • Murphy, Cait (2007). Crazy '08: How a Cast of Cranks, Rogues, Boneheads, and Magnates Created the Greatest Year in Baseball History. Collins. ISBN 0-06-088937-3.
1908 Major League Baseball season

The 1908 Major League Baseball season. The Chicago Cubs defeated the Detroit Tigers 4–1 to win the World Series.

1908 Nashville vs. New Orleans baseball game

The 1908 Nashville vs. New Orleans baseball game dubbed by Grantland Rice "The Greatest Game Ever Played in Dixie" was a 1–0 pitching duel to decide the Southern Association championship in the dead-ball era, on the last day of the season. The Nashville Vols won the game and thus the pennant by .002 percentage points, after finishing the prior season in last place. Both teams had the same number of losses (56), but the New Orleans Pelicans were in first place with 76 wins to the Vols' second-place 74. Carl Sitton used his spitball to out-pitch Ted Breitenstein for a complete-game, nine-strikeout, four-hit, shutout. According to one account, "By one run, by one point, Nashville has won the Southern League pennant, nosing New Orleans out literally by an eyelash. Saturday's game, which was the deciding one, between Nashville and New Orleans was the greatest exhibition of the national game ever seen in the south and the finish in the league race probably sets a record in baseball history".Nashville scored in the seventh inning with the bases loaded. With two outs, catcher Ed Hurlburt hit a single. Then Sitton did too. Harry "Deerfoot" Bay bunted perfectly down the third base line, Bay's fondest memory in his long baseball career. Julius Augustus "Doc" Wiseman then drove in the winning run. Sitton was thrown out at home after Hurlburt scored. The time of the game was one hour and forty-two minutes.

1998 National League Wild Card tie-breaker game

The 1998 National League wild-card tie-breaker game was a one-game extension to Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1998 regular season, played between the Chicago Cubs and San Francisco Giants to determine the winner of the National League (NL) wild card. The game took place at Wrigley Field in Chicago, on September 28, 1998. The Cubs won the game 5–3, holding the Giants scoreless for the majority of the game until the Giants threatened heavily in the ninth inning and scored all three of their runs. As a result of the game, the Cubs qualified for the postseason and the Giants did not.

The game was necessary after both teams finished the season with identical win–loss records of 89–73. The Cubs won a coin flip late in the season which, by rule at the time, awarded them home field for the game. This victory advanced the Cubs to the 1998 NL Division Series (NLDS) where they were swept by the Atlanta Braves, ending the Cubs' season. Michael Jordan, a popular Chicago sportsman then ending his career with the Chicago Bulls, threw the game's ceremonial first pitch. In baseball statistics, the tie-breaker counted as the 163rd regular season game for both teams, with all events in the game added to regular season statistics.

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