1902 FA Cup Final

The 1902 FA Cup Final was contested by Sheffield United and Southampton at Crystal Palace. Southampton became the last team from outside The Football League to reach the final of the FA Cup. The match finished 1–1 after extra time, with the goals scored by Alf Common for Sheffield United and Harry Wood for Southampton.

In the replay, which also took place at Crystal Palace, Sheffield United won 2–1, with goals from George Hedley and Billy Barnes. Albert Brown scored Southampton's goal.

1902 FA Cup Final
Event1901–02 FA Cup
Sheffield United Southampton
Final
Sheffield United Southampton
1 1
Date19 April 1902
VenueCrystal Palace, London
RefereeTom Kirkham
Attendance76,914
Weather"Bitterly cold"
Replay
Sheffield United Southampton
2 1
Date26 April 1902
VenueCrystal Palace, London
RefereeTom Kirkham
Attendance33,068

Route to the final

  • Sheffield United
Round 1 - Northampton Town ( A ) 2–0
Round 2 - Bolton Wanderers ( H ) 2–1
Round 3 - Newcastle United ( A ) 1–1
Replay - Newcastle United ( H ) 2–1
Semi-final - Derby County ( N ) 1–1
Replay - Derby County ( N ) 1–1
Second replay - Derby County ( N ) 1–0
  • Southampton
Round 1 - Tottenham Hotspur ( A ) 1–1
Replay - Tottenham Hotspur ( H ) 2–2
Second replay - Tottenham Hotspur ( N ) 2–1
Round 2 - Liverpool ( H ) 4–1
Round 3 - Bury ( A ) 3–2
Semi-final - Nottingham Forest ( N ) 3–1

Match reports

First match

The first match was played at Crystal Palace on 19 April 1902 in front of a crowd of 76,914.

Sheffield United opened the scoring early in the second half with a goal from Alf Common. United appeared to be on the way to victory when, with two minutes to play, Saints' captain Harry Wood equalised. Wood was in an offside position tying up his bootlaces when the ball reached him. After consultation between the referee and his linesman, the officials decided that the ball had struck a United defender thus playing Wood onside.

Foulke's protest

William Henry Foulke
Sheffield United goalkeeper William "Fatty" Foulke

At the end of the game United's goalkeeper, William "Fatty" Foulke, protested to the officials that the equalising goal should not have been allowed. Foulke, who was reputed to weigh more than 20 stone, left his dressing room unclothed and angrily pursued the referee, Mr. T. Kirkham, who took refuge in a broom cupboard. Foulke had to be stopped by a group of F.A. officials from wrenching the cupboard door from its hinges to reach the hapless referee.[1]

Replay

The replay took place a week later on 26 April 1902, again at Crystal Palace, in front of a crowd of 33,068, less than half the number who had watched the first match.

The weather for the replay was bitterly cold, and two minutes into the game, Saints' goalkeeper Jack Robinson slipped to allow George Hedley to score. Saints pressed for an equaliser and Foulke was kept busy throughout the rest of the first half. The pressure continued after half-time and Albert Brown equalised on the 70th minute with a shot from distance following a pass from Joe Turner.[2]

After drawing level Saints continued on the attack and Foulke was required to make saves from Chadwick, Wood and Lee. It looked as though the match was going into extra-time, when, with ten minutes remaining, Robinson failed to cut out a cross and Billy Barnes only had to "walk" the ball into the unguarded net to score the winner for United.

Match details

Sheffield United1–1Southampton
Common Goal 55' [3] Wood Goal 88'
Sheffield United
Southampton[1]
Willie Foulke
Harry Thickett
Peter Boyle
Ernest Needham (c)
Bernie Wilkinson
Harry Johnson
Walter Bennett
Alf Common
George Hedley
Fred Priest
Bert Lipsham
Club Secretary:
John Nicholson
Jack Robinson
Charles Burgess Fry
George Molyneux
Samuel Meston
Tommy Bowman
Bert Lee
Archie Turner
Harry Wood (c)
Albert Brown
Edgar Chadwick
Joe Turner
Manager:
Ernest Arnfield

Replay

Sheffield United2–1Southampton
Hedley Goal 2'
Barnes Goal 79'
[3] Brown Goal 70'
Sheffield United
Southampton[5]
Willie Foulke
Harry Thickett
Peter Boyle
Ernest Needham (c)
Bernie Wilkinson
Harry Johnson
Billy Barnes
Alf Common
George Hedley
Fred Priest
Bert Lipsham
Club Secretary:
John Nicholson
Jack Robinson
Charles Burgess Fry
George Molyneux
Samuel Meston
Tommy Bowman
Bert Lee
Archie Turner
Harry Wood (c)
Albert Brown
Edgar Chadwick
Joe Turner
Manager:
Ernest Arnfield

Match rules

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary.
  • Replay if scores still level.
  • No substitutes

References

  1. ^ a b David Bull & Bob Brunskell (2000). Match of the Millennium. Hagiology Publishing. pp. 30–33. ISBN 0-9534474-1-3.
  2. ^ Gary Chalk & Duncan Holley (1987). Saints - A complete record. Breedon Books. p. 30. ISBN 0-907969-22-4.
  3. ^ a b Match report at fa-cupfinals.co.uk
  4. ^ a b Sporting Chronicle - 1902 FA Cup Final
  5. ^ "FA Cup Final kits, 1900-1909". Archived from the original on 25 September 2008. Retrieved 1 December 2008.

External links

1901–02 FA Cup

The FA Cup 1901–02 was the thirty-first staging of the world's oldest association football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup (more usually known as the FA Cup). Sheffield United won the competition for the second time, beating Southampton 2–1 in the replay of the final at Crystal Palace. The first match had finished 1–1.

Matches were scheduled to be played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If the replayed match was drawn further replays would be held at neutral venues until a winner was determined. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

Albert Brown (footballer, born 1879)

Albert Frederick Brown (1 April 1879 – 6 April 1955) was an English professional footballer who scored a goal in the 1902 FA Cup Final for Southampton, and also scored a record seven goals in one match.

Alf Common

Alfred Common (25 May 1880 in Millfield – 3 April 1946 in Darlington) was an English footballer who played at inside forward or centre forward. He is most famous for being the first player to be transferred for a fee of £1,000 on his transfer to Middlesbrough from Sunderland in 1905.

Bernard Wilkinson

Bernard Wilkinson (né Pickles; 12 March 1878 – 28 May 1949) was a professional footballer who won the 1902 FA Cup final with Sheffield United.

Bert Lee (footballer)

Ernest Albert Lee (19 August 1879 – 14 January 1958) was an English professional footballer who played in the 1902 FA Cup final for Southampton, and also made one appearance for England in 1904. He also played for Dundee, winning the Scottish Cup in 1910.

Bert Lipsham

Herbert Broughall Lipsham (29 April 1878 – 23 March 1932) was a professional footballer who won the 1902 FA Cup Final with Sheffield United.

Billy Barnes (footballer)

Billy Barnes (20 May 1879 – 1962) was a professional footballer from West Ham, Essex. Originally debuting for Thames Ironworks, he moved to Sheffield United and scored the winning goal in the 1902 FA Cup final replay. Later on in his career he won two Southern Football League titles and took part in two Charity Shield matches including the first time it was held. Once his playing career was over, he went on to manage Athletic Bilbao in Spain.

Dresden United F.C.

Dresden United Football Club was a football club based in the Dresden area of Stoke-on-Trent who were active at the end of the nineteenth century.

Fred Kirkham (football manager)

Frederick Thomas Kirkham (died 1949) was an English domestic and international football referee, and briefly the football manager for Tottenham Hotspur between 1907 and 1908.

George Molyneux

George Molyneux (24 July 1875 – 14 April 1942) was a professional footballer who played for Everton, Southampton and Southend United, and later became Southend's manager.

He played in the 1902 FA Cup Final for Southampton, and won four England caps.

Harry Johnson (footballer, born 1876)

William Harrison Johnson (4 January 1876 – 17 July 1940) was an English professional footballer.

Joe Turner (footballer)

Joseph Turner (March 1872 – 20 November 1950) was a professional footballer who played in the 1902 FA Cup final for Southampton. Southampton were a Southern League club at the time, and their feat was all the more remarkable in that they had already been losing finalists two years earlier. Turner missed the 1900 final and had also previously missed a crucial penalty when Southampton lost a semi final to Nottingham Forest in 1898.

John Fraser (footballer, born 1876)

John Fraser (10 November 1876 – 1 October 1952) was a Scottish professional footballer who was part of the Dundee team who won the Scottish Cup in 1910. Fraser had earlier played for Dumbarton, Motherwell, Notts County, Newcastle United, St Mirren and Southampton. He also represented both Scotland and the Scottish League XI. In addition, while with Dumbarton he earned a representative cap for Dumbartonshire against Glasgow in 1897. He later went on to coach Dundee and Chelsea.

List of people from Stoke-on-Trent

This is a list of notable people who were born in or near, or have been residents of the City of Stoke-on-Trent, England. Also listed are people who lived in the area before city status was granted in 1925.

The city was built on the pottery industry, and at the centre of that industry was the Wedgwood family, especially Josiah Wedgwood. Today he is credited with the industrialization of the manufacture of pottery, and is also remembered as a prominent opponent of slavery. Other giants of the pottery industry were Thomas Minton, William Moorcroft, and Josiah Spode.

Many notable residents of Stoke-on-Trent have gone on to achieve recognition in their own field. Legends of rock Slash and Lemmy spent portions of their childhood in the city, whilst Robbie Williams split from Take That to establish himself as a pop megastar in his own right. Local businessmen John Caudwell, Peter Coates, and John Madejski made large fortunes from founding Phones 4u, Bet365, and Auto Trader respectively. A new branch of Christianity in Primitive Methodism was formed from the endeavours of Hugh Bourne and William Clowes. In literature, Arnold Bennett was a prodigious novelist, and often drew on the local area for inspiration, particularly in his 1902 work Anna of the Five Towns. Another famous face is Captain Edward Smith, who went down with his ship, the Titanic, in 1912. In terms of military service, three recipients of the Victoria Cross were native to Stoke-on-Trent. R. J. Mitchell, inventor of the spitfire, also came from the city.

In sporting achievements, local clubs Port Vale and Stoke City have helped to develop the talents of local footballers, and in turn local names such as Roy Sproson, Freddie Steele, and Denis Smith have provided the club's with many years of loyal service. However the most famous player to be associated with the area is Stanley Matthews – the only player to have been knighted while still playing, the Wizard of the Dribble was the inaugural winner of the Ballon d'Or. He played for Stoke and later managed Port Vale. Outside of football, the most significant individual sportsman to hail from the city is Phil Taylor, sixteen-time winner of the World Professional Darts Championship.

Sport in Sheffield

Sheffield has a long history of involvement in sport. Although cricket was the first organised sport, it has gradually been supplanted by football. Both the main two local football teams grew out of cricket teams. Sheffield can claim many firsts in football the most famous one being Sheffield F.C. being the world's first and oldest football club. Today it has a club in every major team sport in England. Sheffield became the first UK National City of Sport in 1995 and is now home to the English Institute of Sport (EIS).

Today the city is home to two league clubs Sheffield Wednesday and Sheffield United, top flight ice hockey (Sheffield Steelers) and basketball (Sheffield Sharks) and a Premier League speedway team (Sheffield Tigers). Sheffield Eagles is the main rugby league club and operates a level below the Super League.

There are six boxing world champions from Sheffield, Clinton Woods and Johnny Nelson. David Sherwood is a top ten British tennis player from the city and the former England cricket captain, Michael Vaughan, was brought up and lives in Sheffield. Joe Simpson, a famous climber also comes from the city.

The largest stadium is Hillsborough Stadium, the home of Sheffield Wednesday, which holds around 39,850. The now-demolished Don Valley Stadium was formerly the largest athletics stadium in the United Kingdom. Bramall Lane is the world's oldest major football ground and holds around 33,000 and Sandygate Road, home to Hallam F.C., is the oldest football ground. The World Snooker Championships has been held at the Crucible Theatre since 1977.

Tom Kirkham

Thomas Kirkham was the referee of the 1902 FA Cup Final.At the end of the first match in the 1902 Cup Final between Sheffield United and Southampton, United's goalkeeper William Foulke, unhappy with one of his decisions, left his dressing room unclothed and pursued Kirkham, who took refuge in a broom cupboard. Foulke had to be stopped by a group of FA officials from wrenching the cupboard door from its hinges to reach the referee.Kirkham also refereed the replay, which Sheffield United won 2–1.

He also refereed the international match between Scotland and Ireland on 21 March 1903, followed by the matches between Scotland and Wales on 12 March 1904 and between Scotland and Ireland on 18 March 1905.He is often confused with Fred Kirkham (from Preston) who refereed the 1906 FA Cup Final.

Tommy Bowman

Thomas Bowman (26 October 1873 in Tarbolton – 27 August 1958 in Southampton) was a Scottish professional footballer who played as a half back in the 1902 FA Cup final for Southampton.

Walter Triggs

Walter Henry Triggs (born 1880) was an English professional footballer who made two appearances for Southampton in the Southern League in 1902, playing at left-back.

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