1901 FA Cup Final

The 1901 FA Cup Final was played at Crystal Palace between Tottenham Hotspur and Sheffield United—and the first FA Cup Final to be filmed by Pathé News.[1] As the match ended in a 2–2 tie, a new match had to be played seven days after, with the Spurs winning 3–1.

The win was the first in a trend (which continued throughout much of the twentieth century) of Tottenham winning major trophies in years ending in "1". Tottenham Hotspur remain the only non-League club to win the trophy after the advent of the Football League in 1888.

1901 FA Cup Final
Tottenham hotspur 1901 team
Tottenham Hotspur, winning team
Event1900–01 FA Cup
Tottenham Hotspur Sheffield United
Final
Tottenham Hotspur Sheffield United
2 2
Date20 April 1901
VenueCrystal Palace, London
RefereeArthur Kingscott
Attendance110,820
Replay
Tottenham Hotspur Sheffield United
3 1
Date27 April 1901
VenueBurnden Park, Bolton
RefereeArthur Kingscott
Attendance20,470

History

Match summary

110,820[2] supporters attended the match to see the two sides clash. Fred Priest opened the scoring for Sheffield United after about 20 minutes. Sandy Brown headed an equalising goal shortly afterwards and half time arrived with the score 1–1. Brown put Spurs ahead early in the second half, but, not to be denied, Sheffield United pressed strongly, and Walter Bennett headed an equaliser for the draw.

Replay

In the replay, Spurs became the last non-league side to win the FA Cup when they beat Sheffield United 3–1 before an attendance of 20,470 at Burnden Park, Bolton. John Cameron opened the scoring before centre forward Sandy Brown became the first player to score in every round. He netted both goals in the final as well as one in the replay for a total of 15 in the season's competition.

Match details

Final

Tottenham Hotspur2–2Sheffield United
Brown Goal 23'51' [3] Priest Goal 10'
Bennett Goal 52'
Tottenham Hotspur
Sheffield United[4]
George Clawley
Harry Erentz
Sandy Tait
Tom Morris
Ted Hughes
Jack L Jones (c)
Tom Smith
John Cameron
Sandy Brown
David Copeland
Jack Kirwan
Manager:
John Cameron
Willie Foulke
Harry Thickett
Peter Boyle
Harry Johnson
Tom Morren
Ernest Needham (c)
Walter Bennett
Charles "Oakey" Field
George Hedley
Fred Priest
Bert Lipsham
Club Secretary:
John Nicholson

Replay

Tottenham Hotspur3–1Sheffield United
Cameron Goal 52'
Smith Goal 76'
Brown Goal 87'
[3] Priest Goal 40'
Tottenham Hotspur
Sheffield United[4]
George Clawley
Harry Erentz
Sandy Tait
Tom Morris
Ted Hughes
Jack L Jones (c)
Tom Smith
John Cameron
Sandy Brown
David Copeland
Jack Kirwan
Manager:
John Cameron
Willie Foulke
Harry Thickett
Peter Boyle
Harry Johnson
Tom Morren
Ernest Needham (c)
Walter Bennett
Charles "Oakey" Field
George Hedley
Fred Priest
Bert Lipsham
Club Secretary:
John Nicholson

Match Rules

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary.
  • Replay if scores still level.
  • No substitutes

Gallery

Tottenham Hotspur FC 1901 Cup Winners

Tottenham Hotspur F.C.

Facupfinal1901-A

Crystal Palace

Sheffield United FC 1901 team

The Sheffield United team

Facupfinal1901-B

Crowd at Crystal Palace

Facupfinal1901-C

Replay at Burnden Park

Facupfinal1901-D

Tottenham score in the replay

1901 FA Cup Final2

Sheffield United F.C.

  • Player's Cigarette Cards Association Cup Winners No 22.23

References

  1. ^ 1901 FA Cup Final Retrieved 11 June 2010
  2. ^ a b c "Sporting Chronicle - 1901 FA Cup Final". Archived from the original on 28 October 2008. Retrieved 13 April 2007.
  3. ^ a b Match report at fa-cupfinals.co.uk Archived 27 December 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ a b "FA Cup Final kits, 1900-1909". Archived from the original on 25 September 2008. Retrieved 2 December 2008.

External links

1900–01 FA Cup

The 1900–01 FA Cup was the 30th season of the world's oldest association football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup (more usually known as the FA Cup). The cup was won by Tottenham Hotspur of the Southern League, who defeated Sheffield United 3–1 in a replay after a 2–2 draw in the first game. This was the only occasion since the formation of The Football League in 1888 that a club from outside the League won the cup.Matches were scheduled to be played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If the replayed match was drawn further replays would be held at neutral venues until a winner was determined. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

Arthur Kingscott

Arthur Kingscott (21 Jan 1864 – 19 June 1937) was a footballing personality from Derbyshire at the turn of the 20th century. He was from New Sawley, Long Eaton in Derbyshire England, later serving as a treasurer at the Football Association. There is an unconfirmed report in Caxton's 'Association Football' (1960) that Kingscott played a hand in the discovery of Steve Bloomer before his first game with Derby County.

Burnden Park

Burnden Park was the home of English football club Bolton Wanderers who played home games there between 1895 and 1997. As well as hosting the 1901 FA Cup Final replay, it was the scene in 1946 of one of the greatest disasters in English football, and the subject of an L. S. Lowry painting. It was demolished in 1999, two years after Bolton moved to their new home at the Reebok Stadium.

Croydon Common F.C.

Croydon Common Football Club was an amateur and, later on, professional football club based in Croydon.

Crystal Palace Park

Crystal Palace Park is a Victorian pleasure ground, used for cultural and sporting events. It is located in the south-east London suburb of Crystal Palace, which was in turn named after the Crystal Palace Exhibition building, which had been moved from Hyde Park, London after the 1851 Great Exhibition and rebuilt with some modifications and enlargements to form the centrepiece of the pleasure ground, before being destroyed by fire in 1936. The park features full-scale models of dinosaurs in a landscape, a maze, lakes, and a concert bowl.This site contains the National Sports Centre, previously a football stadium that hosted the FA Cup Final from 1895 to 1914 as well as Crystal Palace F.C.'s matches from their formation in 1905 until the club was forced to relocate during the First World War. The London County Cricket Club also played matches at Crystal Palace Park Cricket Ground from 1900 to 1908, when they folded, and the cricket ground staged a number of other first-class cricket matches and had first been used by Kent County Cricket Club as a first-class venue in 1864.

The park is situated halfway along the Norwood Ridge at one of its highest points. This ridge offers views northward to central London, eastward to the Queen Elizabeth II Bridge and Greenwich, and southward to Croydon and the North Downs. The park remains a major London public park. The park was maintained by the LCC and later the GLC, but with the abolition of the GLC in 1986, control of the park was given to the London Borough of Bromley, so the park is now entirely within the London Borough of Bromley.

The park is Grade II* listed on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.

David Copeland (footballer)

David Copeland (2 April 1875 – 1931) was a professional footballer who played for Ayr Parkhouse, Walsall Town Swifts, Bedminster, Tottenham Hotspur, Chelsea and Glossop North End.

Fred Priest

Alfred Ernest Priest (24 July 1875 – 5 May 1922) was a professional footballer from the North East of England who won the 1899 and 1902 FA Cup finals with Sheffield United.

George Clawley

George Clawley (10 April 1875 – 16 July 1920) was an English professional goalkeeper who played for Stoke, Southampton and Tottenham Hotspur in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He was the goalkeeper for the Spurs side that won the 1901 FA Cup Final.

Harry Erentz

Henry Bernt "Harry" Erentz (17 September 1874 – 19 July 1947) was a Scottish footballer who played at right back for various clubs in both Scotland and England.

Jack Jones (footballer, born 1869)

John Leonard "Jack" Jones (1869 – 24 November 1931) was a Welsh professional footballer and amateur cricketer. He played football for Bootle, Stockton, Grimsby Town, Sheffield United, Tottenham Hotspur, Watford and Worcester City. Jones also played cricket for Stockton Cricket Club and Sheffield United Cricket Club. Born in Rhuddlan, he represented Wales on 21 occasions.

Non-League football

Non-League football describes football leagues played outside the top leagues of a country. Usually it describes leagues which are not fully professional. The term is primarily used for football in England, where it describes football played at a level below that of the Premier League (20 clubs) and the three divisions of the English Football League (EFL; 72 clubs). The term non-League was commonly used well before 1992 when the top football clubs in England all belonged to The Football League (from 2016, the EFL); all clubs who were not a part of The Football League were therefore 'non-League' clubs. The term can be confusing as the vast majority of non-league football clubs in England play in a type of league. Currently, a non-League team would be any club playing in the National League and below and therefore would not play in the EFL Cup.

Oakey Field

Charles William Frederick Field (11 December 1878 – 29 October 1949), known as Oakey Field, was an English professional footballer who played as an inside left or outside left for Sheffield United and Small Heath (later renamed Birmingham) in the Football League.

Peter Boyle (footballer, born 1876)

Peter Boyle (26 April 1876 – 24 June 1939) was an Irish footballer and manager. Born in Carlingford in Ireland Boyle was a left back whose most successful playing spell was with Sheffield United with whom he reached the FA Cup Final on three occasions, playing on the winning side on two of them. He also played for Sunderland and Motherwell as well as representing Ireland on five occasions. He later had a brief spell as player-manager with York City in 1912.

Scholar Green

Scholar Green () is a village in the civil parish of Odd Rode, in Cheshire, England. Encompassing the smaller settlements of Kent Green and The Bank, it is near Mow Cop, Alsager, Rode Heath, Butt Lane and Kidsgrove and in the unitary authority area of Cheshire East.

Scholar Green has a long history, as shown by the number and range of listed buildings in and around the village. Little Moreton Hall, a Grade I listed moated timber-framed house, has stood in the village since the early 16th century. Other listed buildings include the 18th-century Rode Hall and All Saints Church, built between 1863 and 1864 and designed by George Gilbert Scott. The Macclesfield Canal runs through Scholar Green, and the Trent and Mersey Canal is nearby.

The population is served by three public houses: "The Rising Sun", "The Bleeding Wolf" and "The Traveller's Rest". The village is also served by All Saints Church, Scholar Green, by the Bank Methodist Church and by Scholar Green Primary School.

Ted Hughes (footballer)

Edward "Ted" Hughes (born 1876 in Ruabon, Denbighshire Wales) was a professional footballer who played for clubs including Everton, Tottenham Hotspur, Clyde and represented Wales on 14 occasions.

Tom Smith (footballer, born 1876)

Tom Smith (26 November 1876 – 1937) was a professional footballer who played for Preston North End, Tottenham Hotspur and Carlisle United.Tom Smith's Tottenham Hotspur 1901 FA Cup Winning Medal is up for Auction on 26 October 2015 at Graham Budd Auctions, London.

Tom Smith (footballer, born 1877)

Thomas Smith (born 1877) was a professional English footballer who played at outside-right for various clubs around the turn of the 20th century.

William Foulke (footballer)

William Henry "Fatty" Foulke (12 April 1874 – 1 May 1916; sometimes spelled Foulk, Foulkes) was a professional cricketer and football player in England in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Foulke was renowned for his great size (6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) by some estimates) and weight, reaching perhaps 24 stone (152 kg; 336 lb) at the end of his career, although reports on his weight vary.

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