1875 FA Cup Final

The 1875 FA Cup Final was won by Royal Engineers after a replay at The Oval, London. The runners-up were the Old Etonians.

1875 FA Cup Final
Event1874–75 FA Cup
Royal Engineers Old Etonians
1 1
Date13 March 1875
VenueKennington Oval, London
RefereeCharles Alcock
Attendance2,000
1875 FA Cup Final Replay
Event1874–75 FA Cup
Royal Engineers Old Etonians
2 0
Date16 March 1875
VenueKennington Oval, London
RefereeCharles Alcock
Attendance3,000

Tournament layout

There were 29 entrants in the 1874–75 FA Cup, one more than the previous year. One team got a bye in the first round, meaning that the second round consisted of 15 teams. The Old Etonians received a bye in the second round, therefore the quarter-finals had the standard eight teams.

Route to the Final

The Engineers, who lost the final on two of the three previous occasions, kicked off with a resounding 3–0 win over Marlow. They kept the scoring feat up in the next round, beating Cambridge University 5–0. The Quarter Final was a closely fought match against Clapham Rovers, just prevailing 3–2. The Semi-final produced a repeat fixture of the final of 1874, as the Engineers faced Oxford University. This time, the Engineers won 1–0.

The Old Etonians started off against the Swifts, which proved a very tough match. After two drawn games, the Etonians managed to pull off a 3–0 victory. In the second round they received a bye which led them into the quarter-finals. Following a win against Maidenhead, they played Shropshire Wanderers. An extremely close match was just edged out by a single goal to nil.

Final matches

Royal engineers 1875
Royal Engineers, 1875 winning team

The first match was notable chiefly because it was played in a "howling gale". The conditions considerably favoured the Etonians team, which had the wind at its backs for all but 10 minutes of the 90, and all 30 minutes of extra time (teams in this period changed ends after every goal- this game was the last to feature this rule).[1] Cuthbert Ottaway received a severe hack on his ankle 37 minutes into the final and was forced to leave the field; in his absence, the Old Boys were regarded as fortunate to have held on for a 1–1 draw.

Ottaway failed to recover in time for the replay, held only three days later, and Etonians also lost the services of three other players who had prior commitments. Unable to obtain adequate replacements, the Old Boys arrived at the ground an hour late and lost the delayed replay 0–2.

Henry Renny-Tailyour scored in both matches for the Engineers.

Final

Royal Engineers1–1Old Etonians
Renny-Tailyour Goal Report Bonsor Goal
GK Capt William Merriman
DF Lieut George H. Sim
DF Lieut Gerald Onslow
DF Lieut Richard Ruck
FW Lieut Pelham von Donop
FW Lieut Charles Wood
FW Lieut Herbert Rawson
FW Lieut William Stafford
FW Capt Henry Renny-Tailyour
FW Lieut Alexander Mein
FW Lieut Cecil Wingfield-Stratford
GK Charles Farmer
DF Francis Wilson
DF Albert Thompson
DF Edgar Lubbock
FW Robert Benson
FW William Kenyon-Slaney
FW Frederick Patton
FW Alexander Bonsor
FW Cuthbert Ottaway
FW Hon Arthur Kinnaird
FW Sir James Stronge

Replay

Royal Engineers2–0Old Etonians
Stafford Goal
Renny-Tailyour Goal
Royal Engineers
Old
Etonians
GK Capt William Merriman
DF Lieut George Sim
DF Lieut Gerald Onslow
DF Lieut Richard Ruck
FW Lieut Pelham von Donop
FW Lieut Charles Wood
FW Lieut Herbert Rawson
FW Lieut William Stafford
FW Capt Henry Renny-Tailyour
FW Lieut Cecil Wingfield-Stratford
FW Lieut Alexander Mein
GK Capt Edward Drummond-Moray
DF Matthew Farrer
DF Edgar Lubbock
DF Francis Wilson
FW Thomas Hamond
FW Alfred Lubbock
FW Frederick Patton
FW Alexander Bonsor
FW Charles Farmer
FW Hon Arthur Kinnaird
FW Sir James Stronge

References

  1. ^ Motson, John, "Motson's FA Cup Odyssey: The World's Greatest Knockout Competition”, Robson Publishing, 2005

External links

1874–75 FA Cup

The 1874–75 FA Cup was the fourth season of England's oldest football tournament, the Football Association Challenge Cup or "FA Cup". 29 teams entered, one more than the previous season, although four of the 29 never played a match. The final was contested by Royal Engineers – playing in their third final in the four seasons of the FA Cup – and Old Etonians – playing in their first final. On their way to the final, Royal Engineers knocked out Cambridge University in the Second Round and holders Oxford University in the Semi-finals, while Old Etonians only managed to score more than one goal in one match: their second replay against Swifts, which they won 3–0. The biggest win of the competition was recorded by two-time FA Cup winners Wanderers, who beat Farningham 16–0 in the First Round.

In the final, played on 13 March 1875, Old Etonians forced a replay against Royal Engineers, with the two sides playing out a 1–1 draw. The replay was played three days later, when goals from Henry Renny-Tailyour and William Stafford secured a 2–0 win for Royal Engineers.

Alfred Goodwyn

Alfred George Goodwyn (13 March 1850 – 14 March 1874) was an English Royal Engineer, who represented his regiment at football. He was a member of the Regiment's team that was defeated in the very first FA Cup final. He also represented England in the second international football match against Scotland in 1873.

Alfred Lubbock

Alfred Lubbock (31 October 1845 – 17 July 1916) was an English amateur cricketer who played first-class cricket for a variety of side including Kent County Cricket Club and the Marylebone Cricket Club between 1863 and 1875. He was considered to be one of the best batsman of his era, comparable to WG Grace, and also played association football, playing for Old Etonians in the 1875 FA Cup Final.

Cecil Wingfield-Stratford

Brigadier-General Cecil Vernon Wingfield-Stratford CB, CMG (7 October 1853 – 5 February 1939) was a British Army officer in the Royal Engineers and an English international footballer, who played as a Forward.

Edmond Cotter

Col. Edmond William Cotter (12 February 1852 – 23 August 1934) was a British soldier, who played for the Royal Engineers in the 1872 FA Cup Final. As a soldier, he was engaged in four military campaigns: the Ashanti campaign of 1873–74, the Zhob Valley Expedition of 1884, the Nile Expedition of 1884–85 and the Burma Expedition of 1887–88. At the end of his career, he was briefly involved with the United Irish movement.

Great Lines Heritage Park

The Great Lines Heritage Park is a complex network of open spaces connecting Chatham, Gillingham, Brompton and the Historic Dockyard. The long military history of the towns has dominated the history of the site and the park. The Great Lines Heritage Park, consists of Fort Amherst, Chatham Lines, the Field of Fire (later known as the Great Lines), Inner Lines, Medway Park (sports centre) together with the Lower Lines.

The Lines, were constructed in Napoleonic times. They were never used (during the wars) but they have been used to be a barrier to development, keeping the fort and the Lines mostly untouched.

Most of the park is accessible to all at most times.

It has many pedestrian and cycle links for residents of the two towns of Gillingham and Chatham.

Herbert Muirhead

Col. Herbert Hugh Muirhead (10 December 1850 – 4 March 1904) was a British soldier, who played for the Royal Engineers in the 1872 FA Cup Final.

Herbert Rawson

Colonel Herbert Edward Rawson CB (3 September 1852 – 18 October 1924) was an English British Army officer and footballer who played once (as a forward) for England, and appeared in two FA Cup finals, winning the cup in 1875 as a member of the Royal Engineers.

John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury

John Lubbock, 1st Baron Avebury, 4th Baronet, (30 April 1834 – 28 May 1913), known as Sir John Lubbock, 4th Baronet from 1865 until 1900, was an English banker, Liberal politician, philanthropist, scientist and polymath. Lubbock worked in his family company as a banker but made significant contributions in archaeology, ethnography, and several branches of biology. He coined the terms "Paleolithic" and "Neolithic" to denote the Old and New Stone Ages, respectively. He helped establish archaeology as a scientific discipline, and was also influential in nineteenth-century debates concerning evolutionary theory. He introduced the first law for the protection of the UK's archaeological and architectural heritage. He was also a founding member of the X Club.

Mein

Mein may refer to:

Mein clan, an ethnic group living along the Forcados River in Delta State, Nigeria

Mein (noodles), a variety of Chinese noodles made from wheat

Mein (song), a song by the band Deftones, featuring System of a Down singer Serj Tankian

Écoust-Saint-Mein, a commune in the Pas-de-Calais department in FrancePeople with surname Mein:

Alexander Mein (1854–1927), British soldier who played on the winning side in the 1875 FA Cup Final

Hannie Mein (1933-2003), Dutch ceramist.

John Gordon Mein (1913-1968), a United States ambassador to Guatemala, the first to be assassinated while in service

Will G. Mein (1866 -1939), a British book illustrator who flourished in the late 19th to early 20th centurySee also

William Mein Smith, (1799-1869), a key actor in the early settlement of New Zealand's capital city, Wellington

P. G. von Donop

Lieutenant-Colonel Pelham George von Donop (28 April 1851 – 7 November 1921) was a British Army officer in the Royal Engineers and later Chief Inspecting Officer of Railways. He represented the Royal Engineers at association football, appearing in two FA Cup Finals, and also made two appearances for the England national football team.

He was the godfather of the writer Sir P. G. Wodehouse, who was named Pelham in his honour.

Sir John Lubbock, 3rd Baronet

Sir John William Lubbock, 3rd Baronet FRS (26 March 1803 – 21 June 1865) was an English banker, barrister, mathematician and astronomer.

Seasons
Qualifying rounds
Finals

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