175th meridian west

The meridian 175° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Asia, the Pacific Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 175th meridian west forms a great circle with the 5th meridian east.

Line across the Earth
175°
175th meridian west

From Pole to Pole

Starting at the North Pole and heading south to the South Pole, the 175th meridian west passes through:

Co-ordinates Country, territory or sea Notes
90°0′N 175°0′W / 90.000°N 175.000°W Arctic Ocean
71°46′N 175°0′W / 71.767°N 175.000°W Chukchi Sea
67°27′N 175°0′W / 67.450°N 175.000°W  Russia Chukotka Autonomous OkrugChukchi Peninsula
64°47′N 175°0′W / 64.783°N 175.000°W Bering Sea Passing just east of Koniuji Island, Alaska,  United States (at 52°13′N 175°6′W / 52.217°N 175.100°W)
52°5′N 175°0′W / 52.083°N 175.000°W  United States AlaskaAtka Island
52°1′N 175°0′W / 52.017°N 175.000°W Pacific Ocean Passing just east of the island of Kao,  Tonga (at 19°39′S 175°1′W / 19.650°S 175.017°W)
Passing just east of the island of Tofua,  Tonga (at 19°45′S 175°2′W / 19.750°S 175.033°W)
21°2′S 175°0′W / 21.033°S 175.000°W  Tonga 'Ata Island
21°3′S 175°0′W / 21.050°S 175.000°W Pacific Ocean Passing just east of the islands of Tongatapu,  Tonga (at 21°9′S 175°2′W / 21.150°S 175.033°W)
Passing just west of the island of ʻEua,  Tonga (at 21°23′S 174°58′W / 21.383°S 174.967°W)
60°0′S 175°0′W / 60.000°S 175.000°W Southern Ocean
78°27′S 175°0′W / 78.450°S 175.000°W Antarctica Ross Dependency, claimed by  New Zealand

See also

174th meridian west

The meridian 174° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Asia, the Pacific Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 174th meridian west forms a great circle with the 6th meridian east.

175th meridian

175th meridian may refer to:

175th meridian east, a line of longitude east of the Greenwich Meridian

175th meridian west, a line of longitude west of the Greenwich Meridian

176th meridian west

The meridian 176° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Asia, the Pacific Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 176th meridian west forms a great circle with the 4th meridian east.

5th meridian east

The meridian 5° east of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Europe, Africa, the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 5th meridian east forms a great circle with the 175th meridian west.

Beyond Thirty

Beyond Thirty is a short science fiction novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs. It was written in 1915 and first published in All Around Magazine in February 1916, but did not appear in book form in Burroughs' lifetime. The first book edition was issued by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach's Fantasy Press fanzine in 1955; it then appeared in the collection Beyond Thirty and The Man-Eater, published by Science-Fiction & Fantasy Publications in 1957. The work was retitled The Lost Continent for the first mass-market paperback edition, published by Ace Books in October 1963; all subsequent editions bore the new title until the Bison Books edition of March 2001, which restored the original title.

Cyclone Bebe

Severe Tropical Cyclone Bebe, also known as Hurricane Bebe, was a pre-season storm in the South Pacific Ocean that impacted Fiji, the Ellice Islands (now Tuvalu) and the Gilbert Islands (now Kiribati) during October 1972.

Tropical upper tropospheric trough

A tropical upper tropospheric trough (TUTT), also known as the mid-oceanic trough,or commonly called as Western Hemisphere or "upper cold low" is a trough situated in upper-level (at about 200 hPa) tropics. Its formation is usually caused by the intrusion of energy and wind from the mid-latitudes into the tropics. It can also develop from the inverted trough adjacent to an upper level anticyclone. TUTTs are different from mid-latitude troughs in the sense that they are maintained by subsidence warming near the tropopause which balances radiational cooling. When strong, they can present a significant vertical wind shear to the tropics and subdue tropical cyclogenesis. When upper cold lows break off from their base, they tend to retrograde and force the development, or enhance, surface troughs and tropical waves to their east. Under special circumstances, they can induce thunderstorm activity and lead to the formation of tropical cyclones.

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