1739

1739 (MDCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1739th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 739th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 18th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1739, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1739 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1739
MDCCXXXIX
Ab urbe condita2492
Armenian calendar1188
ԹՎ ՌՃՁԸ
Assyrian calendar6489
Balinese saka calendar1660–1661
Bengali calendar1146
Berber calendar2689
British Regnal year12 Geo. 2 – 13 Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar2283
Burmese calendar1101
Byzantine calendar7247–7248
Chinese calendar戊午(Earth Horse)
4435 or 4375
    — to —
己未年 (Earth Goat)
4436 or 4376
Coptic calendar1455–1456
Discordian calendar2905
Ethiopian calendar1731–1732
Hebrew calendar5499–5500
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1795–1796
 - Shaka Samvat1660–1661
 - Kali Yuga4839–4840
Holocene calendar11739
Igbo calendar739–740
Iranian calendar1117–1118
Islamic calendar1151–1152
Japanese calendarGenbun 4
(元文4年)
Javanese calendar1663–1664
Julian calendarGregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar4072
Minguo calendar173 before ROC
民前173年
Nanakshahi calendar271
Thai solar calendar2281–2282
Tibetan calendar阳土马年
(male Earth-Horse)
1865 or 1484 or 712
    — to —
阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1866 or 1485 or 713

Events

January–June

July–December

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ "History of The New Room". Bristol: The New Room. Archived from the original on August 17, 2013. Retrieved July 17, 2011.
  2. ^ "History". Kungl. Vetenskapsakademien. Retrieved 2011-09-27.
1730s

The 1730s decade ran from January 1, 1730, to December 31, 1739.

1739 English cricket season

The 1739 English cricket season was the 43rd cricket season since the earliest recorded eleven-aside match was played. Details have survived of seven matches.

The season was the first time that a Rest of England side played, formed specifically to take on Kent which appears to have had the game's strongest county team.

1739 in Canada

Events from the year 1739 in Canada.

1739 in Denmark

Events from the year 1739 in Denmark.

1739 in France

Events from the year 1739 in France.

1739 in India

Events in the year 1739 in India.

1739 in Ireland

Events from the year 1739 in Ireland.

1739 in Russia

Events from the year 1739 in Russia

1739 in Scotland

Events from the year 1739 in Scotland.

1739 in Sweden

Events from the year 1739 in Sweden

Bertie County, North Carolina

Bertie County is a county located in the northeast area of the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2015 census, the population was 20,199. Its county seat is Windsor. The county was created in 1722 as Bertie Precinct and gained county status in 1739.The Sans Souci Ferry, providing access across the Cashie River is the county's only ferry.

Dick Turpin

Richard Turpin (bapt. 21 September 1705 – 7 April 1739) was an English highwayman whose exploits were romanticised following his execution in York for horse theft. Turpin may have followed his father's trade as a butcher early in his life but, by the early 1730s, he had joined a gang of deer thieves and, later, became a poacher, burglar, horse thief and killer. He is also known for a fictional 200-mile (320 km) overnight ride from London to York on his horse Black Bess, a story that was made famous by the Victorian novelist William Harrison Ainsworth almost 100 years after Turpin's death.

Turpin's involvement in the crime with which he is most closely associated—highway robbery—followed the arrest of the other members of his gang in 1735. He then disappeared from public view towards the end of that year, only to resurface in 1737 with two new accomplices, one of whom he may have accidentally shot and killed. Turpin fled from the scene and shortly afterwards killed a man who attempted his capture. Later that year, he moved to Yorkshire and assumed the alias of John Palmer. While he was staying at an inn, local magistrates became suspicious of "Palmer" and made enquiries as to how he funded his lifestyle. Suspected of being a horse thief, "Palmer" was imprisoned in York Castle, to be tried at the next assizes. Turpin's true identity was revealed by a letter he wrote to his brother-in-law from his prison cell, which fell into the hands of the authorities. On 22 March 1739, Turpin was found guilty on two charges of horse theft and sentenced to death; he was executed on 7 April 1739.

Turpin became the subject of legend after his execution, romanticised as dashing and heroic in English ballads and popular theatre of the 18th and 19th centuries and in film and television of the 20th century.

Jalan FELDA Kemahang

Jalan FELDA Kemahang, Federal Route 1739, is a federal road in Kelantan, Malaysia.

At most sections, the Federal Route 1739 was built under the JKR R5 road standard, allowing maximum speed limit of up to 90 km/h.

List of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain, 1720–1739

This is an incomplete list of Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain for the years 1720–1739. For Acts passed up until 1707 see List of Acts of the Parliament of England and List of Acts of the Parliament of Scotland. See also the List of Acts of the Parliament of Ireland to 1700 and the List of Acts of the Parliament of Ireland, 1701–1800.

For Acts passed from 1801 onwards see List of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. For Acts of the devolved parliaments and assemblies in the United Kingdom, see the List of Acts of the Scottish Parliament from 1999, the List of Acts of the Northern Ireland Assembly, and the List of Acts and Measures of the National Assembly for Wales; see also the List of Acts of the Parliament of Northern Ireland.

The number shown after each Act's title is its chapter number. Acts are cited using this number, preceded by the year(s) of the reign during which the relevant parliamentary session was held; thus the Union with Ireland Act 1800 is cited as "39 & 40 Geo. 3 c. 67", meaning the 67th Act passed during the session that started in the 39th year of the reign of George III and which finished in the 40th year of that reign. Note that the modern convention is to use Arabic numerals in citations (thus "41 Geo. 3" rather than "41 Geo. III"). Note also that Acts of the last session of the Parliament of Great Britain and the first session of the Parliament of the United Kingdom are both cited as "41 Geo. 3".

Acts passed by the Parliament of Great Britain did not have a short title; however, some of these Acts have subsequently been given a short title by Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (such as the Short Titles Act 1896).

Before the Acts of Parliament (Commencement) Act 1793 came into force on 8 April 1793, Acts passed by the Parliament of Great Britain were deemed to have come into effect on the first day of the session in which they were passed. Because of this, the years given in the list below may in fact be the year before a particular Act was passed.

Nahar Singh Mahal

Nahar Singh Mahal is located at Ballabhgarh in Faridabad district of Haryana. This fort was built by the forefathers of Jat Raja Nahar Singh around 1739 AD, and after whom Ballabgarh was named, the construction however continued in parts till about 1850. The fort is also known as Raja Nahar Singh Palace.

New Kingdom of Granada

The New Kingdom of Granada (Spanish: Nuevo Reino de Granada), or Kingdom of the New Granada, was the name given to a group of 16th-century Spanish colonial provinces in northern South America governed by the president of the Audiencia of Santa Fe, an area corresponding mainly to modern-day Colombia, Panama and Venezuela. The conquistadors originally organized it as a captaincy general within the Viceroyalty of Peru. The crown established the audiencia in 1549. Ultimately the kingdom became part of the Viceroyalty of New Granada first in 1717 and permanently in 1739. After several attempts to set up independent states in the 1810s, the kingdom and the viceroyalty ceased to exist altogether in 1819 with the establishment of Gran Colombia.

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences or Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien is one of the royal academies of Sweden. It is an independent, non-governmental scientific organisation which takes special responsibility for the natural sciences and mathematics, but endeavours to promote the exchange of ideas between various disciplines.

Its purpose is to;

Att främja vetenskaperna och stärka deras inflytande i samhället(To promote the sciences and strengthen their influence in society)Every year the academy awards the Nobel Prizes in Physics and in Chemistry, the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, the Crafoord Prize, the Sjöberg Prize and several other prizes.

Russo-Turkish War (1735–1739)

The Russo-Turkish War of 1735–1739 between Russia and the Ottoman Empire was caused by the Ottoman Empire's war with Persia and continuing raids by the Crimean Tatars. The war also represented Russia's continuing struggle for access to the Black Sea. In 1737, Austria joined the war on Russia's side, known in historiography as the Austro-Turkish War of 1737–1739.

War of Jenkins' Ear

The War of Jenkins' Ear (known as Guerra del Asiento in Spain) was a conflict between Britain and Spain lasting from 1739 to 1748, with major operations largely ended by 1742. Its unusual name, coined by Thomas Carlyle in 1858, refers to an ear severed from Robert Jenkins, a captain of a British merchant ship. There is no evidence that supports the stories that the severed ear was exhibited before the British Parliament.

The seeds of conflict began with the separation of an ear from Jenkins following the boarding of his vessel by Spanish coast guards in 1731, eight years before the war began. Popular response to the incident was tepid until several years later when opposition politicians and the British South Sea Company hoped to spur outrage against Spain, believing that a victorious war would improve Britain’s trading opportunities in the Caribbean. Also ostensibly providing the impetus to war against the Spanish Empire was a desire to pressure the Spanish not to renege on the lucrative asiento contract, which gave British slavers permission to sell slaves in Spanish America.The war resulted in heavy British casualties in North America. After 1742, the war was subsumed by the wider War of the Austrian Succession, which involved most of the powers of Europe. Peace arrived with the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748. From the British perspective, the war was notable because it was the first time that a regiment of colonial American troops (Oglethorpe's Regiment) was raised and placed "on the Establishment" – made a part of the regular British Army – and sent to fight outside North America.

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