1727

1727 (MDCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1727th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 727th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1727, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1727 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1727
MDCCXXVII
Ab urbe condita2480
Armenian calendar1176
ԹՎ ՌՃՀԶ
Assyrian calendar6477
Balinese saka calendar1648–1649
Bengali calendar1134
Berber calendar2677
British Regnal year13 Geo. 1 – 1 Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar2271
Burmese calendar1089
Byzantine calendar7235–7236
Chinese calendar丙午(Fire Horse)
4423 or 4363
    — to —
丁未年 (Fire Goat)
4424 or 4364
Coptic calendar1443–1444
Discordian calendar2893
Ethiopian calendar1719–1720
Hebrew calendar5487–5488
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1783–1784
 - Shaka Samvat1648–1649
 - Kali Yuga4827–4828
Holocene calendar11727
Igbo calendar727–728
Iranian calendar1105–1106
Islamic calendar1139–1140
Japanese calendarKyōhō 12
(享保12年)
Javanese calendar1651–1652
Julian calendarGregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar4060
Minguo calendar185 before ROC
民前185年
Nanakshahi calendar259
Thai solar calendar2269–2270
Tibetan calendar阳火马年
(male Fire-Horse)
1853 or 1472 or 700
    — to —
阴火羊年
(female Fire-Goat)
1854 or 1473 or 701

Events

January–June

July–December

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ a b c Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 301. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  2. ^ a b Everett, Jason M., ed. (2006). "1727". The People's Chronology. Thomson Gale.
  3. ^ "Dornoch in the 18th century". Historylinks Museum. Retrieved 2010-08-27.
  4. ^ K. M. Sheard (8 December 2011). Llewellyn's Complete Book of Names: For Pagans, Wiccans, Druids, Heathens, Mages, Shamans & Independent Thinkers of All Sorts Who Are Curious about Na. Llewellyn Worldwide. pp. 304–. ISBN 978-0-7387-2368-6. Retrieved 28 June 2012.
  5. ^ Neill, W. N. (1923). "the Last Execution for Witchcraft in Scotland, 1722". Scottish Historical Review. 20: 218–21. JSTOR 25519547.
  6. ^ Schiavone, Michael J. (2009). Dictionary of Maltese Biographies Vol. 1 A–F. Pietà: Pubblikazzjonijiet Indipendenza. p. 755. ISBN 9789993291329.
  7. ^ Schiavone, Michael J. (2009). Dictionary of Maltese Biographies Vol. 1 A–F. Pietà: Pubblikazzjonijiet Indipendenza. p. 756. ISBN 9789993291329.
1727 British general election

The 1727 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time, it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham, and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs, led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

1727 English cricket season

1727 was the 31st English cricket season since the earliest recorded eleven-aside match was played. It is the first season in which matches are known to have been played in accordance with agreed, written rules. Details have survived of four matches.

1727 in Canada

Events from the year 1727 in Canada.

1727 in Denmark

Events from the year 1727 in Denmark.

1727 in France

Events from the year 1727 in France.

1727 in Ireland

Events from the year 1727 in Ireland.

1727 in Norway

Events in the year 1727 in Norway.

1727 in Russia

Events from the year 1727 in Russia

1727 in Scotland

Events from the year 1727 in Scotland.

1727 in Sweden

Events from the year 1727 in Sweden

George I of Great Britain

George I (George Louis; German: Georg Ludwig; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1 August 1714 and ruler of the Duchy and Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) in the Holy Roman Empire from 1698 until his death in 1727.

George was born in Hanover and inherited the titles and lands of the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg from his father and uncles. A succession of European wars expanded his German domains during his lifetime, and in 1708 he was ratified as prince-elector of Hanover. At the age of 54, after the death of his second cousin Anne, Queen of Great Britain, George ascended the British throne as the first monarch of the House of Hanover. Although over 50 Roman Catholics were closer to Anne by primogeniture, the Act of Settlement 1701 prohibited Catholics from inheriting the British throne; George was Anne's closest living Protestant relative. In reaction, Jacobites attempted to depose George and replace him with Anne's Catholic half-brother, James Francis Edward Stuart, but their attempts failed.

During George's reign, the powers of the monarchy diminished and Britain began a transition to the modern system of cabinet government led by a prime minister. Towards the end of his reign, actual political power was held by Robert Walpole, now recognised as Britain's first de facto prime minister. George died of a stroke on a trip to his native Hanover, where he was buried. He was the last British monarch to be buried outside the United Kingdom.

Isaac Newton

Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27) was an English mathematician, physicist, astronomer, theologian, and author (described in his own day as a "natural philosopher") who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time, and a key figure in the scientific revolution. His book Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica ("Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy"), first published in 1687, laid the foundations of classical mechanics. Newton also made seminal contributions to optics, and shares credit with Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz for developing the infinitesimal calculus.

In Principia, Newton formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation that formed the dominant scientific viewpoint until it was superseded by the theory of relativity. Newton used his mathematical description of gravity to prove Kepler's laws of planetary motion, account for tides, the trajectories of comets, the precession of the equinoxes and other phenomena, eradicating doubt about the Solar System's heliocentricity. He demonstrated that the motion of objects on Earth and celestial bodies could be accounted for by the same principles. Newton's inference that the Earth is an oblate spheroid was later confirmed by the geodetic measurements of Maupertuis, La Condamine, and others, convincing most European scientists of the superiority of Newtonian mechanics over earlier systems.

Newton built the first practical reflecting telescope and developed a sophisticated theory of colour based on the observation that a prism separates white light into the colours of the visible spectrum. His work on light was collected in his highly influential book Opticks, published in 1704. He also formulated an empirical law of cooling, made the first theoretical calculation of the speed of sound, and introduced the notion of a Newtonian fluid. In addition to his work on calculus, as a mathematician Newton contributed to the study of power series, generalised the binomial theorem to non-integer exponents, developed a method for approximating the roots of a function, and classified most of the cubic plane curves.

Newton was a fellow of Trinity College and the second Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He was a devout, but unorthodox, Christian who privately rejected the doctrine of the Trinity. Unusually for a member of the Cambridge faculty of the day, he refused to take holy orders in the Church of England. Beyond his work on the mathematical sciences, Newton dedicated much of his time to the study of alchemy and biblical chronology, but most of his work in those areas remained unpublished until long after his death. Politically and personally tied to the Whig party, Newton served two brief terms as Member of Parliament for the University of Cambridge, in 1689–90 and 1701–02. He was knighted by Queen Anne in 1705 and spent the last three decades of his life in London, serving as Warden (1696–1700) and Master (1700–1727) of the Royal Mint, as well as president of the Royal Society (1703–1727).

Jaipur

Jaipur ( (listen)) is the capital and the largest city of the Indian state of Rajasthan in Northern India. It was founded on 18 November 1727 by Jai Singh II, the ruler of Amer, and after whom the city is named. As of 2011, the city had a population of 3.1 million, making it the tenth most populous city in the country. Jaipur is also known as the Pink City, due to the dominant color scheme of its buildings. It is located 268 km (167 miles) from the national capital New Delhi. Jaipur is a popular tourist destination in India and forms a part of the west Golden Triangle tourist circuit along with Delhi and Agra (240 km, 149 mi). It also serves as a gateway to other tourist destinations in Rajasthan such as Jodhpur (348 km, 216 mi), Jaisalmer (571 km, 355 mi) Udaipur (421 km, 262 mi)

and Mount Abu

(520 km, 323 mi). Jaipur is located 614 km from simla.

Jaipur is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the Jantar Mantar and the Amer Fort.

LS-1727

LS-1727, also known as nandrolone 17β-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-nitrosocarbamate, is a synthetic, injected anabolic–androgenic steroid (AAS) and a nitrosocarbamate ester of nandrolone (19-nortestosterone) which was developed as an cytostatic antineoplastic agent but was never marketed.

List of Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1727

This is a list of Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1727.

Novgorod Governorate

Novgorod Governorate (Russian: Новгоро́дская губе́рния, Novgorodskaya guberniya, Government of Novgorod), was an administrative division (a guberniya) of the Russian Empire and the Russian SFSR, which existed from 1727 to 1776 and from 1796 to 1927. Its administrative center was in the city of Novgorod. The governorate was located in the northwest of the European part of the Russian Empire.

Sieges of Ceuta (1694–1727)

The Sieges of Ceuta (also known as the Thirty-year Siege) were a series of blockades by Moroccan forces of the Spanish-held city of Ceuta on the North African coast. The first siege began on 23 October 1694 and finished in 1720 when reinforcements arrived. During the 26 years of the siege, the city underwent changes leading to the loss of its Portuguese character. While most of the military operations took place around the city walls (Muralles Reales), there were also small-scale penetrations by Spanish forces at various points on the Moroccan coast, and seizure of shipping in the Strait of Gibraltar. The city was placed under a second siege in 1721 until 22 April 1727.

Thirteenth Siege of Gibraltar

The Siege of Gibraltar of 1727 (thirteenth siege of Gibraltar, second by Spain) saw Spanish forces besiege the British garrison of Gibraltar as part of the Anglo-Spanish War. Depending on the sources, Spanish troops numbered between 12,000 and 25,000. British defenders were 1,500 at the beginning of the siege, increasing up to about 5,000. After a five-month siege with several unsuccessful and costly assaults, Spanish troops gave up and withdrew. Following the failure the war drew to a close, opening the way for the 1728 Treaty of El Pardo and the Treaty of Seville signed in 1729.

Treaty of Kyakhta (1727)

The Treaty of Kyakhta (or Kiakhta) (Russian: Кяхтинский договор, Kjahtinskij dogovor; Chinese: 布連斯奇條約/恰克圖條約; pinyin: Bùliánsīqí / Qiàkètú tiáoyuē, Wade-Giles: Pu4lien2ssŭ1ch‘i2 / Ch‘ia4k‘o4tu2 t‘iao2yüeh1, Xiao'erjing: بُلِيًاصِٿِ / ٿِاكْتُ تِيَوْيُؤ; Mongolian: Хиагтын гэрээ, Xiagtın gerê; Manchu: ᠵᡠᠸᠠᠨᡝᠮᡠᡥᠠᠴᡳᠨ ᡳᠪᡳᡨᡥᡝ, Wylie: chuwan emu hatsin-i pitghe, Möllendorff: juwan emu hacin-i bithe), along with the Treaty of Nerchinsk (1689), regulated the relations between Imperial Russia and the Qing Empire of China until the mid-19th century. It was signed by Tulišen and Count Sava Lukich Raguzinskii-Vladislavich at the border city of Kyakhta on 23 August 1727.

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