16th parallel north

The 16th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 16 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane. It crosses Africa, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, Central America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic Ocean.

At this latitude the sun is visible for 13 hours, 5 minutes during the summer solstice and 11 hours, 11 minutes during the winter solstice.[1]

Line across the Earth
16°
16th parallel north

As a dividing line

After World War II, the parallel divided Vietnam into Chinese and British controlled zones; this eventually formed the Communist North Vietnam and the anti-communist South Vietnam. (See Timeline of World War II (1945).)

In the Chadian–Libyan conflict, from 1984 the parallel, known as the "Red Line", delineated areas controlled by opposing combatants. Previously the Red Line had been the 15th parallel north. (See also Operation Manta.)

Around the world

Starting at the Prime Meridian and heading eastwards, the parallel 16° north passes through:

Co-ordinates Country, territory or sea Notes
16°0′N 0°0′E / 16.000°N 0.000°E  Mali
16°0′N 4°0′E / 16.000°N 4.000°E  Niger
16°0′N 14°39′E / 16.000°N 14.650°E  Chad
16°0′N 24°0′E / 16.000°N 24.000°E  Sudan
16°0′N 36°50′E / 16.000°N 36.833°E  Eritrea
16°0′N 39°16′E / 16.000°N 39.267°E Red Sea
16°0′N 40°3′E / 16.000°N 40.050°E  Eritrea Island of Nahaleg
16°0′N 40°5′E / 16.000°N 40.083°E Red Sea
16°0′N 42°49′E / 16.000°N 42.817°E  Yemen
16°0′N 52°10′E / 16.000°N 52.167°E Indian Ocean Arabian Sea
16°0′N 73°29′E / 16.000°N 73.483°E  India Maharashtra
Karnataka
Andhra Pradesh
Telangana
16°0′N 81°9′E / 16.000°N 81.150°E Indian Ocean Bay of Bengal
16°0′N 94°13′E / 16.000°N 94.217°E  Myanmar (Burma) Irrawaddy River delta
16°0′N 95°41′E / 16.000°N 95.683°E Indian Ocean Gulf of Martaban, Andaman Sea
16°0′N 97°35′E / 16.000°N 97.583°E  Myanmar (Burma)
16°0′N 98°36′E / 16.000°N 98.600°E  Thailand
16°0′N 105°25′E / 16.000°N 105.417°E  Laos
16°0′N 107°27′E / 16.000°N 107.450°E  Vietnam Passing just south of Da Nang
16°0′N 108°16′E / 16.000°N 108.267°E South China Sea Passing through the disputed Paracel Islands
16°0′N 119°45′E / 16.000°N 119.750°E  Philippines Island of Luzon
16°0′N 121°39′E / 16.000°N 121.650°E Pacific Ocean Philippine Sea
Passing just south of the island of Farallon de Medinilla,  Northern Mariana Islands
into an unnamed part of the Ocean
16°0′N 97°50′W / 16.000°N 97.833°W  Mexico
16°0′N 95°24′W / 16.000°N 95.400°W Pacific Ocean Gulf of Tehuantepec
16°0′N 93°59′W / 16.000°N 93.983°W  Mexico
16°0′N 91°46′W / 16.000°N 91.767°W  Guatemala
16°0′N 89°13′W / 16.000°N 89.217°W  Belize
16°0′N 88°54′W / 16.000°N 88.900°W Caribbean Sea Passing just north of Punta de Manabique,  Guatemala
Passing just south of the island of Útila,  Honduras
16°0′N 85°58′W / 16.000°N 85.967°W  Honduras
16°0′N 85°53′W / 16.000°N 85.883°W Caribbean Sea Passing just north of Cape Camarón,  Honduras
16°0′N 61°44′W / 16.000°N 61.733°W  France Island of Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe
16°0′N 61°35′W / 16.000°N 61.583°W Atlantic Ocean
16°0′N 61°17′W / 16.000°N 61.283°W  France Island of Marie-Galante, Guadeloupe
16°0′N 61°15′W / 16.000°N 61.250°W Atlantic Ocean
16°0′N 22°55′W / 16.000°N 22.917°W  Cape Verde Island of Boa Vista
16°0′N 22°46′W / 16.000°N 22.767°W Atlantic Ocean
16°0′N 16°30′W / 16.000°N 16.500°W  Senegal
16°0′N 13°22′W / 16.000°N 13.367°W  Mauritania
16°0′N 5°24′W / 16.000°N 5.400°W  Mali

See also

References

  1. ^ http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/Dur_OneYear.php
15th parallel north

The 15th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 15 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane. It crosses Africa, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, Central America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic Ocean.

In the Chadian-Libyan conflict of 1978 to 1987, the parallel, known as the "Red Line", delineated areas controlled by opposing combatants. (See also Operation Manta.)

At this latitude the sun is visible for 13 hours, 1 minute during the summer solstice and 11 hours, 14 minutes during the winter solstice.

16th parallel

16th parallel may refer to:

16th parallel north, a circle of latitude in the Northern Hemisphere

16th parallel south, a circle of latitude in the Southern Hemisphere

17th parallel north

The 17th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 17 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane. It crosses Africa, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, Central America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic Ocean.

The parallel is particularly significant in the history of Vietnam (see below).

At this latitude the sun is visible for 13 hours, 9 minutes during the summer solstice and 11 hours, 7 minutes during the winter solstice.

Dong Phaya Yen Mountains

Dong Phaya Yen or Dong Phya Yen (Thai: ทิวเขาดงพญาเย็น, pronounced [dōŋ pʰājāː jēn], lit. "jungle of the cold lord") is a mountain range in Phetchabun, Chaiyaphum, Lopburi, Saraburi, and Nakhon Ratchasima Provinces, Thailand.

As the Dong Phaya Yen is less compact and lower in height than the mountain ranges to the north and to the south, the first roads and railroads connecting the region of Isan with the capital Bangkok were built across these mountains. Before the construction of the railroad at the beginning of the 20th century, communication between these two parts of Thailand was difficult. The survey for the building of the Northeastern Line of the State Railway of Thailand began in 1887.

List of circles of latitude

Following is a list of circles of latitude on Earth.

Phetchabun Mountains

The Phetchabun mountains (Thai: ทิวเขาเพชรบูรณ์, RTGS: Thio Khao Phetchabun, pronounced [tʰīw kʰǎw pʰét.t͡ɕʰā.būːn]) are a mountain massif in Phetchabun, Phitsanulok, Loei and Chaiyaphum Provinces, Thailand. It consists of two parallel mountain chains, with the valley of the Pa Sak River in the middle.

The strange rock formations of Phu Hin Rong Kla and fields where the Siam tulip flower (Curcuma alismatifolia), known as dok krachiao (ดอกกระเจียว) in Thai, grows wild are some of the characteristics of the Phetchabun Mountains.

Red Line

Red Line may refer to:

Red line (phrase), a figurative phrase used in English and Hebrew meaning a limit past which something shouldn't cross safely

Red line (hockey), the center of the playing surface on an ice hockey rink

Red Line Synthetic Oil Corporation, an oil manufacturer for automotive and other performance applications

The All Red Line network of telegraph cables linking the British Empire

The Red Line Agreement, an agreement signed by partners in the Turkish Petroleum Company in 1928

The military line of defense in Operation Manta of the Chadian-Libyan Conflict along the 15th and later 16th parallel north

Red Line (Namibia), a pest-exclusion fence separating Northern Namibia from the central and southern parts

Role of the United States in the Vietnam War

The role of the United States in the Vietnam War began after World War II and escalated into full commitment during the Vietnam War from 1955 to 1973. The U.S. involvement in South Vietnam stemmed from 20 long years of political and economic action. These had the common incentive of ending the growing communist domination in Vietnam. At the time, French forces, allies of the U.S., were backed by America — President Harry S. Truman provided progressively increasing amounts of financial and military assistance to French forces fighting in Vietnam. From the spring of 1950, their involvement increased from just assisting French troops to providing direct military assistance to the associated states (Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia). Eventually, U.S. missions were carried out at a more constant rate by sending out increasing number of military assistance from the United States. Their main intent was to restrict the Communist domination that was present in the government of Vietnam as it would soon lead to a chain of neighbouring countries adopting the same. This would have resulted in a change in balance of power throughout Southeast Asia. The U.S. foreign policy establishment saw national security interests being disturbed due to the rise of this communist expansion and strived to take any measure to end it. Their actions came to be questioned by other segments of government and society, however, including the US congress..

Estimates of the number of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians killed vary from 966,000 to 3,812,000. The conflict also resulted in 58,318 US soldiers dead.

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