16K resolution

The term 16K resolution (8640p) refers to a display resolution that has 15360 horizontal pixels by 8640 vertical pixels, for a total of 132.7 megapixels.[1] It has four times as many pixels as 8K resolution, sixteen times as many pixels as 4K resolution and sixty-four times as many pixels as 1080p resolution.

Innolux's 100-inch 16K8K S-UHD (15360×8640) display module displayed at Touch Taiwan is the only single display as of August 2018.[2]

Currently 16k resolutions can run on Multi-monitor setups with AMD Eyefinity or NVIDIA Surround.[3][4]

Possible 16k resolutions
Resolution aspect ratio Megapixels
15360 x 4320 3.5:1 (32:9) 66.4
15360 × 6400 2.4:1 (24:10) 98.3
15360 × 6480 2.37 (64:27) 99.5
15360 × 7680 2:1 (18:9) 118
15360 × 8640 1.7:1 (16:9) 132.7
15360 × 9600 1.6:1 (16:10) 147.5
16200 x 4500p 3.6 (36:10) 72.9
16200 x 6750p 2.4:1 (24:10) 109.4
16200 x 10125p 1.6:1 (16:10) 164
16384 × 8192 2:1 (18:9) 134.2
16384 × 10240 1.6:1 (16:10) 167.8
16384 x 16384 1.0:1 (1:1) 268.4
16640 x 4680 3.5:1 (32:9) 77.9
16640 × 7020 2.37 (64:27) 116.8

History

NHK from Japan has developed a full resolution 16K recording single chip camera that shoots at 240fps at 15360 × 8640p at 12bitHDR High Speed Camera in association with Hitachi that is exhibited at NAB 2018.[5] This camera is the world's highest resolution digital camera as of 2019.[6]

AMD has announced a target for their future graphics cards to support 16K resolution with a refresh rate of 240Hz for 'true immersion' in VR.[7][8][9]

See also

References

  1. ^ Brawn, Alan C. (April 19, 2017). "4K, 8K, 16K – Are You Ready for the Resolution Evolution?". CE Pro. Retrieved August 5, 2017.
  2. ^ Lokas, Damir (August 23, 2018). "Innolux Premieres World's First 100 Inch 16K Display The Best Vision Ever". DisplayDaily. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  3. ^ Orland, Kyle (August 3, 2017). "What kind of gaming rig can run at 16K resolution?". ArsTechnica. Retrieved August 5, 2017.
  4. ^ "Gaming at 16K resolution?? – Holy $h!t". Linus Tech Tips. YouTube. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  5. ^ https://www.studiodaily.com/2018/04/nab-wrap-8k-esports-full-frame-cameras-hdr-goggles-free-immersion/
  6. ^ https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8281412/
  7. ^ "AMD Radeon Pro graphics card powers 16K display, 15,360×8640". Tweaktown. Retrieved July 27, 2016.
  8. ^ "AMD's graphics boss says VR needs 16K at 240Hz for 'true immersion'". Tweaktown. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  9. ^ "AMD's Raja Koduri says that we need 16K at 240Hz for "true immersion" in VR". Overclock3D.net. Retrieved January 16, 2016.
1080p

1080p (1920×1080 px; also known as Full HD or FHD and BT.709) is a set of HDTV high-definition video modes characterized by 1,920 pixels displayed across the screen horizontally and 1,080 pixels down the screen vertically; the p stands for progressive scan, i.e. non-interlaced. The term usually assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9, implying a resolution of 2.1 megapixels. It is often marketed as full HD, to contrast 1080p with 720p resolution screens.

1080p video signals are supported by ATSC standards in the United States and DVB standards in Europe. Applications of the 1080p standard include television broadcasts, Blu-ray Discs, smartphones, Internet content such as YouTube videos and Netflix TV shows and movies, consumer-grade televisions and projectors, computer monitors and video game consoles. Small camcorders, smartphones and digital cameras can capture still and moving images in 1080p resolution.

2K resolution

2K resolution is a generic term for display devices or content having horizontal resolution of approximately 2,000 pixels. Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI) defines 2K resolution standard as 2048×1080.In the movie projection industry, DCI is the dominant standard for 2K output.

4K resolution

4K resolution, also called 4K, refers to a horizontal display resolution of approximately 4,000 pixels. Digital television and digital cinematography commonly use several different 4K resolutions. In television and consumer media, 3840 × 2160 (4K UHD) is the dominant 4K standard, whereas the movie projection industry uses 4096 × 2160 (DCI 4K).

The 4K television market share increased as prices fell dramatically during 2014 and 2015. By 2020, more than half of U.S. households are expected to have 4K-capable TVs, a much faster adoption rate than that of Full HD (1080p).

5K resolution

5K resolution refers to display formats with a horizontal resolution of around 5,000 pixels. The most common 5K resolution is 5120 × 2880, which has an aspect ratio of 16:9 with around 14.7 million pixels (just over seven times as many pixels as 1080p Full HD), with four times the linear resolution of 720p. This resolution is typically used in computer monitors to achieve a higher dpi, and is not a standard format in digital television and digital cinematography, which feature 4K resolutions and 8K resolutions.In comparison to 4K UHD (3840 × 2160), the 16:9 5K resolution of 5120 × 2880 offers 1280 extra columns and 720 extra lines of display area, an increase of 33.33% in each dimension. This additional display area can allow 4K content to be displayed at native resolution without filling the entire screen, which means that additional software such as video editing suite toolbars will be available without having to downscale the content previews.As of 2016, the world uses 1080p as the mainstream HD standard. However, there is a rapid increase in media content being released in 4K and even 5K resolution. Online streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon Video launched videos in 4K resolution in 2014 and are actively expanding their collection of videos in 4K resolution. As 4K content becomes more common, the usefulness of 5K displays in editing and content creation may lead to a higher demand in the future.

8K resolution

8K resolution refers to any screen or display with around 8000 pixels width. 8K UHD, also known as Full UHD, FUHD, or Full Ultra HD is the current highest ultra high definition television (UHDTV) resolution in digital television, digital cinematography and digital signage. 8K in 8K UHD refers to the horizontal resolution of 7,680 pixels, forming the total image dimensions of (7680×4320), also known as 4320p, which refers to the vertical resolution.8K UHD has twice as many horizontal and twice as many vertical pixels as 4K UHD, as well as four times the linear resolution of 1080p (Full HD), and six times the linear resolution of 720p. 8K displays are able to produce images with such smooth gradients and high levels of sharpness that objects shown can appear even more realistic than in real world. This phenomenon is referred to as hyperrealism.High-resolution displays such as 8K allow for each pixel to be indistinguishable to the human eye when viewed at a typical distance from the screen. 8K resolution can also be used for the purpose of creating enhanced lower resolution videos through a combination of cropping techniques and/or with downsampling techniques used in video and film editing. Resolutions such as 8K allows filmmakers to shoot in a high resolution with a wide lens or at a further distance, in the case of potentially dangerous subjects (such as in wildlife documentaries), by being able to zoom and crop digitally in post-production. The technique involves taking a portion of the original 8K image and cropping it to match a smaller resolution such as the current industry standard for high-definition televisions (4K, 1080p, and 720p).8K display resolution is the successor to 4K resolution. TV manufacturers pushed to make 4K a new standard by 2017. The feasibility of a fast transition to this new standard is questionable in view of the absence of broadcasting resources. It is predicted that 8K-ready devices will still only account for 3% of UHD TVs by 2023 with global sales of 11 million units a year. However, TV manufacturers remain optimistic as the 4K market grew much faster than expected, with actual sales exceeding projections nearly 6-fold in 2016.As of 2018, few cameras had the capability to shoot video in 8K, with NHK being one of the only companies to have created a small broadcasting camera with an 8K image sensor. By 2018 Red Digital Cinema camera company had delivered three 8K cameras in both a Full Frame sensor and Super 35 sensor. Until major content sources are available, 8K is speculated to become a mainstream consumer display resolution around 2023 as mentioned in UHD forum Phase-B recommendations. Despite this,

filmmakers are pushing demand for 8K cameras due to their ability to capture better 4K footage.

List of 4K video recording devices

This is a list of devices which can record video in 4K resolution. As digital video authoring systems could be considered re-recording systems, these should be included.

Virtual reality

Virtual reality (VR) is an interactive computer-generated experience taking place within a simulated environment. It incorporates mainly auditory and visual feedback, but may also allow other types of sensory feedback like haptic. This immersive environment can be similar to the real world or it can be fantastical. Augmented reality systems may also be considered a form of VR that layers virtual information over a live camera feed into a headset or through a smartphone or tablet device giving the user the ability to view three-dimensional images.

Current VR technology most commonly uses virtual reality headsets or multi-projected environments, sometimes in combination with physical environments or props, to generate realistic images, sounds and other sensations that simulate a user's physical presence in a virtual or imaginary environment. A person using virtual reality equipment is able to "look around" the artificial world, move around in it, and interact with virtual features or items. The effect is commonly created by VR headsets consisting of a head-mounted display with a small screen in front of the eyes, but can also be created through specially designed rooms with multiple large screens.

VR systems that include transmission of vibrations and other sensations to the user through a game controller or other devices are known as haptic systems. This tactile information is generally known as force feedback video gaming and training applications.

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