1675

1675 (MDCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1675th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 675th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1675, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1675 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1675
MDCLXXV
Ab urbe condita2428
Armenian calendar1124
ԹՎ ՌՃԻԴ
Assyrian calendar6425
Balinese saka calendar1596–1597
Bengali calendar1082
Berber calendar2625
English Regnal year26 Cha. 2 – 27 Cha. 2
Buddhist calendar2219
Burmese calendar1037
Byzantine calendar7183–7184
Chinese calendar甲寅(Wood Tiger)
4371 or 4311
    — to —
乙卯年 (Wood Rabbit)
4372 or 4312
Coptic calendar1391–1392
Discordian calendar2841
Ethiopian calendar1667–1668
Hebrew calendar5435–5436
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1731–1732
 - Shaka Samvat1596–1597
 - Kali Yuga4775–4776
Holocene calendar11675
Igbo calendar675–676
Iranian calendar1053–1054
Islamic calendar1085–1086
Japanese calendarEnpō 3
(延宝3年)
Javanese calendar1597–1598
Julian calendarGregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar4008
Minguo calendar237 before ROC
民前237年
Nanakshahi calendar207
Thai solar calendar2217–2218
Tibetan calendar阳木虎年
(male Wood-Tiger)
1801 or 1420 or 648
    — to —
阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
1802 or 1421 or 649

Events

January–June

July–December

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ Headland, Robert (1992). The Island of South Georgia (2nd ed.). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-42474-7.
  2. ^ de Seixas y Lovera, Francisco (1690). Descripcion geographica, y derrotero de la region austral Magallanica. Madrid: Antonio de Zafra.
  3. ^ Wace, N. M. (1969). "The discovery, exploitation and settlement of the Tristan da Cunha Islands". Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia (South Australian Branch). 10: 11–40.
  4. ^ "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p30
1675 in Denmark

Events from the year 1675 in Denmark.

1675 in England

Events from the year 1675 in England.

1675 in France

Events from the year 1675 in France

1675 in Ireland

Events from the year 1675 in Ireland.

1675 in Japan

Events in the year 1675 in Japan.

1675 in Norway

Events in the year 1675 in Norway.

1675 in Sweden

Events from the year 1675 in Sweden

1677 in Ireland

Events from the year 1677 in Ireland.

Daniel Johnson (pirate)

Daniel Johnson (1629–1675) was an English buccaneer who, serving under buccaneers as Moyse Van Vin and Pierre le Picard, sailed against the Spanish during the late 17th century becoming known among the Spanish as "Johnson the Terror". There is little record of his career aside from a single body of work, Appleton's Cyclopædia of American Biography (1887), suggesting he may be a fictional character.

Humphrey Henchman

Humphrey Henchman (1592 – 1675) was a Church of England clergyman and bishop of London from 1663 to 1675.

IEEE 1675-2008

IEEE 1675-2008 was a standard for broadband over power lines developed by the IEEE Standards Association. It provided electric utility companies with a comprehensive standard for safely installing hardware required for Internet access capabilities over their power lines.

The standard was published 7 January 2008. The IEEE 1901 standard was another related attempt published in 2011.

John Erskine, Earl of Mar (1675–1732)

John Erskine, Earl of Mar, KT (1675 – May 1732) was a Scottish Jacobite who was the eldest son of Charles, Earl of Mar (who died in 1689), from whom he inherited estates that were heavily loaded with debt. He was the 23rd Earl of Mar in the first creation of the earldom. He was also the sixth earl in the seventh creation (of 1565).. He was nicknamed "Bobbing John", for his tendency to shift back and forth from faction to faction, whether from Tory to Whig or Hanoverian to Jacobite. Deprived of office by the new king in 1714, Mar raised the standard of rebellion against the Hanoverians; at the battle of Sheriffmuir in November 1715, Mar's forces outnumbered those of his opponent, but victory eluded him. At Fetteresso his cause was lost, and Mar fled to France, where he would spend the remainder of his life. The parliament passed a Writ of Attainder for treason against Mar in 1716 as punishment for his disloyalty, which was not lifted until 1824. He died in 1732.

King Philip's War

King Philip's War (sometimes called the First Indian War, Metacom's War, Metacomet's War, Pometacomet's Rebellion, or Metacom's Rebellion) was an armed conflict in 1675–78 between Indian inhabitants of New England and New England colonists and their Indian allies. The war is named for Metacomet, the Wampanoag chief who adopted the name Philip because of the friendly relations between his father Massasoit and the Mayflower Pilgrims. The war continued in the most northern reaches of New England until the signing of the Treaty of Casco Bay in April 1678.Massasoit had maintained a long-standing alliance with the colonists. Metacom (c. 1638–1676) was his younger son, and he became tribal chief in 1662 after Massasoit's death. Metacom, however, did not maintain his father's alliance between the Wampanoags and the colonists. The colonists insisted that the peace agreement in 1671 should include the surrender of Indian guns; then three Wampanoags were hanged for murder in Plymouth Colony in 1675 which increased the tensions. Colonial militia and Indian raiding parties spread over Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Maine over the next six months. The Narragansetts remained neutral, but several individual Narragansetts participated in raids of colonial strongholds and militia, so colonial leaders deemed the Narragansetts to be in violation of peace treaties. They assembled the largest colonial army that New England had yet mustered, consisting of 1,000 militia and 150 Indian allies, and Governor Josiah Winslow marshaled them to attack the Narragansetts in November 1675. They attacked and burned Indian villages throughout Rhode Island territory, culminating with the attack on the Narragansetts' main fort called the Great Swamp Fight. An estimated 150 Narragansetts were killed, many of them women and children, and the Indian coalition was then taken over by Narragansett sachem Canonchet. They pushed back the colonial frontier in Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, and Rhode Island colonies, burning towns as they went, including Providence in March 1676. However, the colonial militia overwhelmed the Indian coalition and, by the end of the war, the Wampanoags and their Narragansett allies were almost completely destroyed. Metacom fled to Mount Hope where he was finally killed by the militia.

The war was the greatest calamity to occur in seventeenth-century New England and is considered by many to be the deadliest war in the history of American colonization. In the space of little more than a year, 12 of the region's towns were destroyed and many more were damaged, the economy of Plymouth and Rhode Island Colonies was all but ruined and their population was decimated, losing one-tenth of all men available for military service. More than half of New England's towns were attacked by Indians.King Philip's War began the development of an independent American identity. The New England colonists faced their enemies without support from any outside government or military, and this gave them a group identity separate and distinct from Britain.

List of Fellows of the Royal Society elected in 1675

This is a list of Fellows of the Royal Society elected in its 16th year, 1675.

List of windmills in Oxfordshire

This is a list of windmills in the ceremonial county of Oxfordshire, England.

List of windmills in Somerset

This is a list of windmills in the English county of Somerset.

Sabará

Sabará is a Brazilian municipality located in the state of Minas Gerais. The city belongs to the mesoregion Metropolitana de Belo Horizonte and to the microregion of Belo Horizonte.

Scanian War

The Scanian War (Danish: Skånske krig, Swedish: Skånska kriget, German: Schonischer Krieg) was a part of the Northern Wars involving the union of Denmark–Norway, Brandenburg and Sweden. It was fought from 1675 to 1679 mainly on Scanian soil, in the former Danish provinces along the border with Sweden and in Northern Germany. While the latter battles are regarded as a theater of the Scanian war in English, Danish and Swedish historiography, they are seen as a separate war in German historiography, called the Swedish-Brandenburgian War (German: Schwedisch-Brandenburgischer Krieg).

The war was prompted by Swedish involvement in the Franco-Dutch War. Sweden had allied with France against several European countries. The United Provinces, under attack by France, sought support from Denmark–Norway. After some hesitation, King Christian V started the invasion of Skåneland (Scania) in 1675, while the Swedish were occupied with a war against Brandenburg. The invasion of Scania was combined with a simultaneous Norwegian front called the Gyldenløve War, forcing the defending Swedes to fight a two-front war in addition to their entanglements in the Holy Roman Empire.

The Danish objective was to retrieve the Scanian lands that had been ceded to Sweden in the Treaty of Roskilde, after the Northern Wars. Although the Danish offensive was initially a great success, Swedish counter-offensives led by the 19-year-old Charles XI of Sweden nullified much of the gain.

At the end of the war, the Swedish navy had lost at sea, the Danish army had been defeated in Scania by the Swedes, who in turn had been beaten in Northern Germany by the Brandenburgers. The war and the hostilities ended when Denmark's ally the United Provinces settled with Sweden's ally France and the Swedish king Charles XI married Danish princess Ulrike Eleonora, sister of Christian V. Peace was made on behalf of France with the treaties of Fontainebleau and Lund (Sweden and Denmark) and Saint-Germain-en-Laye (Sweden and Brandenburg), restoring most of the lost territories to Sweden.

Worli Fort

The Worli Fort is a fort built by the British in Worli, Mumbai, India. The fort, often mistakenly referred to as being built by the Portuguese, was built by the British around 1675. The fort, built on the Worli hill, overlooked the Mahim Bay at a time the city was made up of just seven islands. It was used as a lookout for enemy ships and pirates.

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