15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected by the 15th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on September 19, 1997. It was preceded by the 14th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. It served until 2002.

Standing Committee Members

Ordered in political position ranking
  1. Jiang Zemin
  2. Li Peng
  3. Zhu Rongji
  4. Li Ruihuan
  5. Hu Jintao
  6. Wei Jianxing
  7. Li Lanqing

Members

In stroke order of surnames:
  1. Ding Guangen (丁关根), Secretary of the Secretariat, head of the Propaganda Department
  2. Tian Jiyun (田纪云), Vice-Chairman of the National People's Congress
  3. Zhu Rongji (朱镕基), Premier of the State Council
  4. Jiang Zemin (江泽民), General Secretary of the Communist Party, President of the People's Republic of China, Chairman of the Central Military Commission
  5. Li Peng (李鹏), Chairman of the National People's Congress
  6. Li Changchun (李长春), Party Secretary of Guangdong
  7. Li Lanqing (李岚清), Vice Premier
  8. Li Tieying (李铁映), President of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
  9. Li Ruihuan (李瑞环), Chairman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference
  10. Wu Bangguo (吴邦国), Vice Premier
  11. Wu Guanzheng (吴官正), Party Secretary of Shandong
  12. Chi Haotian (迟浩田), Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission, State Councilor, Minister of Defence
  13. Zhang Wannian (张万年), Secretary of the Secretariat, Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission
  14. Luo Gan (罗干), Secretary of the Secretariat, Secretary of the Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission, State Councilor
  15. Hu Jintao (胡锦涛), Secretary of the Secretariat (first-ranked), Vice President of the People's Republic of China
  16. Jiang Chunyun (姜春云), Vice-Chairman of the National People's Congress
  17. Jia Qinglin (贾庆林), Mayor, then Party Secretary of Beijing
  18. Qian Qichen (钱其琛), Vice Premier
  19. Huang Ju (黄菊), Party Secretary of Shanghai
  20. Wei Jianxing (尉健行), Secretary of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, Secretary of the Secretariat
  21. Wen Jiabao (温家宝), Vice-Premier
  22. Xie Fei (谢非), Vice-Chairman of the National People's Congress (died in office, 1999)

Alternate Members

Ordered in the number of ballots
  1. Zeng Qinghong (曾庆红), Director of the General Office of the Communist Party of China, then head of the Organization Department
  2. Wu Yi (吴仪), State Councilor

External links

14th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 14th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected by the 14th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on October 19, 1992. It was preceded by the 13th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. It served until 1997. It was succeeded by the 15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

15th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China

The 15th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China was in session from 1997 to 2002. The 14th Central Committee preceded it. The China Democracy Party formed in this period, and was suppressed. It held seven plenary sessions. It was followed by the 16th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China.

It elected the 15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China in 1997. Plenary sessions were held by the politburo.

16th Politburo of the Communist Party of China

The 16th Politburo of the Communist Party of China was elected by the 16th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China on November 15, 2002. It was nominally preceded by the 15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China. This was the main vangaurd executive committee functioning within the Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China. It was formally superseded by the 17th Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

1997 in China

The following lists events in the year 1997 in China.

Chi Haotian

General Chi Haotian (simplified Chinese: 迟浩田; traditional Chinese: 遲浩田; pinyin: Chí Hàotián; born 9 July 1929) was a general of the People's Liberation Army.

Ding Guangen

Ding Guangen (Chinese: 丁关根; September 1929 – July 22, 2012) was a Chinese politician who served in senior leadership roles in the Communist Party of China during the 1990s. He was a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China between 1992 and 2002, a member of the Central Secretariat, and one of the top officials in charge of propaganda and ideology during the term of Party General Secretary and President Jiang Zemin.

Prior to his elevation to the Politburo, Ding served successively as Minister of Railways of China between 1985 and 1988, the chief of the Taiwan Affairs Office between 1988 and 1990, and the head of the United Front Work Department of the party between 1990 and 1992.

Huang Ju

Huang Ju (28 September 1938 – 2 June 2007) was a Chinese politician and a high-ranking leader in the Communist Party of China. He was a member of the Politburo Standing Committee, China's top decision making body, between 2002 and 2007, and also served as the first-ranked Vice Premier of the People's Republic of China beginning in 2003. He died in office before he could complete his terms on the Standing Committee and as Vice-Premier.An electrical engineer by trade, Huang was a close confidante of party leader Jiang Zemin, to whom he owed his rise to power. He served as Mayor of Shanghai between 1991 and 1994, then Communist Party Secretary of the metropolis between 1994 and 2002. Huang's career in Shanghai and his family's alleged involvement in several corruption cases in the city generated controversy. After 2002, Huang emerged as one of the least popular and most partisan members of China's top leadership, and was named by observers as a "core member" of the Shanghai clique.

Jia Qinglin

Jia Qinglin (Chinese: 贾庆林; born March 1940) is a retired senior leader of the People's Republic of China and of its ruling Communist Party. He was a member of the Politburo Standing Committee, the party's highest ruling organ, between 2002 and 2012, and Chairman of the National Committee of the People's Political Consultative Conference between 2003 and 2013. Jia's functions as the head of China's consultative legislative body were largely ceremonial in nature.

Jia, an engineer by trade, began his political career in Fujian in 1985. There, he rose steadily through the ranks and led the province during the Yuanhua scandal. In 1996, Jia was transferred to become mayor, then party chief of Beijing. Largely due to his patronage relationship with then General Secretary Jiang Zemin, Jia was promoted to the Politburo in 1997, and remained a mainstay figure in China's political elite for the next fifteen years. He retired in 2013.

Jiang Chunyun

Jiang Chunyun (Chinese: 姜春云; pinyin: Jiāng Chūnyún; born April 1930) is a retired Chinese politician most active in the 1980s and 1990s, who served as Vice-Premier, Vice-Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, and a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China.

Li Changchun

Li Changchun (born February 1944) is a retired Chinese politician and a former senior leader of the Communist Party of China. He served on the Politburo Standing Committee, the Communist Party's top leadership council, and as the top official in charge of propaganda, between 2002 and 2012. He also served as Chairman of the CPC Central Guidance Commission for Building Spiritual Civilization, de facto head of propaganda and media relations. Li had a widely varying political career spanning three provinces, first as Governor of Liaoning, then Party Secretary of Henan, and then Party Secretary of Guangdong, before being promoted to the national leadership in 2002. He retired in 2012.

Li Tieying

Li Tieying (Chinese: 李铁映; born 1936) is a retired politician of the People's Republic of China. He held many positions since 1955, including Vice Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress and President of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He is an author of several books. For more than 20 years he served as Minister in charge of the State Commission for Economic Restructuring, and participated in major decision making and the implementation of China’s economic reforms during that time.

Luo Gan

Luo Gan (simplified Chinese: 罗干; traditional Chinese: 羅幹; born July 18, 1935) is a retired Chinese politician. Between 2002 and 2007, Luo was one of China's top leaders, serving as a member of the nine-man Politburo Standing Committee, and as the Secretary of Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission (Zhengfawei), which became one of China's most powerful political offices, and well-funded bureaucracies, during Luo's term. In his Zhengfawei role, Luo held oversight for many law-enforcement institutions, including the police, public security officers, armed police, labor camps, prisons, and the judicial system. Luo retired from politics in 2007.

Qian Qichen

Qian Qichen (Chinese: 钱其琛; 5 January 1928 – 9 May 2017) was a Chinese diplomat and politician. He served as China's Foreign Minister from April 1988 to March 1998, and as Vice Premier from 1993 to 2003. Since then, no other diplomat-turned-politician has attained such a lofty status in China's political hierarchy.Qian played a critical role in shaping China's foreign policy during President Jiang Zemin's administration, and was a key player handling the return to Chinese sovereignty of Hong Kong and Macau. He was in charge of border negotiations with the Soviet Union in the 1980s, resulting in a successful settlement of the border dispute and the thawing of the relations between China and Russia. He was also instrumental in handling China's normalization of relations with the West in the difficult period after the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989.

Tian Jiyun

Tian Jiyun (simplified Chinese: 田纪云; traditional Chinese: 田紀雲; pinyin: Tián Jìyún; born June 1929 in Feicheng, Shandong) is a politician in the People's Republic of China, known as a supporter of Deng Xiaoping's reforms. The best-known feature of his biography is the speech of 1992, delivered in the Central Party School, in which he ridicules the "leftists" (those who did not support the new policy of openness). Tian proposed they establish their own "economic zones" preserving all the worst features of the old system.

Wen Jiabao

Wen Jiabao (born 15 September 1942) is a retired Chinese politician who served as a sixth Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China and serving as China's head of government for a decade between 2003 and 2013. In his capacity as Premier, Wen was regarded as the leading figure behind Beijing's economic policy. From 2002 to 2012, he held membership in the Politburo Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China, the country's de facto top power organ, where he was ranked third out of nine members and headed by Party general secretary Hu Jintao.

He worked as the chief of the Party General Office between 1986 and 1993, and accompanied Party general secretary Zhao Ziyang to Tiananmen Square during the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests. In 1998, he was promoted to the post of Vice Premier under Premier Zhu Rongji, his mentor, and oversaw the broad portfolios of agriculture and finance.

Wen was dubbed "the people's premier" by both domestic and foreign media. Instead of concentrating on GDP growth in large cities and rich coastal areas, Wen advocated for advancing policies considered more favourable towards farmers and migrant workers. Wen's government reduced agricultural taxes and pursued ambitious infrastructure projects. Following the global financial crisis of 2008, Wen's government injected four trillion yuan as part of a stimulus program.

Seen as the leading member of the reform wing of the Communist Party, Wen's family came under scrutiny by investigative journalists for having accumulated a massive fortune during his time in government, casting a cloud over his legacy shortly prior to his retirement. He left office in 2013 and was succeeded by Li Keqiang.

Wu Bangguo

Wu Bangguo (born 12 July 1941) is a retired high-ranking politician in the People's Republic of China. He was the Chairman and Party secretary of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress from 2003 to 2013, a position that made him China's chief legislator. He ranked second in official rankings of state and party leaders of China.

A native of Anhui, Wu is an electrical engineer by profession, and rose to national fame through regional work as the party chief of Shanghai and as Vice-Premier.

Wu Guanzheng

Wu Guanzheng (born August 1938) is a former Chinese politician and one of the major leaders of the Communist Party of China during the administration of Hu Jintao. He served on the Politburo Standing Committee, the country's top ruling body, from 2002 to 2007. During that time he also served as the Secretary of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Communist Party of China, the party's anti-graft body. He had a lengthy political career, having served as mayor of Wuhan, Governor then Party Secretary of Jiangxi, then party chief of Shandong. Wu retired in 2007 and left public life.

Xie Fei (politician)

Xie Fei (Chinese: 谢非; pinyin: Xiè Fēi; Jyutping: Je Fei; November 4, 1932 – October 27, 1999) was a Chinese politician. He was best known for his term as the Communist Party Secretary of Guangdong between 1991 and 1998, as a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China, and as Vice Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress.

Zhang Wannian

Zhang Wannian (Chinese: 张万年; 1 August 1928 – 14 January 2015) was a general of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) of the People's Republic of China.

15th Politburo of the Communist Party of China (1997–2002)
Standing Committee
Other members
in surname stroke order
Alternate members

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