1543

Year 1543 (MDXLIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. It is one of the years sometimes referred to as an "Annus mirabilis" because of its significant publications in science, considered the start of the scientific revolution.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1543 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1543
MDXLIII
Ab urbe condita2296
Armenian calendar992
ԹՎ ՋՂԲ
Assyrian calendar6293
Balinese saka calendar1464–1465
Bengali calendar950
Berber calendar2493
English Regnal year34 Hen. 8 – 35 Hen. 8
Buddhist calendar2087
Burmese calendar905
Byzantine calendar7051–7052
Chinese calendar壬寅(Water Tiger)
4239 or 4179
    — to —
癸卯年 (Water Rabbit)
4240 or 4180
Coptic calendar1259–1260
Discordian calendar2709
Ethiopian calendar1535–1536
Hebrew calendar5303–5304
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1599–1600
 - Shaka Samvat1464–1465
 - Kali Yuga4643–4644
Holocene calendar11543
Igbo calendar543–544
Iranian calendar921–922
Islamic calendar949–950
Japanese calendarTenbun 12
(天文12年)
Javanese calendar1461–1462
Julian calendar1543
MDXLIII
Korean calendar3876
Minguo calendar369 before ROC
民前369年
Nanakshahi calendar75
Thai solar calendar2085–2086
Tibetan calendar阳水虎年
(male Water-Tiger)
1669 or 1288 or 516
    — to —
阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
1670 or 1289 or 517

Events

January–June

July–December

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ a b c Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 147–150. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  2. ^ a b Bartl, Július. "1543". Slovak history: chronology & lexicon. Bolchazy-Carducci. p. 59. Retrieved 2013-02-11.
  3. ^ Noel Perrin "Giving up the gun", p.7 ISBN 978-0-87923-773-8 Jump up ^
  4. ^ Rowlett, Russ. "Lighthouses of Italy: Liguria". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
  5. ^ Giorgio Vasari. Lives of the Most Eminent Painters Sculptors and Architects. 5 (of 10) Andrea da Fiesole to Lorenzo Lotto. Project Gutenberg.
1543 in Denmark

The following lists events that happened during 1543 in Denmark.

1543 in France

Events from the year 1543 in France.

1543 in Ireland

Events from the year 1543 in Ireland.

1543 in Sweden

Events from the year 1543 in Sweden

Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi

Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi (Somali: Axmad Ibraahim al-Gaasi, Arabic: أحمد بن إبراهيم الغازي‎ ) "the Conqueror" (c. 1506 – February 21, 1543) was a Somali Imam and General of the Adal Sultanate who fought against the Abyssinian empire and defeated several Abysinian Emperors. With the help of an army mainly composed of Somalis, the Harla people, Afars, Hararis and a small number of Arabs and Ottoman Turks, Imam Ahmad (nicknamed Gurey in Somali, "Gura" in Afar and Gragn in Amharic (ግራኝ Graññ), all meaning "the left-handed"), embarked on a conquest which brought three-quarters of Abyssinia (modern day Ethiopia) under the power of the Muslim Sultanate of Adal during the Abyssinian-Adal War from 1529-43.

Alessandro Riario

Alessandro Riario (1543–1585) was an Italian Roman Catholic bishop and cardinal.

Archduchess Helena of Austria (1543–1574)

Archduchess Helena of Austria (German: Helena von Österreich-Habsburg) (January 7, 1543 in Vienna – March 5, 1574 in Hall in Tirol), was a member of the House of Habsburg, and co-founder of the convent in Hall in Tirol.

She was the tenth (but ninth surviving) daughter of fifteen children of Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor and his wife Anne of Bohemia and Hungary.

Asahi no kata

Asahi no kata (朝日の方) (1543 – February 18, 1590) was a half-sister of Toyotomi Hideyoshi and wife of Tokugawa Ieyasu, two of Japan's greatest feudal warlords. She is also called Suruga Gozen (駿河御膳) and Asahi-hime (朝日姫), though none of these are names, referring to her as "the person of Asahi", "the Lady Suruga", or "Princess Asahi".

Asahi no kata was first married to Saji Hyūga no kami, but when her brother Toyotomi Hideyoshi wished to make peace with Tokugawa Ieyasu after the Battle of Komaki and Nagakute, Hideyoshi expressed interest in marrying her to Ieyasu. As a result, Saji Hyūga committed suicide, in order to not pose an obstacle to such a powerful political marriage, and the two were married soon afterwards.

Tokugawa and his new wife visited her mother when she fell ill in 1589; the mother of Asahi no kata and Hideyoshi died the following year, as did Asahi no kata herself. Her buddhist name is Nanmeiin.

Catherine Parr

Catherine Parr (sometimes alternatively spelled Katherine, Katheryn, Kateryn or Katharine) (1512 (1512) – 7 September 1548 (1548-09-08)) was Queen of England and Ireland (1543–47) as the last of the six wives of King Henry VIII, and the final queen consort of the House of Tudor. She married him on 12 July 1543, and outlived him by one year. With four husbands she is the most-married English queen.

Catherine enjoyed a close relationship with Henry's three children and was personally involved in the education of Elizabeth I and Edward VI. She was influential in Henry's passing of the Third Succession Act in 1543 that restored both his daughters, Mary and Elizabeth, to the line of succession to the throne.Catherine was appointed regent from July to September 1544 while Henry was on a military campaign in France and in case he lost his life, she was to rule as regent until Edward came of age. However he did not give her any function in government in his will. In 1543, she published her first book, Psalms or Prayers, anonymously. On account of Catherine's Protestant sympathies, she provoked the enmity of anti-Protestant officials, who sought to turn the King against her; a warrant for her arrest was drawn up in 1545. However, she and the King soon reconciled. Her book Prayers or Meditations became the first book published by an English queen under her own name. She assumed the role of Elizabeth's guardian following the King's death, and published a second book, The Lamentation of a Sinner.

Henry died on 28 January 1547. After the king's death, Catherine was allowed to keep her jewels and gowns and until her own death was possibly considered queen dowager. Six months after Henry's death, she married her fourth and final husband, Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley. The marriage was short-lived, as she died on 7 September 1548, probably of complications of childbirth.

De humani corporis fabrica

De humani corporis fabrica libri septem (Latin for "On the fabric of the human body in seven books") is a set of books on human anatomy written by Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564) and published in 1543. It was a major advance in the history of anatomy over the long-dominant work of Galen, and presented itself as such.

The collection of books is based on his Paduan lectures, during which he deviated from common practice by dissecting a corpse to illustrate what he was discussing. Dissections had previously been performed by a barber surgeon under the direction of a doctor of medicine, who was not expected to perform manual labour. Vesalius's magnum opus presents a careful examination of the organs and the complete structure of the human body. This would not have been possible without the many advances that had been made during the Renaissance, including artistic developments in literal visual representation and the technical development of printing with refined woodcut engravings. Because of these developments and his careful, immediate involvement, Vesalius was able to produce illustrations superior to any produced previously.

De revolutionibus orbium coelestium

De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres) is the seminal work on the heliocentric theory of the astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus (1473–1543) of the Polish Renaissance. The book, first printed in 1543 in Nuremberg, Holy Roman Empire, offered an alternative model of the universe to Ptolemy's geocentric system, which had been widely accepted since ancient times.

Jalan Jengka 4

Jalan Jengka 4, Federal Route 1543' is a main federal road in Bandar Pusat Jengka, Pahang, Malaysia.

At most sections, the Federal Route 1543 was built under the JKR R5 road standard, allowing maximum speed limit of up to 90 km/h.

Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo

Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo (Portuguese: João Rodrigues Cabrilho; 1497 – January 3, 1543) was a Spanish explorer born in Palma del Rio, Córdoba, Spain, although he is also claimed by tradition as a native of Portugal. Among other things he was a maritime navigator known for exploring the West Coast of North America on behalf of the Spanish Empire. Cabrillo was the first European to navigate the coast of present-day California. He is best known for his exploration of the coast of California in 1542–1543. Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo served under the command of Pánfilo de Narváez and aided him in the conquest of Cuba about 1518.

Kōsa

Kōsa (光佐, February 20, 1543 – December 27, 1592), also known as Hongan-ji Kennyo (本願寺 顕如), was the 11th head of the Hongan-ji in Kyoto, and Chief Abbot of Ishiyama Hongan-ji, cathedral fortress of the Ikkō-ikki (Buddhist warrior monks and peasants who opposed samurai rule), during its siege at the end of the Sengoku period. He engineered many alliances, and organized the defenses of the cathedral to the point that most at the time considered Ishiyama Hongan-ji to be unbreachable.

Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542

The Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542 (Welsh: Y Deddfau Cyfreithiau yng Nghymru 1535 a 1542) were parliamentary measures by which Wales became a full and equal part of the Kingdom of England and the legal system of England was extended to Wales and the norms of English administration introduced. The intention was to create a single state and legal jurisdiction. The Acts were passed during the reign of King Henry VIII of England, who came from the Welsh Tudor dynasty.

Before these Acts, Wales was excluded from Parliamentary representation and divided between the Principality of Wales, and a large number of feudal statelets; the marcher Lordships.

The Act declared King Henry's intentions, that because of differences in law and language:

"(4) some rude and ignorant People have made Distinction and Diversity between the King's Subjects of this Realm, and his Subjects of the said Dominion and Principality of Wales, whereby great Discord, Variance, Debate, Division, Murmur and Sedition hath grown between his said Subjects;(5) His Highness therefore of a singular Zeal, Love and Favour that he beareth towards his Subjects of his said Dominion of Wales, minding and intending to reduce them to the perfect Order, Notice and Knowledge of his Laws of this Realm, and utterly to extirp all and singular the sinister Usages and Customs differing from the same, and to bring the said Subjects of this his Realm, and of his said Dominion of Wales, to an amicable Concord and Unity..."- and therefore:

"That his said Country or Dominion of Wales shall be, stand and continue for ever from henceforth incorporated, united and annexed to and with this his Realm of England;"

Mary Boleyn

Mary Boleyn, also known as Lady Mary (c. 1499/1500 – 19 July 1543), was the sister of English queen Anne Boleyn, whose family enjoyed considerable influence during the reign of King Henry VIII.

Mary was one of the mistresses of Henry VIII for an unknown period of time. It has been rumoured that she bore two of the king's children, though Henry did not acknowledge either of them as he had acknowledged Henry FitzRoy, his son by another mistress, Elizabeth Blount. Mary was also rumoured to have been a mistress of Henry VIII's rival, King Francis I of France, for some period between 1515 and 1519.Mary Boleyn was married twice: in 1520 to William Carey, and again, secretly, in 1534, to William Stafford, a soldier from a good family but with few prospects. This secret marriage to a man considered beneath her station angered both King Henry VIII and her sister, Queen Anne, and resulted in Mary's banishment from the royal court. She died seven years later, having spent the remainder of her life in obscurity.

Ottoman–Habsburg wars in Hungary (1526–1568)

The Habsburgs and their allies and the Ottoman Empire engaged in a series of military campaigns against one another in Hungary between 1526 and 1568. While overall the Ottomans had the upper hand, the war failed to produce any decisive result. The Ottoman army remained very powerful in the open field but it often lost a significant amount of time besieging the many fortresses of the Hungarian frontier and its communication lines were now dangerously overstretched. At the end of the conflict, Hungary had been split into several different zones of control, between the Ottomans, Habsburgs, and Transylvania, an Ottoman vassal state.

Siege of Nice

The Siege of Nice occurred in 1543 and was part of the Italian War of 1542–46 in which Francis I and Suleiman the Magnificent collaborated in a Franco-Ottoman alliance against the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, and Henry VIII of England. At that time, Nice was under the control of Charles III, Duke of Savoy, an ally of Charles V. This is part of the 1543–1544 Mediterranean campaign of Barbarossa.

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