14th century in Wales

This article is about the particular significance of the century 1301 - 1400 to Wales and its people.

Princes of Wales

Princesses of Wales

Events

1301

1302

1303

1304

1305

  • Denbigh Castle is substantially completed; 183 settlers are recorded as living outside the town walls and only 52 inside the town's defences.

1306

  • Work on Beaumaris Castle restarts, after a six-year gap, prompted by fears of a Scottish invasion of North Wales.[1]

1307

1308

1310

1311

1314

1315

  • January - Roger Mortimer de Chirk is removed from his office of Justiciar of North Wales.
  • King Edward II of England, as guardian of the three heiresses of the estate of Gilbert de Clare, appoints Payn de Turberville of Coity as administrator.

1316

1317

1318

1321

1322

1323

1326

1327

1328

1329

  • February - Following her elopement with (or abduction by) William de la Zouche, Eleanor de Clare, is again imprisoned in the Tower of London.

1330

1339

1343

1345

1346

1347

1349

1361

1369

  • Owain Lawgoch launches an unsuccessful invasion attempt on Wales.

1372

  • May - In Paris, Owain Lawgoch announces his intention of claiming the throne of Wales.
  • Owain Lawgoch and his invasion force arrive in Guernsey.

1375

1376

1377

1384

1386

1397

1399

1400

Births

1330

1341

1374

1376

1391

Deaths

1304

1311

1314

1315

1326

1327

1330

1337

1342

1347

1349

1352

1356

1360

1370 1363

1372

1373

1376

1378

  • July - Owain Lawgoch, claimant to the principality of Wales (assassinated), ?48

1381

  • probable - Sir Hywel ap Gruffydd ("Syr Hywel y Fwyall"), soldier in the service of King Edward III of England

1383

1385

1387

1390

1394

1398

1400

References

  1. ^ Taylor, Arnold (2004) [1980], Beaumaris Castle (5th ed.), Cardiff, UK: Cadw, pp. 8, 10–11, ISBN 1-85760-208-0
  2. ^ Pettifer, Adrian, Welsh Castles: a Guide by Counties. Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2000. p.60.
  3. ^ Weir, Alison. (2006) Queen Isabella: She-Wolf of France, Queen of England. London: Pimlico Books. ISBN 978-0-7126-4194-4. p.136.
  4. ^ Weir, Alison. (2006) Queen Isabella: She-Wolf of France, Queen of England. London: Pimlico Books. ISBN 978-0-7126-4194-4. p.136.
  5. ^ Costain, Thomas Bertam. (1962) The Three Edwards. London: Doubleday. pp.196-97
  6. ^ Ian Mortimer, The Greatest Traitor, Vintage Books, 2010. ISBN 9780099552222. p 157
  7. ^ Birch, Walter de Gray, 'A History of Neath Abbey derived from original documents ... with some account of the castle and town of Neath [and] notices of the other monasteries of Glamorganshire' (Neath, 1902) pp. 125-126
  8. ^ Rev. John Milner, History of Antiquities of Winchester, p. 213.
Despenser War

The Despenser War (1321–22) was a baronial revolt against Edward II of England led by the Marcher Lords Roger Mortimer and Humphrey de Bohun. The rebellion was fuelled by opposition to Hugh Despenser the Younger, the royal favourite. After the rebels' summer campaign of 1321, Edward was able to take advantage of a temporary peace to rally more support and a successful winter campaign in southern Wales, culminating in royal victory at the battle of Boroughbridge in the north of England in March 1322. Edward's response to victory was his increasingly harsh rule until his fall from power in 1326.

List of years in Wales

Indexes of individual years in Wales.

2010s - 2000s - 1990s - 1980s - 1970s - 1960s - 1950s - 1940s - 1930s - 1920s - 1910s - 1900s - 1890s - 1880s - 1870s - 1860s - 1850s - 1840s - 1830s - 1820s - 1810s - 1800s - 1790s - 1780s - 1770s - 1760s - 1750s - 1740s - 1730s - 1720s - 1710s - Pre-1710

Principality of Wales

The Principality of Wales (Welsh: Tywysogaeth Cymru) existed between 1216 and 1536, encompassing two-thirds of modern Wales during its height between 1267 and 1277. For most of its history it was "annexed and united" to the English Crown except for its earliest few decades. However, for a few generations, specifically the period from its foundation in 1216 to Edward I's completion of the conquest of Wales in 1284, it was de facto independent under a Welsh Prince of Wales, albeit one who swore fealty to the King of England.

The Principality was formally founded in 1216 at the Council of Aberdyfi and later recognised by the 1218 Treaty of Worcester between Llywelyn the Great of Wales and Henry III of England. The treaty gave substance to the political reality of 13th-century Wales and England, and the relationship of the former with the Angevin Empire. The principality retained a great degree of autonomy, characterized by a separate legal jurisprudence based on the well established laws of Cyfraith Hywel, and by the increasingly sophisticated court of the House of Aberffraw. Although it owed fealty to the Angevin king of England, the principality was de facto independent, with a similar status in the empire to the Kingdom of Scotland. Its existence has been seen as proof that all the elements necessary for the growth of Welsh statehood were in place.The period of de facto independence ended with Edward I's conquest of the Principality between 1277 and 1283. Under the Statute of Rhuddlan the Principality lost its independence and became effectively an annexed territory of the English crown. From 1301, the crown's lands in north and west Wales formed part of the appanage of England's heir apparent, with the title "Prince of Wales". On accession of the Prince to the English throne, the lands and title became merged with the Crown again. On two occasions Welsh claimants to the title rose up in rebellion during this period, although neither ultimately succeeded.

Since the Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542, which formally incorporated all of Wales within the Kingdom of England, there has been no geographical or constitutional basis for describing any of the territory of Wales as a principality, although the term has occasionally been used in an informal sense to describe the country, and in relation to the honorary title of Prince of Wales.

Siege of Cardiff

The Siege of Cardiff was the last engagement of the Despenser wars. Edward II of England was forced to return here on 25 October 1326, coincidentally the same day that Isabella of France besieged it.

Welsh Tower houses

Welsh Tower Houses were fortified stone houses that were built between the early 14th and 15th centuries. They are related to Tower houses which occur in considerable numbers in Ireland and Scotland and to a much lesser extent in England. A map showing the distribution of Tower houses within the United Kingdom is given in Houses of the Welsh Countryside.

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