14th Tony Awards

The 14th Annual Tony Awards took place at the Astor Hotel Grand Ballroom on April 24, 1960, and was broadcast on local television station WCBS-TV in New York City. The Master of Ceremonies was Eddie Albert.[1]

14th Tony Awards
DateApril 24, 1960
LocationAstor Hotel
New York City, New York
Hosted byEddie Albert
Television/radio coverage
NetworkABC

Ceremony

Presenters: Jean Pierre Aumont, Lauren Bacall, Ray Bolger, Peggy Cass, Jo Van Fleet, Helen Hayes, Celeste Holm, Edward Albert Kenny, Sally Koriyo, Carol Lawrence, Vivien Leigh, Darren McGavin, Helen Menken, Robert Morse, Elliott Nugent, Laurie Peters, Christopher Plummer, Jason Robards. Music was by Meyer Davis and his Orchestra.[1]

The ceremony was attended by 1,200 at the Astor Hotel. Michael Kidd received his fifth Tony Award for choreography, Mary Martin won her third award as actress in a musical, and two musicals tied as best musical — Fiorello! and The Sound of Music.[2]

For the first time, several award categories (director, scenic designer) had separate awards for plays and musicals.[3]

Winners and nominees

Winners are in bold

Best Play Best Musical
Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical
Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical
Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Play Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical
Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical
Best Direction of a Play Best Direction of a Musical
Best Choreography Best Conductor and Musical Director
Best Scenic Design (Dramatic) Best Scenic Design (Musical)
Best Costume Design Best Stage Technician

Special awards

References

  1. ^ a b "Ceremonies 1960" tonyawards.com, accessed May 29, 2016
  2. ^ "'Miracle Worker' and Two Musicals Win Tonys: 'Fiorello!,' 'Sound of Music' Tie -- Mary Martin Gets 4th", The New York Times, April 25, 1960, p.33
  3. ^ "The Tony Awards - - Category by Category", tonyawards.com, accessed May 29, 2016

External links

15th Tony Awards

The 15th Annual Tony Awards took place on April 16, 1961, in the Waldorf-Astoria Grand Ballroom in New York City. The ceremony was broadcast on local television station WCBS-TV (Channel 2) in New York City. The Master of Ceremonies was Phil Silvers.

32nd Academy Awards

The 32nd Academy Awards ceremony, presented by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, was held on April 4, 1960 and took place at the RKO Pantages Theatre to honor the best films of 1959.

The epic drama Ben-Hur won 11 Oscars, breaking the record of nine set the year before by Gigi. Ben-Hur remained the most honored motion picture in Academy Award history until Titanic equaled the feat in 1997, followed by The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King in 2003.

Ben-Hur was the third film to win both Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor, a feat not repeated until Mystic River in 2004. Director William Wyler became the third (and most recent) person to win more than two Best Director awards (following Frank Capra and John Ford), as well as the only person to direct three Best Picture winners.

Everything's Coming up Roses

"Everything's Coming Up Roses" is a song from the 1959 Broadway musical Gypsy, with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and music by Jule Styne. Introduced in the musical's inaugural production by Ethel Merman, "Everything's Coming Up Roses" became one of Merman's signature songs.

According to Sammy Cahn, the song had its genesis in the 1947 musical High Button Shoes, for which he was the lyricist. Cahn wrote lyrics for a song entitled Betwixt and Between to be sung by a female character who can't decide between two men.

Jule Styne, who was that musical's composer, wrote music for it, but the director decided the song didn't fit well into the show and removed it. When composing Gypsy, Styne decided to re-use the music for what became "Everything's Coming Up Roses", with new lyrics by Sondheim. It took Sondheim a week to come up with the title, the composer recalling: "The point was to [coin] a phrase that sounded as if it had been in the language for years but was in fact invented for the show." (The similar phrase, "come up smelling like roses" has in fact been in general usage since the early 20th century.) The show's director Jerome Robbins response to Sondheim's lyric was: "Everything's coming up Rose's what?" prompting Sondheim's assurance that "if anybody else has that confusion - anybody connected with the production, in the audience, any of your relatives - I will change the title.""Everything's Coming up Roses" is performed at the end of the first act of Gypsy by stage mother Rose, who has just learned her daughter June has eloped and in effect left the vaudeville act Rose has devoted her life to without a star. Rose's plain-Jane daughter Louise and Rose's longtime fiancé Herbie are relieved, believing Rose will now marry Herbie and the three can lead a settled life: Rose's reaction in fact is to make Louise the object of her dubious star-making abilities. The title "Everything's Coming up Roses" is a pun: besides "roses" representing happiness, the title is referencing the possessive "Rose's" as in Rose's way or "Rose" as in Rose becoming a star herself, through her daughter.

Ethel Merman biographer Brian Kellow notes that while objectively "Everything's Coming up Roses" seems "a big, brassy paean to the power of positive thinking...done in the old, electric Merman style", within the context of the show "the song becomes a chilling illustration of blind ambition mixed with megalomania". Kellow quotes Stephen Sondheim to the effect that while Merman's comedic prowess was "nonpareil" as showcased in Gypsy's first act she lacked the dramatic precision to be fully effective as the play grew darker; thus, Sondheim says of "Everything's Coming up Roses": "I wrote a song of the type that [Merman] had sung all her life, like [the Anything Goes number] 'Blow, Gabriel, Blow', which only requires a trumpet-voiced affirmation." However Sondheim adds that Merman performed the song with an "intensity [which] came as a surprise."The emergence of "Everything's Coming up Roses" as a Broadway anthem was evidenced by the song's melody being utilized to open and close the 14th Tony Awards ceremony held April 24, 1960 (ironically Gypsy took none of its eight Tony nominations).In 1974 Ethel Merman appeared in a television advertisement singing new lyrics to the tune of "Everything's Coming Up Roses" to promote the Colgate-Palmolive dishwashing liquid Vel. That same year Merman recorded "Everything's Coming Up Roses" for her album Merman Sings Merman recorded with Stanley Black & the London Festival Orchestra. In 1979 Merman again recorded the song for her album Ethel Merman Disco Album. In her final film appearance, a cameo in the 1980 film Airplane! as shell-shocked soldier Lieutenant Hurwitz who believes he is Ethel Merman, Merman sings a few bars of "Everything's Coming Up Roses".

Other versions of "Everything's Coming Up Roses" include:

Annie Ross on her 1959 album Gypsy which comprises renditions of numbers from the stage musical Gypsy: the album features Buddy Bregman & his Orchestra

Rosemary Clooney in medley with "Clap Hands! Here Comes Charley!" on her 1960 album Clap Hands! Here Comes Rosie!: the lyrics of both songs were customized for "Rosie" Clooney and the track is accordingly entitled "Clap Hands! Here Comes Rosie!"/ "Everything's Coming Up Rosie"

Johnny Mathis on his 1960 album The Rhythms And Ballads Of Broadway

Bobby Rydell on his 1961 album Bobby Rydell Salutes the Great Ones

The Modernaires on their 1962 album Like Swung

Rosalind Russell in the film Gypsy (1962) – the track used in the film features Russell's own voice at the beginning with her "vocal double" Lisa Kirk taking over from the words: "Starting now" in the first verse.

Carol Burnett on her 1963 album Let Me Entertain You - Carol Burnett Sings

Tommy Steele on his 1964 album So This is Broadway

Shirley Bassey on her 1965 album Shirley Stops the Shows

Rosemary Squires on her 1965 album Something To Remember Me By (the track had been a 1962 single release)

Dorothy Squires on her This is My Life! concert album recorded October 8, 1966 in Llanelli WAL

Kay Medford on her 1969 album Kay Medford in Gypsy which comprises renditions of numbers from the stage musical Gypsy

Monica Lewis on her 1991 album Monica Lewis Swings Jule Styne

Bette Midler in the TV film version of Gypsy (1993).

Judy Kuhn on her 1995 album Just in Time - Judy Kuhn Sings Jule Styne

Ruthie Henshall on her 1996 album The Ruthie Henshall Album

Paul O'Grady performed this number live on his show in May 2005.

Liza Minnelli performed this on The Muppet Show.

Angela Lansbury, Tyne Daly, Bernadette Peters, and Patti LuPone all performed the song on Broadway in revivals of Gypsy in 1974, 1989, 2003, and 2008, respectively.

Bernadette Peters sings this song in episode 7 of the musical TV show, Smash.

Special Tony Award

The Special Tony Award category includes the Lifetime Achievement Award and Special Tony Award. These are non-competitive honorary awards, and the titles have changed over the years. The Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre is to "honor an individual for the body of his or her work." (The Tony Award for Best Special Theatrical Event was a competitive award, given from 2001 to 2009.) Another non-competitive Tony award is the Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre, to "recognize the achievements of individuals and organizations that do not fit into any of the competitive categories."

Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical

The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. The award has been given since 1948, but the nominees who did not win have only been publicly announced since 1956.

Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play

The Tony Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play is an honor presented at the Tony Awards, a ceremony established in 1947 as the Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre, to actors for quality leading roles in a Broadway play. The awards are named after Antoinette Perry, an American actress who died in 1946. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the Tony Award Productions, a joint venture of The Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing, to "honor the best performances and stage productions of the previous year." Despite the award first being presented in 1947, there were no nominees announced until 1956.

Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical

The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical is awarded to the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. The award has been given since 1948, but the nominees who did not win have only been publicly announced since 1956.

Tony Award for Best Choreography

The Tony Award for Best Choreography is awarded to acknowledge the contributions of choreographers in both musicals and plays. The award has been given since 1947, but nominees were not announced until 1956.

Tony Award for Best Conductor and Musical Director

The Tony Award for Best Conductor and Musical Director was awarded to acknowledge the contributions of conductors and musical directors in both musicals and operas. The award was first presented in 1948, and later discontinued after 1964.

Tony Award for Best Costume Design

These are the winners and nominees for the Tony Award for Best Costume Design. The award was first presented in 1947 and included both plays and musicals. In 1961, and since 2005 the category was divided into Costume Design in a Play and Costume Design in a Musical with each genre receiving its own award.

Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical

This is a list of winners and nominations for the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical. Prior to 1960, category for direction included plays and musicals.

Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play

The Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play has been given since 1960. Before 1960 there was only one award for both play direction and musical direction, then in 1960 the award was split into two categories: Dramatic and Musical. In 1976 the Dramatic category was renamed to Play. For pre-1960 direction awards please reference Tony Award for Best Director.

Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical

This is a list of the winners and nominations of Tony Award for the Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical. It is the equivalent to the Best Supporting Actor award at the Academy Awards. The award has been given since 1947, but the nominees who did not win have only been publicly announced since 1956.

Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical

The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical has been presented since 1950. The award was not given at the first three Tony Award ceremonies. Nominees were not announced publicly until 1956.

Tony Award for Best Musical

The Tony Awards are yearly awards that recognize achievement in live Broadway theatre. The award for Best Musical is one of the ceremony's longest-standing awards, having been presented each year since 1949. The award goes to the producers of the winning musical. A musical is eligible for consideration in a given year if it has not previously been produced on Broadway and is not "determined... to be a 'classic' or in the historical or popular repertoire."

Best Musical is the final award presented at the Tony Awards ceremony. Excerpts from the musicals that are nominated for this award are usually performed during the ceremony before this award is presented.

This is a list of winners and nominations for the Tony Award for Best Musical.

Tony Award for Best Play

The Tony Award for Best Play (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theatre, including musical theatre, honoring productions on Broadway in New York City. There was no award in the Tonys' first year. All My Sons has been incorrectly categorized as the Best Play of 1947, but it won the Best Author award for Arthur Miller. The following year Mister Roberts received the first Tony Award as Best Play. The award goes to the authors and the producers of the play.

Tony Award for Best Scenic Design in a Musical

Tony Award for Best Scenic Design in a Musical is an award for outstanding set design of a musical. The award was first presented in 1960 after the category of Best Scenic Design was divided into Scenic Design in a Play and Scenic Design in a Musical with each genre receiving its own award.

Tony Award for Best Scenic Design in a Play

Tony Award for Best Scenic Design in a Play is an award for outstanding set design of a play. The award was first presented in 1960 after the category of Best Scenic Design was divided into Scenic Design in a Play and Scenic Design in a Musical with each genre receiving its own award.

Tony Award for Best Stage Technician

The Tony Award for Best Stage Technician was awarded to acknowledge the contributions of stage technicians in both musicals and plays. The award was first given in 1948 and last presented in 1963.

Play
Musical
Special (non-competitive)
Retired
Ceremonies

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