14th Academy Awards

The 14th Academy Awards honored film achievements in 1941 and was held in the Biltmore Bowl at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California. The ceremony is now considered notable, in retrospect, as the year in which Citizen Kane failed to win Best Picture, which instead was awarded to John Ford's How Green Was My Valley. Ford won his third award for Best Director, becoming the second to accomplish three wins in that category, and the first to win in consecutive years (having won for The Grapes of Wrath the previous year).

Most public attention was focused on the Best Actress race between sibling rivals Joan Fontaine in Alfred Hitchcock’s Suspicion and Olivia de Havilland for Hold Back the Dawn. Fontaine’s victory was the only time a performer won for a role in a Hitchcock film.

This was also the first year in which documentaries were included. The first Oscar for a documentary was awarded to Churchill's Island.

The Little Foxes established a new high of nine nominations without winning a single Oscar. Its mark was matched by Peyton Place in 1957, and exceeded by The Turning Point and The Color Purple, both of which received 11 nominations without a win. Citizen Kane, often later designated as the greatest film ever made in a number of polls, was nominated for nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture, but won only one, for Best Original Screenplay.

A portion of the ceremony was broadcast by CBS Radio.[1]

14th Academy Awards
DateFebruary 26, 1942
SiteBiltmore Bowl, Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, California, USA
Hosted byBob Hope
Highlights
Best PictureHow Green Was My Valley
Most awardsHow Green Was My Valley (5)
Most nominationsSergeant York (11)

Awards

Nominations were announced on February 6, 1942. Winners are listed first, highlighted in boldface, and marked with a dagger symbol (double-dagger).[2]

Gary Cooper and Joan Fontaine holding their Oscars at Academy Awards after party, 1942
Gary Cooper and Joan Fontaine holding their Oscars at an Academy Awards after party in 1942.

Academy Honorary Award

Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

Multiple nominations and awards

These films had multiple nominations:

The following films received multiple awards.

See also

References

  1. ^ Dunning, John (1998). On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 4. ISBN 978-0-19-507678-3.
  2. ^ "The 14th Academy Awards (1942) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-13.
Alive in the Deep

Alive in the Deep is a 1941 American short documentary film directed by Stacy Woodard and Horace Woodard. It was nominated for an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Two-Reel).

Baby Mine (Dumbo song)

"Baby Mine" is a song from the 1941 Disney animated feature Dumbo. The music is by Frank Churchill, with lyrics by Ned Washington. Betty Noyes recorded the vocals for the original film version. In the film, Dumbo's mother, Mrs. Jumbo, an elephant locked in a circus wagon, cradles her baby Dumbo with her trunk while this lullaby is sung. It is also the last appearance of the circus animals.

The song was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 14th Academy Awards in 1942. It is also listed on AFI's "100 Years... 100 Songs" as one of America's greatest film songs.

Beauty and the Beach (film)

Beauty and the Beach is a 1941 American short musical film directed by Leslie M. Roush. It was nominated for an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (One-Reel).

Darrell Ware

Darrell Ware (1906-1944) was an American screenwriter and film producer. Ware and Karl Tunberg were nominees for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay at the 14th Academy Awards for their film Tall, Dark, and Handsome.Ware wrote and contributed to the writing of several films starring Shirley Temple while he was under contract to 20th Century Fox. Ware joined Paramount Studios in 1942, where he wrote for film stars including Bing Crosby, Alan Ladd, and Paulette Goddard.

Down on the Farm (1941 film)

Down on the Farm is a 1941 American short animated film directed by Tex Avery as the first entry in the Speaking of Animals short film series which Avery created for Paramount Pictures. It was nominated for an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (One-Reel).

Forbidden Passage

Forbidden Passage is a 1941 American short crime film directed by Fred Zinnemann. It was nominated for an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Two-Reel).

Forty Boys and a Song

Forty Boys and a Song is a 1941 American short documentary film about the Robert Mitchell Boys Choir. Directed by Irving Allen, it was nominated for an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (One-Reel).

Harry Hallenberger

Harry Hallenberger (October 24, 1877 – March 4, 1954) was an American cinematographer who was nominated at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Cinematography-Color, along with Ray Rennahan. This was for the film Louisiana Purchase.

John D. Hall (sound engineer)

John D. Hall was an American sound engineer. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Special Effects on the film The Invisible Woman at the 14th Academy Awards.

Kukan

Kukan (1941) is a documentary film co-produced by Li Ling-Ai and Rey Scott and directed by Rey Scott about the Chinese resistance to Japanese aggression during the early part of World War II (see Second Sino-Japanese War). Though Ling-Ai was a co-producer and sponsor of the film, she was credited as a "technical advisor" in its credits.The film, originally subtitled The Secret of Unconquerable China, was distributed in 16mm by Adventure Films and given an Honorary Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards. United Artists acquired the film for broader distribution in April 1942 and renamed it KUKAN: The Battle Cry of China before releasing it in 35mm in August of the same year. Considered lost for many years, a print was located and partially restored at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Robin Lung produced a documentary about Li Ling-Ai, named Finding Kukan (2016). The entire film is currently available as an extra on the DVD for Finding Kukan.

Lend a Paw

Lend a Paw is an animated short film produced in Technicolor by Walt Disney Productions, distributed by RKO Radio Pictures and released to theaters on October 3, 1941. Lend a Paw was directed by Clyde Geronimi and features original music by Leigh Harline. George Nicholas, Kenneth Muse, Nick Nichols, William Sturm, Eric Gurney, Norman Tate, Chick Otterstrom, Morey Reden, and Emery Hawkins animated the film. The voice cast includes Walt Disney as Mickey and Pinto Colvig as Pluto.In the cartoon, which was largely a remake of the 1933 short Mickey's Pal Pluto, Pluto saves the life of a kitten, and later feels jealous towards the kitten after Mickey Mouse takes the kitten in. The film won the Oscar for Best Animated Short Film at the 14th Academy Awards in 1942.

Main Street on the March!

Main Street on the March! is a 1941 American short historical film directed by Edward Cahn. It won an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Two-Reel). The 20-minute film gives a brief history of events in Europe and the U.S. in the year and a half leading up to the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Mercy Island

Mercy Island is a 1941 American drama that was nominated at the 14th Academy Awards, held in 1941, for Best Score of a Dramatic Picture-which Walter Scharf and Cy Feuer received nominations for.

Of Pups and Puzzles

Of Pups and Puzzles is a 1941 American short documentary film directed by George Sidney. It won an Oscar at the 14th Academy Awards, held in 1942, for Best Short Subject (One-Reel).

Sagebrush and Silver

Sagebrush and Silver is a 1941 American short documentary film directed by Frank Hurley. It was nominated for an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (One-Reel).

The Gay Parisian

The Gay Parisian is an American short film produced in 1941 by Warner Bros. and directed by Jean Negulesco. The film is a screen adaptation, in Technicolor, of the 1938 ballet Gaîté Parisienne, choreographed by Léonide Massine to music by Jacques Offenbach. It was nominated for an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Two-Reel).

The Tanks Are Coming (1941 film)

The Tanks Are Coming is a 1941 American Technicolor short film. It is primarily a recruitment film, but can also be regarded as a propaganda film or a documentary with some light relief. Like Dive Bomber (of the same year) it is a pre-Pearl Harbor movie, made with the co-operation of the relevant branch of the US armed forces, showing off US military material to the US public, in lavish Technicolor. This material is shown in motion, both on the road and in the field; training equipment and methods are also featured.

It was nominated for an Academy Award at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Two-Reel).

This Woman is Mine

This Woman is Mine is a 1941 American adventure film directed by Frank Lloyd and starring Franchot Tone, John Carroll and Walter Brennan. It was nominated at the 14th Academy Awards for Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic Picture; the nomination was for Richard Hageman.

William Holmes (film editor)

William Holmes (February 23, 1904 – February 2, 1978) was an American film editor. He won an Oscar for Best Film Editing at the 14th Academy Awards for his work on the film Sergeant York.He worked on 56 different films from 1925 to 1942.

Awards of Merit
Special awards
Former awards
Ceremonies‡
Footnote

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.