1307

Year 1307 (MCCCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1307 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1307
MCCCVII
Ab urbe condita2060
Armenian calendar756
ԹՎ ՉԾԶ
Assyrian calendar6057
Balinese saka calendar1228–1229
Bengali calendar714
Berber calendar2257
English Regnal year35 Edw. 1 – 1 Edw. 2
Buddhist calendar1851
Burmese calendar669
Byzantine calendar6815–6816
Chinese calendar丙午(Fire Horse)
4003 or 3943
    — to —
丁未年 (Fire Goat)
4004 or 3944
Coptic calendar1023–1024
Discordian calendar2473
Ethiopian calendar1299–1300
Hebrew calendar5067–5068
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1363–1364
 - Shaka Samvat1228–1229
 - Kali Yuga4407–4408
Holocene calendar11307
Igbo calendar307–308
Iranian calendar685–686
Islamic calendar706–707
Japanese calendarTokuji 2
(徳治2年)
Javanese calendar1218–1219
Julian calendar1307
MCCCVII
Korean calendar3640
Minguo calendar605 before ROC
民前605年
Nanakshahi calendar−161
Thai solar calendar1849–1850
Tibetan calendar阳火马年
(male Fire-Horse)
1433 or 1052 or 280
    — to —
阴火羊年
(female Fire-Goat)
1434 or 1053 or 281

Events

January–December

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

1300s in England

Events from the 1300s in England.

1307 in Scotland

Events from the year 1307 in the Kingdom of Scotland.

14th century BC

The 14th century BC is a century which lasted from the year 1400 BC until 1301 BC.

Battle of Glen Trool

The Battle of Glen Trool was a minor engagement in the First War of Scottish Independence, fought in April 1307. Glen Trool is a narrow glen in the Southern Uplands of Galloway, Scotland. Loch Trool is aligned on an east-west axis and is flanked on both sides by steep rising hills, making it ideal for an ambush. The battlefield is currently under research to be inventoried and protected by Historic Scotland under the Scottish Historical Environment Policy of 2009.Robert Bruce had been involved in the murder of John "the Red" Comyn, a leading rival, and one of the most powerful men in Scotland, the previous year 1306. This led to a bitter civil war between the Bruce's faction and the Comyns and their allies, notably Edward I.

Battle of Loch Ryan

The Battle of Loch Ryan was a battle fought on 9/10 February 1307 during the Scottish Wars of Independence near Stranraer on Loch Ryan, Galloway, Scotland.

King Robert I of Scotland's invasion of his ancestral lands in Annandale and Carrick began in 1307. The Annandale and Galloway invasion force was led by his brothers Alexander de Brus and Thomas de Brus, Malcolm McQuillan, Lord of Kintyre, an Irish sub king and Sir Reginald de Crawford. The force consisted of 1000 men and eighteen galleys. They sailed into Loch Ryan and landed near Stranraer. The invasion force was quickly overwhelmed by local forces, led by Dungal MacDouall, who was a supporter of the Balliols, Comyns and King Edward I of England, and only two galleys escaped. All the leaders were captured. Dungal MacDouall, summarily executed the Irish sub king and Malcolm McQuillan, Lord of Kintyre. Alexander, Thomas and Reginald de Crawford were sent to Carlisle, England, where they were executed. The heads of McQuillan and two Irish chiefs were sent to King Edward I.

Battle of Loudoun Hill

The Battle of Loudoun Hill was fought in May 1307 between a Scots force led by Robert the Bruce and the English commanded by Aymer de Valence. It took place beneath Loudoun Hill, in Ayrshire, and ended in a victory for Bruce. It was Bruce's first major military victory. The battlefield is currently under research to be included in the Inventory of Historic Battlefields in Scotland and protected by Historic Scotland under the Scottish Historical Environment Policy of 2009.

Battle of Slioch

The Battle of Slioch was a minor skirmish in the First War of Scottish Independence. Although the encounter was inconclusive, the domestic enemies of the Scottish King Robert Bruce were unable to stop him from consolidating his rule over Scotland.

Battle of Turnberry

The Battle of Turnberry was a battle fought in February 1307 during the Scottish Wars of Independence near Turnberry, Ayrshire, Scotland.

King Robert I of Scotland's invasion of his ancestral lands in Annandale and Carrick began in 1307. The Carrick invasion force was led by Robert, his brother Edward de Brus, James Douglas, Lord of Douglas and Robert Boyd. The force comprised thirty three galleys. They sailed to Turnberry and landed near Turnberry Castle. The invasion force quickly overwhelmed the English forces of Henry de Percy, 1st Baron Percy encamped around Turnberry Castle, but failed to take the castle.

Henry de Percy was forced to leave the castle after this defeat.

Duwa

Duwa (died 1307), also known as Du'a, was khan of the Chagatai Khanate (1282–1307). He was the second son of Baraq. He was the longest reigning monarch of the Chagatayid Khanate and accepted the nominal supremacy of the Yuan dynasty as Great Khan before his death. Under his rule, the Chagatai Khanate reached its peak.

Earl of Cornwall

The title of Earl of Cornwall was created several times in the Peerage of England before 1337, when it was superseded by the title Duke of Cornwall, which became attached to heirs-apparent to the throne.

Edward I of England

Edward I (17/18 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Latin: Malleus Scotorum), was King of England from 1272 to 1307. Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford. After reconciliation with his father, however, he remained loyal throughout the subsequent armed conflict, known as the Second Barons' War. After the Battle of Lewes, Edward was hostage to the rebellious barons, but escaped after a few months and joined the fight against Simon de Montfort. Montfort was defeated at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, and within two years the rebellion was extinguished. With England pacified, Edward joined the Ninth Crusade to the Holy Land. The crusade accomplished little, and Edward was on his way home in 1272 when he was informed that his father had died. Making a slow return, he reached England in 1274 and was crowned at Westminster Abbey on 19 August.

He spent much of his reign reforming royal administration and common law. Through an extensive legal inquiry, Edward investigated the tenure of various feudal liberties, while the law was reformed through a series of statutes regulating criminal and property law. Increasingly, however, Edward's attention was drawn towards military affairs. After suppressing a minor rebellion in Wales in 1276–77, Edward responded to a second rebellion in 1282–83 with a full-scale war of conquest. After a successful campaign, Edward subjected Wales to English rule, built a series of castles and towns in the countryside and settled them with English people. Next, his efforts were directed towards Scotland. Initially invited to arbitrate a succession dispute, Edward claimed feudal suzerainty over the kingdom. The war that followed continued after Edward's death, even though the English seemed victorious at several points. Simultaneously, Edward I found himself at war with France (a Scottish ally) after the French king Philip IV had confiscated the duchy of Aquitaine, which until then had been held in personal union with the Kingdom of England. Although Edward recovered his duchy, this conflict relieved English military pressure against Scotland. At the same time there were problems at home. In the mid-1290s, extensive military campaigns required high levels of taxation, and Edward met with both lay and ecclesiastical opposition. These crises were initially averted, but issues remained unsettled. When the King died in 1307, he left to his son Edward II an ongoing war with Scotland and many financial and political problems.

Edward I was a tall man for his era, hence the nickname "Longshanks". He was temperamental, and this, along with his height, made him an intimidating man, and he often instilled fear in his contemporaries. Nevertheless, he held the respect of his subjects for the way he embodied the medieval ideal of kingship, as a soldier, an administrator and a man of faith. Modern historians are divided on their assessment of Edward I: while some have praised him for his contribution to the law and administration, others have criticised him for his uncompromising attitude towards his nobility. Currently, Edward I is credited with many accomplishments during his reign, including restoring royal authority after the reign of Henry III, establishing Parliament as a permanent institution and thereby also a functional system for raising taxes, and reforming the law through statutes. At the same time, he is also often criticised for other actions, such as his brutal conduct towards the Welsh and Scots, and issuing the Edict of Expulsion in 1290, by which the Jews were expelled from England. The Edict remained in effect for the rest of the Middle Ages, and it was over 350 years until it was formally overturned under Oliver Cromwell in 1657.

German submarine U-1307

German submarine U-1307 was a Type VIIC/41 U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

She was ordered on 1 August 1942, and was laid down on 2 December 1943, at Flensburger Schiffbau-Gesellschaft, Flensburg, as yard number 500. She was launched on 29 September 1944, and commissioned under the command of Oberleutnant zur See Hans Buscher on 17 November 1944.

Leo III, King of Armenia

Leo III (or Leon III) Armenian: Լեիոն Գ, Levon III) (occasionally numbered Leo IV; (1289–1307) was a young king of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, ruling from 1303 or 1305 to 1307, along with his uncle Hethum II. A member of the Hethumid dynasty, he was the son of Thoros III of Armenia and Margaret of Lusignan, who was the daughter of King Hugh III of Cyprus.

In 1303, while still a minor, he was crowned King of Armenia upon the retirement of his uncle Hethum II, who became Regent. Cilician Armenia at the time was in a volatile situation, maintaining a fragile relationship as a vassal state of the Mongol Empire, while defending from attacks by the Muslim Mamluks from the south. The throne of Armenia had changed hands multiple times during Leo's brief lifetime, being held variously by his uncle Hethum II in 1295, passed peacefully to his father Thoros III in 1296, then usurped by another uncle Sempad, who was usurped by his brother Constantine III of Armenia, who himself was deposed by his brother Hethum II in 1299. Thoros III having been killed in 1298, Hethum then passed the crown to Thoros's son, Leo, in 1303.

In 1305, Hethum and Leo led the Armenian army to defeat a Mamluk raiding force at Bagras.

On November 17, 1307, Leo and Hethum were murdered with their retinue while visiting the Mongol general Bilarghu at Anazarva. Bilarghu, a Mongol who had converted to Islam, had sought to build a mosque in the capital city of Sis, but Hethum had blocked the move and complained to the leader of the Mongol Ilkhanate, Oljeitu. Bilarghu invited Hethum, Leo, and many other Armenia nobles to a meeting at Anazarva, presumably for discussions, but then his forces attacked, and all of the nobles were killed. Bilarghu was later executed by the Mongol ilkhan for his actions.

Leo was succeeded as king by another of his uncles, Oshin.

Oak Island

Oak Island is a 57-hectare (140-acre) privately owned island in Lunenburg County on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada. The tree-covered island is one of about 360 small islands in Mahone Bay and rises to a maximum of 11 metres (36 feet) above sea level. The island is located 200 metres (660 feet) from shore and connected to the mainland by a causeway and gate. The nearest community is the rural community of Western Shore which faces the island, while the nearest village is Chester. The island is best known for various theories about possible buried treasure or historical artifacts, and the associated exploration.

Simca 1307

The Simca 1307 was a large family car produced by Chrysler Europe and latterly PSA Peugeot Citröen from 1975 to 1986.

Codenamed C6 in development the car was styled in the United Kingdom by Roy Axe and his team at Whitley and the car was engineered by Simca at Poissy in France.

A modern, front-wheel drive hatchback, it was one of the earliest cars in that class, along with the Volkswagen Passat, and became the 1976 European Car of the Year. It had been in development since 1972.The model was sold under a variety of names, including Simca 1308 and 1309 models (with larger engines), Chrysler Alpine (UK, Ireland and New Zealand), Dodge Alpine (Colombia), Chrysler 150 (Spanish market), and later Talbot 1510 / Talbot Alpine / Talbot 150 (a facelifted version launched by PSA after its takeover of Chrysler Europe) and Talbot Solara (the saloon version).

Temür Khan

Temür Öljeytü Khan (Mongolian: Өлзийт Төмөр, translit. Ölziit Tömör; Middle Mongolian: ᠥᠯᠵᠡᠶᠢᠲᠦ ᠲᠡᠮᠦᠷ, Öljeyitü Temür), born Temür (also spelled Timur, Mongolian: Төмөр, October 15, 1265 – February 10, 1307), also known by the temple name Chengzong (Emperor Chengzong of Yuan; Chinese: 元成宗; pinyin: Yuán Chéngzōng; Wade–Giles: Yüan2 Ch'eng2-tsung1) was the second emperor of the Yuan dynasty, ruling from May 10, 1294 to February 10, 1307. Apart from Emperor of China, he is considered as the sixth Great Khan of the Mongol Empire or Mongols, although it was only nominal due to the division of the empire. He was an able ruler of the Yuan, and his reign established the patterns of power for the next few decades. His name means "blessed iron Khan" in the Mongolian language.

Temür was a son of the Crown Prince Zhenjin (真金) and the grandson of Kublai Khan. During his rule, the Tran, Pagan, and Champa dynasties and western khanates of the Mongol Empire accepted his supremacy.

The Tabard

The Tabard was a historic inn that stood on the east side of Borough High Street in Southwark. The hostelry was established in 1307 and stood on the ancient thoroughfare that led south from London Bridge to Canterbury and Dover. It was built for the Abbot of Hyde who purchased the land to construct a place to stay for himself and his ecclesiastical brethren when on business in London.

The Tabard was also famous for accommodating people who made the pilgrimage to the Shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral, and Geoffrey Chaucer mentions it in his 14th Century work The Canterbury Tales.

USS Conquest (AM-488)

USS Conquest (MSO-488) was an Aggressive-class minesweeper in the United States Navy.

Conquest was laid down by the J.M. Martinac Shipbuilding Corp. of Tacoma, Washington on 26 March 1953 as AM-488, launched on 20 March 1954 by Mrs. C. D. Henderson. She was reclassified MSO-488 on 7 February 1955, and commissioned on 8 July 1955 with Lieutenant E. L. Davis in command.

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