11th century BC

The 11th century BC comprises all years from 1100 BC to 1001 BC. Although many human societies were literate in this period, some of the individuals mentioned below may be apocryphal rather than historically accurate.

Millennium: 2nd millennium BC
Centuries:
Timelines:
State leaders:
Decades:
Categories: Births – Deaths
Establishments – Disestablishments

Events

Julius Kronberg David och Saul 1885
David and Saul (1885) by Julius Kronberg. The two men are considered the first Kings of the United Monarchy of Israel

Sovereign States

See: List of sovereign states in the 11th century BC.

Ahijah

This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Easton, Matthew George (1897). "Ahijah" . Easton's Bible Dictionary (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons.Ahijah (Hebrew: אֲחִיָּה‎ ’Ǎḥîyāh, "brother of Yah"; Latin and Douay-Rheims: Ahias) is a name of several Biblical individuals:

Ahijah the Shilonite, the Biblical prophet who divided the Kingdoms of Israel and Judah.

One of the sons of Bela (1 Chr. 8:7, RV). In AV (KJV) called "Ahiah."

One of the five sons of Jerahmeel, who was great-grandson of Judah (1 Chr. 2:25).

A Pelonite, one of David's heroes (1 Chr. 11:36); called also Eliam (2 Sam. 23:34).

A Levite having charge of the sacred treasury in the temple (1 Chr. 26:20).

One of Solomon's secretaries (1 Kings 4:3).

Son of Ahitub (1 Sam. 14:3, 18), Ichabod's brother; the same probably as Ahimelech, who was High Priest at Nob in the reign of Saul (1 Sam. 22:11) and at Shiloh, where the Tabernacle was set up. Some, however, suppose that Ahimelech was the brother of Ahijah, and that they both officiated as high priests, Ahijah at Gibeah or Kirjath-jearim, and Ahimelech at Nob.

Father of King Baasha of Israel

Ahimelech

Ahimelech (Hebrew: אֲחִימֶ֫לֶך‎ ’Ăḥîmeleḵ, "brother of a king"), the son of Ahitub and father of Abiathar (1 Samuel 22:20-23), but described as the son of Abiathar in 2 Samuel 8:17 and in four places in 1 Chronicles. He descended from Aaron's son Ithamar and the High Priest of Israel Eli. In 1 Chronicles 18:16 his name is Abimelech according to the Masoretic Text, and is probably the same as Ahiah (1 Samuel 14:3, 18).

Amenemnisu

Neferkare Amenemnisu was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 21st Dynasty.

Amenemope (pharaoh)

Usermaatre Amenemope was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 21st Dynasty.

Asharid-apal-Ekur

Ašarēd-apil-Ekur, inscribed ma-šá-rid-A-É.KUR or mSAG.KAL-DUMU.UŠ-É.KUR and variants, meaning “the heir of the Ekur is foremost,” was the son and successor of Tukultī-apil-Ešarra I as king of Assyria, reigning for just two years, 1076/5–1074 BC, during the turmoil that engulfed the end of that lengthy reign, and he was the 88th king to appear on the Assyrian King List. His reign marked the elevation of the office of ummânu, “royal scribe,” and he was the first to have this recorded next to the king’s name on the Synchronistic King List, possibly identifying the contemporary redactor of this list.

Ashur-rabi II

Aššur-rabi II, inscribed maš-šur-GAL-bi, "(the god) Aššur is great," was king of Assyria 1012–972 BC. Despite his lengthy reign (41 years), one of the longest of the Assyrian monarchs, his tenure seems to have been an unhappy one judging by the scanty and laconic references to his setbacks from later sources.

Ashurnasirpal I

Aššur-nāṣir-apli I, inscribed maš-šur-PAB-A, “the god Aššur is the protector of the heir,” was the king of Assyria, 1049–1031 BC, and the 92nd to appear on the Assyrian Kinglist. He was the son and successor of Šamši-Adad IV, and he ruled for 19 years during a troubled period of Assyrian history, marked by famine and war with nomads from the deserts to the west. He is best known for his penitential prayer to Ištar of Nineveh.

Chen (state)

Chen (陳) was a Zhou dynasty vassal state of ancient China. Its capital was Wanqiu, in present-day Huaiyang County in the plains of eastern Henan province.

According to tradition, the royal family of Chen were descendants of the legendary sage king Emperor Shun. After the conquest of the Shang dynasty in 1046/45 BC, King Wu of Zhou enfeoffed his son-in-law Gui Man, a descendant of Shun, at Chen, and Man became known as Duke Hu of Chen.

Chen later became a satellite state of Chu, fighting as an ally of Chu at the Battle of Chengpu. It was finally annexed by Chu in 479 BC. Many people of Chen then took the name of their former country as their family name, and account for the majority of Chinese people with the family name Chen today. After the destruction of the old Chu capital at Ying, Chen became the Chu capital for a period.

Eli (biblical figure)

Eli was, according to the Books of Samuel, a High Priest of Shiloh. When Hannah came to Shiloh to pray for a son, Eli initially accused her of drunkenness, but when she protested her innocence, Eli wished her well. Hannah's eventual child, Samuel, was raised by Eli in the tabernacle. When Eli failed to rein in the abusive behavior of his sons, Yahweh promised to punish his family, resulting eventually in the death of Eli and his sons. Later biblical passages mention the fortunes of several of his descendants, and he figures prominently in Samaritan tradition.

Ionic Greek

Ionic Greek was a subdialect of the Attic–Ionic or Eastern dialect group of Ancient Greek.

Ish-bosheth

Ish-bosheth (Hebrew: אִֽישְׁבֹּשֶׁת, Ishboshet), also called Eshbaal (אֶשְׁבַּעַל, Eshbaal; also Ashbaal or Ishbaal), was one of the four sons of King Saul and the second king over the Kingdom of Israel, after the death of his father and three brothers at the Battle of Mount Gilboa.

List of political entities in the 11th century BC

Political entities in the 12th century BC – Political entities in the 10th century BC – Political entities by century

This is a list of political entities in the 11th century BC (1100–1001 BC).

Psusennes I

Psusennes I (Ancient Egyptian: pꜣ-sbꜣ-ḫꜥ-n-njwt; Greek Ψουσέννης) was the third pharaoh of the 21st Dynasty who ruled from Tanis between 1047–1001 BC. Psusennes is the Greek version of his original name Pasibkhanu or Pasebakhaenniut (in reconstructed Late Egyptian: /pəsiwʃeʕənneːʔə/), which means "The Star Appearing in the City" while his throne name, Akheperre Setepenamun, translates as "Great are the Manifestations of Ra, chosen of Amun." He was the son of Pinedjem I and Henuttawy, Ramesses XI's daughter by Tentamun. He married his sister Mutnedjmet.

Qi (state)

Qi was a state of the Zhou dynasty-era in ancient China, variously reckoned as a march, duchy, and independent kingdom. Its capital was Yingqiu, located within present-day Linzi in Shandong.

Qi was founded shortly after the Zhou overthrow of Shang in the 11th century BC. Its first marquis was Jiang Ziya, minister of King Wen and a legendary figure in Chinese culture. His family ruled Qi for several centuries before it was replaced by the Tian family in 386 BC. In 221 BC, Qi was the final major state annexed by Qin during its unification of China.

Queen Gwendolen

Queen Gwendolen, also known as Gwendolin, or Gwendolyn (Latin: Guendoloēna) was a legendary ruler of ancient Britain. She is said to have been queen during the 11th century BC.

As told by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his pseudohistorical account Historia Regum Britanniae, she was the repudiated queen of King Locrinus until she defeated her husband in battle at the River Stour. This river was the dividing line between Cornwall and Loegria, two key locations in ancient Britain. After defeating the king, she took on the leadership of the Britons, becoming their first queen regnant.

Shang dynasty

The Shang dynasty (Chinese: 商朝; pinyin: Shāngcháo), also historically known as the Yin dynasty (殷代; Yīndài), was a Chinese dynasty that ruled in the Lower Yellow River Valley in the second millennium BC, succeeding the semi-mythical Xia dynasty and followed by the Zhou dynasty. The classic account of the Shang comes from texts such as the Book of Documents, Bamboo Annals and Records of the Grand Historian. According to the traditional chronology based on calculations made approximately 2,000 years ago by Liu Xin, the Shang ruled from 1766 to 1122 BC, but according to the chronology based upon the "current text" of Bamboo Annals, they ruled from 1556 to 1046 BC. The state-sponsored Xia–Shang–Zhou Chronology Project dated them from c. 1600 to 1046 BC based on the carbon 14 dates of the Erligang site.

The Shang dynasty is the earliest dynasty of traditional Chinese history firmly supported by archaeological evidence. Excavation at the Ruins of Yin (near modern-day Anyang), which has been identified as the last Shang capital, uncovered eleven major royal tombs and the foundations of palaces and ritual sites, containing weapons of war and remains from both animal and human sacrifices. Tens of thousands of bronze, jade, stone, bone, and ceramic artifacts have been found.

The Anyang site has yielded the earliest known body of Chinese writing, mostly divinations inscribed on oracle bones – turtle shells, ox scapulae, or other bones. More than 20,000 were discovered in the initial scientific excavations during the 1920s and 1930s, and over four times as many have been found since. The inscriptions provide critical insight into many topics from the politics, economy, and religious practices to the art and medicine of this early stage of Chinese civilization.

Smendes

For other bearers of the name see Smendes (disambiguation).Hedjkheperre Setepenre Smendes was the founder of the Twenty-first dynasty of Egypt and succeeded to the throne after burying Ramesses XI in Lower Egypt – territory which he controlled. His Egyptian nomen or birth name was actually Nesbanebdjed meaning "He of the Ram, Lord of Mendes", but it was translated into Greek as Smendes by later classical writers such as Josephus and Sextus Africanus. While Smendes' precise origins remain a mystery, he is thought to have been a powerful governor in Lower Egypt during the Renaissance era of Ramesses XI and his base of power was Tanis.

Third Intermediate Period of Egypt

The Third Intermediate Period of Ancient Egypt began with the death of Pharaoh Ramesses XI in 1070 BC, which ended the New Kingdom, and was eventually followed by the Late Period. Various points are offered as the beginning for the latter era, though it is most often regarded as dating from the foundation of the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty by Psamtik I in 664 BC, following the expulsion of the Nubian Kushite rulers of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty by the Assyrians under King Assurbanipal.

The period was one of decline and political instability, coinciding with the Late Bronze Age collapse of civilizations in the Near East and Eastern Mediterranean (including the Greek Dark Ages). It was marked by division of the state for much of the period and conquest and rule by foreigners.

Twenty-first Dynasty of Egypt

The Twenty-first Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXI, alternatively 21st Dynasty or Dynasty 21) is usually classified as the first Dynasty of the Ancient Egyptian Third Intermediate Period, lasting from 1069 BC to 945 BC.

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