116th United States Congress

The 116th United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. It convened in Washington, D.C. on January 3, 2019 and will end on January 3, 2021, during the third and fourth years of Donald Trump's presidency. Senators elected to regular terms in 2014 are finishing their terms in this Congress and House seats were apportioned based on the 2010 Census.

In the November 2018 midterm elections, the Democratic Party won a new majority in the House, while the Republican Party increased its majority in the Senate. Consequently, this is the first split Congress since the 113th (2013–2015), and the first Republican Senate/Democrat House split since the 99th (1985–1987). This Congress is considered to be the most diverse ever elected, and the youngest in the past three cycles.[1]

116th United States Congress
115th ←
→ 117th
U.S. Capitol Snow 2018 (32026277508)
January 3, 2019 – January 3, 2021
Senate PresidentMike Pence (R)
Senate President pro temChuck Grassley (R)
House SpeakerNancy Pelosi (D)
Members100 senators
435 members of the House
6 non-voting delegates
Senate MajorityRepublican
House MajorityDemocratic
Sessions
1st: January 3, 2019 – TBD
2nd: TBD – TBD
Opening Day ceremony for the 116th United States Congress on the House Floor
Opening day proceedings from the Senate

Major events

Major legislation

Enacted

Proposed

Vetoed

(With official titles)

Party summary

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

Senate

US Senate 45-2-53

Current (since January 8, 2019)

US Senate 45-2-52 (1V)

January 3, 2019 – January 8, 2019

Affiliation Party
(shading indicates majority caucus)
Total Vacant
Democratic Independent Republican
End of previous Congress 47 2 50 99 1
Begin (January 3, 2019) 45 2 52 99 1
January 8, 2019[a] 53 100 0
Latest voting share 47.0% 53.0%

House of Representatives

US House 235-198 (2V)

Current (since May 21, 2019)

US House 235-197 (3V)

February 10, 2019 – May 21, 2019

US House 235-199 (1V)

January 3, 2019 – January 23, 2019

US House 235-198 (2V)

January 23, 2019 – February 10, 2019

Affiliation Party
(shading indicates majority caucus)
Total Vacant
Democratic Independent Republican
End of previous Congress 196 0 236 432 3
Begin (January 3, 2019)[b] 235 0 199 434 1
January 23, 2019[c] 198 433 2
February 10, 2019[d] 197 432 3
May 21, 2019[c] 198 433 2
Latest voting share 54.3% 0.0% 45.7%  
Non-voting members 3 1 2 6 0

Leadership

Senate

Majority (Republican) Leadership

Minority (Democratic) Leadership

House of Representatives

Majority (Democratic) Leadership

Minority (Republican) Leadership

Demographics

Most members of this Congress are Christian (88.2%), with approximately half being Protestant and 30.5% being Catholic. Jewish membership is 6.4%, the highest percentage in American history. Other religions represented include Buddhism, Islam, and Hinduism. One senator says that she is religiously unaffiliated, while the number of members refusing to specify their religious affiliation increased.[25][26][27]

Ten members are accountants, two of which are Senators; and of the eight Representatives three are CPAs.[28]

Senate

The Senate includes 75 men and 25 women — the most women to date. In 6 states, both senators are women; 13 states are represented by 1 man and 1 woman; and 31 states are represented by 2 men. There are 91 non-Hispanic white, 4 Hispanic, 3 Black, 3 Asian, and 1 multiracial senators. And 2 senators identify as LGBTQ+.[29][1]

House of Representatives

There are 102 women in the House, the largest number in history.[30] There are 313 non-Hispanic whites, 56 black, 44 Hispanic, 15 Asian, and 4 Native American. Eight identify as LGBTQ+.[31] Two Democrats — Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Donna Shalala — are the youngest (29) and oldest (77) freshman women in history.[32] Freshmen women Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) and Ilhan Omar (DFL-MN) are the first two female Muslims and freshmen Sharice Davids (D-KS) and Deb Haaland (D-NM) are the first two female Native American members.[33]

Members

Senate

The numbers refer to their Senate classes. All class 1 seats were contested in the November 2018 elections. In this Congress, class 1 means their term commenced in the current Congress, requiring re-election in 2024; class 2 means their term ends with this Congress, requiring re-election in 2020; and class 3 means their term began in the last Congress, requiring re-election in 2022.

116th United States Congress Senators
Senate composition by state
  2 Democrats (18 states)
  1 Independent and 1 Democrat (1 state)
  1 Democrat and 1 Republican (8 states)
  1 Independent and 1 Republican (1 state)
  2 Republicans (22 states)
Us senate 116th congress
Senators by state
Mitch McConnell 2016 official photo (cropped)
John Thune, official portrait, 111th Congress
Chuck Schumer official photo (cropped)
Richard Durbin official photo (cropped)

House of Representatives

116th US House
House composition by district
     Democratic member      Republican member
Steny Hoyer, official photo as Whip
James Clyburn, official Congressional Majority Whip photo
House Maj. Leader Kevin McCarthy official photo (cropped)
Steve Scalise official portrait (cropped)

Changes in membership

Senate

State
(class)
Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation[g]
Florida
(1)
Vacant Senator-elect chose to wait until finishing term as Governor of Florida.[34] Rick Scott
(R)
January 8, 2019

House of Representatives

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation[g]
North Carolina 9 Vacant Vacant since the January 3, 2019 beginning of the term as allegations of fraud in the 2018 general election prevented the results from being certified.
A special election will be held September 10, 2019.[38]
TBD TBD
Pennsylvania 12 Tom Marino
(R)
Resigned January 23, 2019 to take job in private sector.[37]
A special election was held May 21, 2019.[39]
Fred Keller
(R)
TBD
North Carolina 3 Walter B. Jones Jr.
(R)
Died February 10, 2019.
A special election will be held September 10, 2019.[40]
TBD TBD

Committees

Section contents: Senate, House, Joint

Listed alphabetically by chamber, including Chair and Ranking Member.

Senate

Committee Chair Ranking Member[41]
Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry Pat Roberts (R-KS) Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)
Appropriations Richard Shelby (R-AL) Patrick Leahy (D-VT)
Armed Services Jim Inhofe (R-OK) Jack Reed (D-RI)
Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Mike Crapo (R-ID) Sherrod Brown (D-OH)
Budget Mike Enzi (R-WY) Bernie Sanders (I-VT)
Commerce, Science and Transportation Roger Wicker (R-MS) Maria Cantwell (D-WA)
Energy and Natural Resources Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) Joe Manchin (D-WV)
Environment and Public Works John Barrasso (R-WY) Tom Carper (D-DE)
Finance Chuck Grassley (R-IA) Ron Wyden (D-OR)
Foreign Relations Jim Risch (R-ID) Bob Menendez (D-NJ)
Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Lamar Alexander (R-TN) Patty Murray (D-WA)
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Ron Johnson (R-WI) Gary Peters (D-MI)
Judiciary Lindsey Graham (R-SC) Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)
Rules and Administration Roy Blunt (R-MO) Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Small Business and Entrepreneurship Marco Rubio (R-FL) Ben Cardin (D-MD)
Veterans' Affairs Johnny Isakson (R-GA) Jon Tester (D-MT)
Aging (Special) Susan Collins (R-ME) Bob Casey Jr. (D-PA)
Ethics (Select) Johnny Isakson (R-GA) Chris Coons (D-DE)
Indian Affairs (Permanent Select) John Hoeven (R-ND) Tom Udall (D-NM)
Intelligence (Select) Richard Burr (R-NC) Mark Warner (D-VA)
International Narcotics Control (Permanent Caucus) John Cornyn (R-TX) Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)

House of Representatives

Committee Chair Ranking Member
Agriculture Collin Peterson (D-MN) Mike Conaway (R-TX)
Appropriations Nita Lowey (D-NY) Kay Granger (R-TX)
Armed Services Adam Smith (D-WA) Mac Thornberry (R-TX)
Budget John Yarmuth (D-KY) Steve Womack (R-AR)
Education and Labor Bobby Scott (D-VA) Virginia Foxx (R-NC)
Energy and Commerce Frank Pallone (D-NJ) Greg Walden (R-OR)
Ethics Ted Deutch (D-FL) Kenny Marchant (R-TX)
Financial Services Maxine Waters (D-CA) Patrick McHenry (R-NC)
Foreign Affairs Eliot Engel (D-NY) Michael McCaul (R-TX)
Homeland Security Bennie Thompson (D-MS) Mike Rogers (R-AL)
House Administration Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) Rodney Davis (R-IL)
Judiciary Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) Doug Collins (R-GA)
Natural Resources Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ) Rob Bishop (R-UT)
Oversight and Reform Elijah Cummings (D-MD) Jim Jordan (R-OH)
Rules Jim McGovern (D-MA) Tom Cole (R-OK)
Science, Space and Technology Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) Frank Lucas (R-OK)
Small Business Nydia Velázquez (D-NY) Steve Chabot (R-OH)
Transportation and Infrastructure Peter DeFazio (D-OR) Sam Graves (R-MO)
Veterans' Affairs Mark Takano (D-CA) Phil Roe (R-TN)
Ways and Means Richard Neal (D-MA) Kevin Brady (R-TX)
Climate Crisis (Select) Kathy Castor (D-FL) Garret Graves (R-LA)
Human Rights (Lantos Commission) Jim McGovern (D-MA) Chris Smith (R-NJ)
Intelligence (Permanent Select) Adam Schiff (D-CA) Devin Nunes (R-CA)
Modernization of Congress (Select) Derek Kilmer (D-WA) Tom Graves (R-GA)[42]

Joint

Committee Chair Vice Chair Ranking Member Vice Ranking Member
Economic Mike Lee (R-UT) Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) David Schweikert (R-AZ) Martin Heinrich (D-NM)
Library Roy Blunt (R-MO) Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) Rodney Davis (R-IL) Amy Klobuchar (D-MN)
Printing Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) Roy Blunt (R-MO) Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) Rodney Davis (R-IL)
Taxation[h] Rich Neal (D-MA) Chuck Grassley (R-IA) Ron Wyden (D-OR) Kevin Brady (R-TX)

Employees and legislative agency directors

Often called "Elected" leaders, there are many employees of the House and Senate whose leaders are included here.

Senate

House of Representatives

Legislative branch agency directors

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Rick Scott (R-Florida) assumed office on January 8, 2019, after his term as Governor of Florida expired.
  2. ^ a b In North Carolina's 9th district: the November 2018 election results were not initially certified due to a dispute over voting irregularities.
  3. ^ a b In Pennsylvania's 12th district: Tom Marino (R) resigned January 23, 2019 and Fred Keller (R) was elected May 21, 2019.
  4. ^ In North Carolina's 3rd district: Walter Jones (R) died February 10, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g The Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL) is the Minnesota affiliate of the U.S. Democratic Party and its members are counted as Democrats.
  6. ^ Although Sanders is running for President in the Democratic primary and will claim to be a "bona fide Democrat" in accordance to DNC rules, he is currently and officially an Independent Senator.[35]
  7. ^ a b This is the date the member was seated or an oath administered, not necessarily the same date her/his service began.
  8. ^ The Joint Taxation Committee leadership rotate the chair and vice chair and the ranking members between the House and Senate at the start of each session (calendar year) in the middle of the congressional term. The first session leadership is shown here.

References

  1. ^ a b Jin, Beatrice (January 7, 2019) [First published November 23, 2018]. "Congress's incoming class is younger, bluer, and more diverse than ever". Politico. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  2. ^ Bresnahan, John; Caygle, Heather; Bade, Rachel (November 28, 2018). "Pelosi grabs momentum with big speaker vote". Politico. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  3. ^ DBonis, Mike; Sullivan, Sean (January 3, 2019). "Pelosi re-elected as House speaker as 116th Congress opens". The Mercury News. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  4. ^ "PRESIDENT TRUMP STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS". Associated Press. February 5, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  5. ^ Gay Stolberg, Sheryl (January 23, 2019). "Trump Say's He'll Delay Speech Until After Shutdown, as Democrats Draft Border Security Plan". The New York Times. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  6. ^ "Michael D. Cohen's Congressional Testimony". The New York Times. February 27, 2019. Retrieved March 6, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Leadership & Officers". Senate.gov. Retrieved January 8, 2019.
  8. ^ Wagner, John; DeBonis, Mike (November 14, 2018). "Congressional leadership elections: House Republicans elect Kevin McCarthy as next leader; Pelosi seeks to shore up votes for speaker". The Washington Post PowerPost blog. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g Fandos, Nicholas (November 14, 2018). "House Republicans Pick Kevin McCarthy as Their Next Leader". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 22, 2018. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  10. ^ a b c d Bolton, Alexander (November 14, 2018). "McConnell reelected as leader, Thune promoted to whip". The Hill. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  11. ^ a b "Senator Lankford to Serve on Deputy Whip Team for 116th Congress - U.S. Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma". www.lankford.senate.gov.
  12. ^ Lesniewski, Niels (January 3, 2019). "Dick Durbin says he's running for Senate re-election in 2020, unofficially". Roll Call. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  13. ^ Lesniewski, Niels (November 15, 2018). "Catherine Cortez Masto Becomes First Latina to Lead DSCC". Roll Call. Archived from the original on December 6, 2018. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  14. ^ "Schatz, Booker Elevated To Leadership Posts - U.S. Senator Brian Schatz of Hawaii". www.schatz.senate.gov.
  15. ^ McPherson, Lindsey; McPherson, Lindsey (November 28, 2018). "Steny Hoyer Elected House Majority Leader". Roll Call. Archived from the original on November 29, 2018. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  16. ^ McPherson, Lindsey (November 28, 2018). "James Clyburn Elected Majority Whip". Roll Call. Archived from the original on December 9, 2018. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  17. ^ McPherson, Lindsey (November 28, 2018). "Rep. Ben Ray Luján Elected Assistant Democratic Leader". Roll Call. Archived from the original on November 29, 2018. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  18. ^ McPherson, Lindsey (November 28, 2018). "Hakeem Jeffries Wins Democratic Caucus Chair Race Against Barbara Lee". Roll Call. Archived from the original on November 28, 2018. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  19. ^ McPherson, Lindsey (November 29, 2018). "Katherine Clark Elected House Democratic Caucus Vice Chair". Roll Call. Archived from the original on December 9, 2018. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  20. ^ Pathé, Simone (November 29, 2018). "Cheri Bustos Elected DCCC Chair". Roll Call. Archived from the original on December 9, 2018. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  21. ^ a b c McPherson, Lindsey (December 4, 2018). "House Democrats' New Elected Leadership Team Is More Progressive and Diverse". Roll Call. Archived from the original on December 5, 2018. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  22. ^ a b c "DeGette dropped from chief deputy whip spot". December 13, 2018. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved December 13, 2018.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g "Here's the List of House Republican Leaders for the Next Congress". Roll Call. November 14, 2018. Archived from the original on December 6, 2018. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  24. ^ McPherson, Lindsey (November 27, 2018). "Scalise Appoints Rep. Drew Ferguson as House GOP's Chief Deputy Whip". Roll Call. Archived from the original on November 28, 2018. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  25. ^ "Faith on the Hill". January 3, 2019. Archived from the original on January 4, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  26. ^ Women Elected at Historic Levels, But No Surprise Here: White Men Dominate 116th Congress Archived November 21, 2018, at the Wayback Machine November 7, 2018
  27. ^ "As Christians split over Trump, minority faiths make their mark". Archived January 2, 2019, at the Wayback Machine November 7, 2018
  28. ^ Eric Levenson (April 14, 2019). "Sarah Sanders says Congress wouldn't understand Trump's taxes. But 10 members are accountants". CNN.com. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  29. ^ Edmondson, Catie; Lee, Jasmine C. (November 28, 2018). "Meet the New Freshmen in Congress: More Democrats, Diversity and Women". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 29, 2018. Retrieved December 22, 2018.
  30. ^ "A record number of women will be serving in the new Congress". Pew Research. December 18, 2018. Archived from the original on December 29, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  31. ^ Panetta, Grace; Lee, Samantha (December 16, 2018). "This one graphic shows how much more diverse the House of Representatives will become in January". Business Insider. Archived from the original on December 23, 2018. Retrieved December 22, 2018.
  32. ^ Grow, Jason (January 18, 2019). "'We Call Ourselves the Badasses': Meet the New Women of Congress". POLITICO. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  33. ^ "First Native American congresswomen hug after swearing-in". CNN. January 3, 2019. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  34. ^ a b Sonmez, Felicia (January 8, 2019). "Rick Scott sworn in as Florida's newest senator". South Florida SunSentinel. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  35. ^ DiStaso, John (February 22, 2019). "Independent Bernie Sanders to put in writing that he's a 'bona fide' Democrat". WMUR.
  36. ^ Sullivan, Kate. "Walter Jones dies at 76". CNN. Retrieved February 11, 2019.
  37. ^ a b Burke, Michael. "GOP Rep. Tom Marino resigns from Congress". The Hill. Retrieved January 17, 2019.
  38. ^ Caldwell, Leigh Ann. "New election ordered in North Carolina House district after possible illegal activities". NBC News. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  39. ^ Tom Wolf [@GovernorTomWolf] (January 24, 2019). "Having heard the concerns of county officials, I am scheduling the special election to fill the remainder of Congressman Marino's term on May 21, 2019 to coincide with the primary election" (Tweet). Retrieved January 24, 2019 – via Twitter.
  40. ^ https://www.newsobserver.com/news/state/north-carolina/article226865964.html
  41. ^ Solender, Andrew [@AndrewSolender] (December 11, 2018). "The office of @SenSchumer has released an official list of Senate Democratic Ranking Members and Vice Chairmen" (Tweet). Retrieved December 11, 2018 – via Twitter.
  42. ^ "Leader McCarthy Names Members for the House Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress". February 11, 2019.
  43. ^ "The Office of the Chaplain, United States House of Representatives". Chaplain.House.gov. Retrieved January 8, 2019.

External links

2019 North Carolina's 3rd congressional district special election

A special election will be held in 2019 to fill the vacancy in North Carolina's 3rd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives for the remainder of the 116th United States Congress. Walter B. Jones Jr., the incumbent representative, died on February 10, 2019.Parties held primaries to decide their nominees. In order to win a party nomination outright, under current state law, a candidate must exceed 30% of the vote to avoid a runoff (presuming that the second-place finisher calls for that runoff). There must be 30 days of absentee voting prior to each election, according to state law. Filing began on March 4 and ended March 8, as set by Governor Roy Cooper. Twenty-six candidates filed with the State Board of Elections by the filing deadline: 17 Republicans, 6 Democrats, 2 Libertarians, and 1 Constitution Party candidate. All candidates filed are affiliated with a political party. Candidates who wished to run as "unaffiliated" (independent) have until the date of the primary election to file petitions, which has passed. Five candidates advanced after the 1st primary elections: 2 Republicans, 1 Democrat, 1 Libertarian, and 1 Constitution Party candidate.

Cooper set the primary date of April 30, in which the Democrats selected Allen M. Thomas, Libertarians selected Tim Harris, and in the Constitution party primary businessman Greg Holt won by default, but no Republican achieved 30% of the vote. The Republican Primary runoff will occur on July 9 between 2 candidates that are both physicians, Greg Murphy and Joan Perry. The general election will be held on September 10.With the decision by the State Board of Elections to hold a new election to redo the 2018 North Carolina's 9th congressional district election, this becomes one of 2 congressional district special elections in North Carolina in 2019, the other being the 2019 North Carolina's 9th congressional district special election.

2019 North Carolina's 9th congressional district special election

A special election will be held in 2019 to fill the vacancy in North Carolina's 9th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives for the remainder of the 116th United States Congress. The seat has been vacant since the opening of the 116th Congress, following the refusal of the North Carolina State Board of Elections to certify the results of the November 2018 election in the district due to allegations of electoral fraud.Mark Harris, a Republican, led Democrat Dan McCready by 905 votes in the unofficial returns for the 2018 North Carolina's 9th congressional district election. However, allegations of fraud in the election prevented its certification. The North Carolina State Board of Elections set an evidentiary hearing to begin on February 18, 2019. After hearing evidence, including testimony from Harris himself, the board unanimously voted on February 21 to call a new election.The primary was held on May 14, 2019, with the general election on September 10.

The filing period for candidates ended on March 15. A total of 13 candidates qualified for the primary, among them 10 Republicans, 1 Democrat, 1 Libertarian and 1 Green. Dan McCready, the Democratic Party nominee in the 2018 election, ran again and faced no primary opposition. Among Republicans, neither Harris nor Robert Pittenger, the incumbent whom Harris defeated in the 2018 primary election, filed to run.With the announcement by the State Board ordering a new election, it becomes the second congressional special election in North Carolina in 2019, the other being the 3rd congressional district's special election.

2019 Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district special election

A special election was held on May 21, 2019, to fill the remainder of the term for Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives for the 116th United States Congress. Tom Marino, a Republican, resigned from office effective January 23.

2019 State of the Union Address

The 2019 State of the Union Address was given by the 45th President of the United States, Donald Trump, on Tuesday, February 5, 2019, at 9 p.m. EST in the chamber of the United States House of Representatives to the 116th United States Congress. Presiding over this joint session was the House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi, accompanied by Mike Pence, the Vice President of the United States. It was Trump's second State of the Union Address and his third speech to a joint session of the United States Congress. The Democratic Response was given by 2018 Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams and the Spanish-language response was given by California Attorney General and former U.S. Representative Xavier Becerra.The Address was watched by 46.8 million viewers, which aired live on 12 major television networks. Viewership statistics do not include views from online live streams. There were also 15.2 million interactions regarding the Address on social media.

2019 United States House of Representatives elections

There will be three special elections to the United States House of Representatives in 2019, during the 116th United States Congress.

2020 United States Senate special election in Arizona

The 2020 United States Senate special election in Arizona will be held on November 3, 2020. Following the death of Republican U.S. Senator John McCain on August 25, 2018, Governor Doug Ducey was required by Arizona law to appoint a Republican to fill the vacancy in McCain's Senate seat. In September 2018, Ducey appointed former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl to fill McCain's seat until after the Special Election of November 2020, which will determine who will serve the remainder of the term until January 2023. Kyl did not complete his interim appointment, and resigned on December 31, 2018. On December 18, 2018, Ducey announced that outgoing U.S. Representative Martha McSally would be appointed to fill the seat following Kyl's resignation. McSally was sworn in as Arizona's junior senator on January 3, 2019. She had been the Republican nominee for Arizona’s Class I U.S. Senate seat in 2018, but lost that race to Democrat Kyrsten Sinema.

Affordable College Textbook Act

The Affordable College Textbook Act is a United States legislative bill intended to support use of open textbooks. It was introduced on April 4, 2019, to the 116th Congress by four senators (Dick Durbin of Illinois, Angus King of Maine, Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, Tina Smith of Minnesota), and one representative (Joe Neguse of Colorado). Organizations supporting the bill include the American Federation of Teachers, the American Association of Community Colleges, the Association of Research Libraries, and Creative Commons.

Arizona's congressional districts

Arizona is divided into 9 congressional districts, each represented by a member of the United States House of Representatives.

The districts are currently represented in the 116th United States Congress as legal entities. As of 2018, Democrats became the majority in the state congressional delegation.

List of United States Senators in the 116th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of United States senators during the 116th United States Congress listed by seniority, from January 3, 2019, to January 3, 2021. It is a historical listing and will contain people who have not served the entire two-year Congress should anyone resign, die, or be expelled.

In this Congress, Kyrsten Sinema is the most junior senior senator and Maria Cantwell is the most senior junior senator.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.

List of acts of the 116th United States Congress

The 116th United States Congress, which began on January 3, 2019 and will end on January 3, 2021, has enacted 16 public laws and zero private laws.

List of bills in the 116th United States Congress

The following list includes proposed federal laws introduced during the 116th United States Congress. This Congress began on January 3, 2019.

List of freshman class members of the 116th United States Congress

The 116th United States Congress began on January 3, 2019. There were nine new senators (two Democrats, seven Republicans) and a minimum of 89 new representatives (59 Democrats, 29 Republicans, with one open seat pending), as well as one new delegate (a Democrat) at the start of its first session.

The Co-Presidents of the House Democratic Freshman Class are Colin Allred and Haley Stevens, while the President of the House Republican Freshman Class is Mark E. Green.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 116th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 116th United States Congress, which runs from January 3, 2019, through January 3, 2021, ordered by seniority.

List of members of the United States Senate

The United States Senate consists of 100 members, 2 from each of the 50 states. Below is a list of U.S. senators, sitting in the 116th United States Congress.

SAFE Banking Act

The SAFE Banking Act (H.R. 1595) (full title Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Act; also referred to as the SAFE Banking Act of 2019) is proposed legislation regarding disposition of funds gained through the cannabis industry in the United States. In March 2019, it was advanced by the House Financial Services Committee for a vote by the full United States House of Representatives.Sponsors of the bill were Ed Perlmutter of Colorado and Denny Heck of Washington State. The bill had "broad bipartisan support", and there were 152 cosponsors at the time of the committee vote – over a third of the entire House. Heck and Perlmutter "have introduced similar bills every Congress since 2013".As of May 9, 2019, the House bill had 178 cosponsors, and the Senate bill had 24 cosponsors.

Taxpayer First Act

The Taxpayer First Act of 2019, H.R. 1957, is a bill introduced in the 116th United States Congress which, according to one critic, would make it illegal for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to create free tax preparation software in an effort to prop up businesses like TurboTax and H&R Block. The bill has bipartisan support. Its passage by the House of Representatives on April 9, 2019 was praised by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. The legislation also addresses identity theft protection and taxpayer rights during an income tax audit. The bill includes a provision that will establish the IRS Independent Office of Appeals to resolve federal tax controversies without litigation.

United States House Financial Services Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion

The United States House Financial Services Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion is a subcommittee of the House Committee on Financial Services. The subcommittee was created for the 116th United States Congress by Chairwoman Maxine Waters.

United States House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis

The House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis is a select committee established in the 116th United States Congress in 2019 when Democrats regained the majority of the United States House of Representatives. The Chair is Congresswoman Kathy Castor of Florida. The committee has no mandate or subpoena power to compel witnesses to testify.Its predecessor was the United States House Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, which existed from 2007 to 2011, and was not renewed when the Republicans gained control of the House for the 112th Congress.Nancy Pelosi, in her then-role as House Minority Leader, called for the Select Committee a week prior to Election Day, telling the New York Times she wanted it to "'prepare the way with evidence' for energy conservation and other climate change mitigation legislation...Pelosi said it was clearly still needed to educate the public about the impact of more frequent extreme weather events." In November and December of 2018, youth climate activists with the Sunrise Movement pushed House Democrats to form a select committee with the mandate to draft "Green New Deal" legislation, working with incoming freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who proposed language for the committee's authorization. The activists staged a series of sit-ins in the offices of Nancy Pelosi, Steny Hoyer, and Jim McGovern, the incoming Speaker, Majority Leader, and Rules Committee chair. About two dozen Democratic members of Congress supported their proposal, but the incoming chairs of the Energy & Commerce and Natural Resources Committees, Reps. Frank Pallone and Raul Grijalva, opposed it.

Venezuela TPS Act of 2019

The Venezuela TPS Act of 2019 is a bill in the 116th United States Congress sponsored by Rep. Darren Soto (D-FL) and Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL). It aims to extend temporary protected status to Venezuelan nationals in light of the 2019 Venezuelan presidential crisis and the crisis in Venezuela in general.

The bill was introduced to the House as H.R. 549 on January 15, 2019.

United States Congresses (and year convened)

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.