103rd United States Congress

The One Hundred Third United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1993, to January 3, 1995, during the final weeks of George H. W. Bush's presidency and the first two years of Bill Clinton's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-first Census of the United States in 1990. Both chambers had a Democratic majority. This is the last Congress which the Democratic Party had both house majorities in the 20th Century.

103rd United States Congress
102nd ←
→ 104th
USCapitol
January 3, 1993 – January 3, 1995
Senate PresidentDan Quayle (R),
until January 20, 1993
Al Gore (D),
from January 20, 1993
Senate President pro temRobert Byrd (D)
House SpeakerTom Foley (D)
Members100 senators
435 members of the House
5 non-voting delegates
Senate MajorityDemocratic
House MajorityDemocratic
Sessions
1st: January 5, 1993 – November 26, 1993
2nd: January 25, 1994 – December 1, 1994

Major events

Major legislation

Party summary

Senate

103senate
Senate party standings on the opening day of Congress
  57 Democratic Senators
  43 Republican Senators
Party
(shading shows control)
Total Vacant
Democratic
(D)
Republican
(R)
End of the previous congress 57 43 100 0
Begin 57 43 100 0
End 53 47
Final voting share 53.0% 47.0%
Beginning of the next congress 47 53 100 0

House of Representatives

103 us house membership
House seats by party holding plurality in state
  80.1–100% Democratic
  80.1–100% Republican
  60.1–80% Democratic
  60.1–80% Republican
  50.1–60% Democratic
  50.1–60% Republican
  striped: 50–50 split
  1 independent
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of the previous Congress 270 1 164 435 0
Begin 258 1 176 435 0
End 256 177 434 1
Final voting share 59.2% 40.8%
Non-voting members 4 0 0 5 0
Beginning of the next Congress 204 1 230 435 0

Leadership

Senate

Dan Quayle crop
Dan Quayle (R)
(until January 20, 1993)
Al Gore, Vice President of the United States, official portrait 1994
Al Gore (D)
(from January 20, 1993)

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

House of Representatives

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

Caucuses

Members

This list is arranged by chamber, then by state. Senators are listed in order of seniority, and Representatives are listed by district.

Senate

Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress, In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring reelection in 1994; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring reelection in 1996; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring reelection in 1998.

103rd Congress-Senate
Senators' party membership by state
(at the beginning of the Congress)
GeorgeJMitchellPortrait
Majority Leader of the Senate
George J. Mitchell (D)
Bob Dole, PCCWW photo portrait
Minority Leader of the Senate
Bob Dole (R)
Wendell-H-Ford
Majority Whip of the Senate
Wendell H. Ford (D)
Alan Kooi Simpson
Minority Whip of the Senate
Alan K. Simpson (R)

House of Representatives

Dick Gephardt
Majority Leader of the House
Dick Gephardt (D)
Robert H. Michel--95th Congress
Minority Leader of the House
Robert H. Michel (R)
DavidEBonior
Majority Whip of the House
David E. Bonior (D)
Newt Gingrich by Gage Skidmore 3
Minority Whip of the House
Newt Gingrich (R)

Changes in membership

Senate

State
(class)
Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
Texas
(1)
Lloyd Bentsen (D) Resigned January 20, 1993, to become United States Secretary of the Treasury.
His successor was appointed.
Bob Krueger (D) January 21, 1993
Texas
(1)
Bob Krueger (D) Interim appointee lost special election June 6, 1993.
His successor was elected to finish the term.
Kay Bailey Hutchison (R) June 14, 1993
Alabama
(3)
Richard Shelby (D) Changed party November 9, 1994 Richard Shelby (R) November 9, 1994
Oklahoma
(2)
David L. Boren (D) Resigned November 15, 1994, to become President of the University of Oklahoma.
His successor was elected in a special election to finish the term.
Jim Inhofe (R) November 17, 1994
Tennessee
(2)
Harlan Mathews (D) Interim appointee did not seek election.
His successor was elected in a special election November 8, 1994, to finish the term.
Fred Thompson (R) December 2, 1994

House of Representatives

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
Wisconsin's 1st Les Aspin (D) Resigned to January 20, 1993, become United States Secretary of Defense Peter W. Barca (D) May 4, 1993
Mississippi's 2nd Mike Espy (D) Resigned January 22, 1993, to become United States Secretary of Agriculture Bennie Thompson (D) April 13, 1993
California's 17th Leon Panetta (D) Resigned January 23, 1993, to become Director of the Office of Management and Budget Sam Farr (D) June 8, 1993
Ohio 2nd Bill Gradison (R) Resigned January 31, 1993, to become president of the Health Insurance Association of America Rob Portman (R) May 4, 1993
Michigan 3rd Paul B. Henry (R) Died July 31, 1993 Vern Ehlers (R) December 7, 1993
Oklahoma's 6th Glenn English (D) Resigned January 7, 1994, to become CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Frank Lucas (R) May 10, 1994
Kentucky's 2nd William H. Natcher (D) Died March 29, 1994 Ron Lewis (R) May 24, 1994
New Jersey 11th Dean Gallo (R) Died November 6, 1994 Vacant for remainder of term
Oklahoma's 1st Jim Inhofe (R) Resigned November 15, 1994, when elected to the U.S. Senate Steve Largent (R) November 29, 1994

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders, for members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (1 link), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

Senate

House of Representatives

  • Agriculture (Kika de la Garza, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • General Farm Commodities (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Livestock (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Specialty Crops and Natural Resources (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Department Operations and Nutrition (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Environment, Credit and Rural Development (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Foreign Agriculture and Hunger (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Appropriations (William Huston Natcher, then Dave Obey, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Commerce, Justice, State and the Judiciary (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Defense (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • District of Columbia (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Energy and Water Development (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Interior (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Labor, Health, Human Services, Education and Related Agencies (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Legislative (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Military Construction (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Agriculture, Rural Development and Related Agencies (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Transportation (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Treasury, Postal Service and General Government (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • VA, HUD and Independent Agencies
  • Armed Services (Ron Dellums, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Military Acquisition (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Research and Development (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Readiness (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Military Forces and Personnel (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Military Installations and Facilities (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Military Personnel and Compensation (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Oversight and Investigations (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs (Henry B. Gonzalez, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Housing and Community Development (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Financial Institutions Supervision, Regulation and Deposit Insurance (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • International Development, Finance, Trade and Monetary Policy (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Economic Growth and Credit Formation (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Consumer Credit and Insurance (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • General Oversight, Investigations and the Resolution of Failed Financial Institutions (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Budget (Martin Olav Sabo, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • District of Columbia (Pete Stark, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Fiscal Affairs and Health (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Government Operations and Metropolitan Affairs (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Judiciary and Education (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Education and Labor (William D. Ford, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Postsecondary Education (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Health and Safety (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Labor Standards, Occupational Health and Safety (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Elementary, Secondary and Vocational Education (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Labor-Management Relations (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Human Resources (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Select Education and Rights (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Energy and Commerce (John Dingell, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Oversight and Investigations (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Health and the Environment (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Energy and Power (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Telecommunications and Finance (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Transportation and Hazardous Materials (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Commerce, Transportation and Competitiveness (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Foreign Affairs (Lee H. Hamilton, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Europe and the Middle East (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Economic Policy, Trade and Environment (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • International Security, International Organizations and Human Rights (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Western Hemisphere Affairs (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • International Operations (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Asia and the Pacific (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Africa (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Government Operations (John Conyers, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Elections (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Libraries and Memorials (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Office Systems (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Accounts (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Personnel and Police (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Administrative Oversight (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • House Administration (Charlie Rose, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Elections (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Libraries and Memorials (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Office Systems (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Accounts (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Personnel and Police (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Administrative Oversight (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Interior and Insular Affairs (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Economic and Commercial Law (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Civil and Constitutional Rights (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • International Law, Immigration and Refugees (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Intellectual Property and Judicial Administration (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Crime and Criminal Justice (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Administrative Law and Governmental Relations (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Judiciary (Jack Brooks, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Elections (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Libraries and Memorials (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Office Systems (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Accounts (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Personnel and Police (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Administrative Oversight (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Merchant Marine and Fisheries (Gerry Studds, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Merchant Marine (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Environment and Natural Resources (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Fisheries Management (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Oceanography, Gulf of Mexico and the Outer Continental Shelf (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Coast Guard and Navigation (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Administrative Law and Governmental Relations (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Natural Resources (George Miller, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Post Office and Civil Service (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Oversight and Investigations (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Civil Affairs (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Census, Statistics and Portal Personnel (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Compensation and Employee Benefits (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Postal Operations and Services (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Public Works and Transportation (Norman Mineta, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Aviation (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Economic Development (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Investigations and Oversight (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Public Buildings and Grounds (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Surface Transportation (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Rules (Joe Moakley, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Rules of the House (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Legislative Process (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Science, Space and Technology (George Brown Jr., Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Energy (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Space (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Technology, Environment and Aviation (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Science (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Investigations and Oversight (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Small Business (John J. LaFalce, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • SBA Legislation and the General Economy (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Regulation, Business Opportunities and Technology (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Procurement, Taxation and Tourism (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Minority Enterprise, Finance and Urban Development (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Rural Enterprises, Exports and the Environment (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Standards of Official Conduct (Jim McDermott, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Veterans' Affairs (Gillespie V. Montgomery, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Education, Training and Employment (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Compensation, Pension and Insurance (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Oversight and Investigations (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Hospitals and Health Care (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
    • Housing and Memorial Affairs (, Chair; , Ranking Member)
  • Ways and Means (Dan Rostenkowski, Chair, Sam Gibbons, acting; , Ranking Member)
  • Whole

Joint committees

Employees and legislative agency directors

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

See also

External links

1992 United States House of Representatives election in the District of Columbia

The 1992 congressional election for the Delegate from the District of Columbia was held on November 3, 1992. The winner of the race was Eleanor Holmes Norton (D), who won her first re-election. All elected members would serve in 103rd United States Congress.

The non-voting delegate to the United States House of Representatives from the District of Columbia is elected for two-year terms.

1992 United States elections

The 1992 United States elections elected state governors, the national president, and members of the 103rd United States Congress. The election took place after the redistricting that resulted from the 1990 Census. Democrats won control of the presidency and both chambers of Congress for the first time since the Republican victory in the 1980 elections.

In the presidential election, Democratic Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas defeated Republican incumbent President George H. W. Bush and Texas businessman Ross Perot. Clinton easily won the electoral college with 370 electoral votes, but took just 43 percent of the popular vote, the fourth-lowest share of any victorious presidential candidate. Perot's independent candidacy won the largest share of the popular vote of any third party or independent candidate since Theodore Roosevelt's 1912 candidacy. Clinton defeated former California Governor Jerry Brown and former Massachusetts Senator Paul Tsongas to take the Democratic nomination. Bush defeated a primary challenge from commentator, and former Reagan White House Director of Communications Pat Buchanan to earn re-nomination as the Republican candidate.Democrats lost a handful of House seats but easily held onto their majority in the chamber.A small number of seats changed hands in the Senate, but Democrats retained a comfortable majority.In the gubernatorial elections, the Democratic Party won a net gain of two states.

1994 State of the Union Address

The 1994 State of the Union address was given by President Bill Clinton to a joint session of the 103rd United States Congress on Tuesday, January 25, 1994. The speech was Clinton's first official State of the Union address, although he had similarly addressed a joint session of Congress a year prior shortly after taking office.

The president discussed the federal budget deficit, taxes, defense spending, crime, foreign affairs, education, the economy, free trade, the role of government, campaign finance reform, welfare reform, and promoting the Clinton health care plan. President Clinton threatened to veto any legislation that did not guarantee every American private health insurance. He proposed for policies to fight crime: a three strikes law for repeat violent offenders; 100,000 more police officers on the streets; expand gun control to further prevent criminals from being armed and ban assault weapons; additional support for drug treatment and education.

The president began the speech with an acknowledgment of former Speaker Tip O'Neill, who died on January 5, 1994. While discussing additional community policing, the president honored Kevin Jett, a New York City cop attending the address who had been featured in a New York Times story in December 1993.The speech lasted 63 minutes and consisted of 7,432 words. It was the longest State of the Union speech since Lyndon B. Johnson's 1967 State of the Union Address. Republican Representative Henry Hyde criticized the speech as "interminable".The Republican Party response was delivered by Senator Bob Dole of Kansas. Dole argued that health care in the United States was not in crisis, the Republican opposition to Clinton's plans in the previous year had been popular, and the deficit reduction was the temporary result of tax increases.Mike Espy, the Secretary of Agriculture, served as the designated survivor.

Contrary to common belief, Clinton did not have to recite the speech from memory because the teleprompter was loaded with the wrong speech. This had happened the previous year: in a speech Clinton gave to Congress on 22 September 1993 detailing the Clinton health care plan, the teleprompter was loaded with the wrong speech. Specifically, the one he gave to a joint session of Congress shortly after he was sworn-in in 1993. Teleprompter operators practiced with the old speech and it was accidentally left in, forcing Clinton to ad-lib for almost ten minutes. The two incidents are often conflated. What happened is that President Clinton simply referenced the September 1993 incident.

Aleut Restitution Act of 1988

The Aleut Restitution Act of 1988 (also known as the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands Restitution Act) was a reparation settlement passed by the United States Congress in 1988, in response to the internment of Aleut people living in the Aleutian Islands during World War II.

Before the Japanese invasion of Attu and Kiska in 1942, the United States forcibly relocated some 800 Aleuts to camps in Southeast Alaska, where it is estimated that more than 1 in 10 evacuees perished.

Amendments to the National Wool Act

The Amendments to the National Wool Act Pub. L. 103-130 (selected provisions), 107 Stat. 1368-1369 (1993), signed into law November 1, 1993, phased out wool and mohair price supports at the end of 1995.

Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act

The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act (Pub.L. 103–159, 107 Stat. 1536, enacted November 30, 1993), often referred to as the Brady Act or the Brady Bill, is an Act of the United States Congress that mandated federal background checks on firearm purchasers in the United States, and imposed a five-day waiting period on purchases, until the NICS system was implemented in 1998.

The original legislation was introduced into the House of Representatives by Representative Charles E. Schumer in March 1991, but was never brought to a vote. The bill was reintroduced by Rep. Schumer on February 22, 1993 and the final version was passed on November 11, 1993. It was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993 and the law went into effect on February 28, 1994. The Act was named after James Brady, who was shot and wounded by John Hinckley Jr. during an attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan on March 30, 1981.

Driver's Privacy Protection Act

The Driver's Privacy Protection Act of 1994 (also referred to as the "DPPA"), Title XXX of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, is a United States federal statute governing the privacy and disclosure of personal information gathered by state Departments of Motor Vehicles.

The law was passed in 1994. It was introduced by democrat Rep. Jim Moran of Virginia in 1992, after an increase in opponents of abortion rights using public driving license databases to track down and harass abortion providers and patients. Prominent among such cases was physician Susan Wicklund, who faced protests and harassment including her house being picketed for a month. The law is currently codified at Chapter 123 of Title 18 of the United States Code.

Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993

The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) is a United States labor law requiring covered employers to provide employees with job-protected and unpaid leave for qualified medical and family reasons. These include pregnancy, adoption, foster care placement of a child, personal or family illness, or family military leave. The FMLA is administered by the Wage and Hour Division of the United States Department of Labor.

The FMLA was intended "to balance the demands of the workplace with the needs of families." The Act allows eligible employees to take up to 12 work weeks of unpaid leave during any 12-month period to attend to the serious health condition of the employee, parent, spouse or child, or for pregnancy or care of a newborn child, or for adoption or foster care of a child. In order to be eligible for FMLA leave, an employee must have been at the business at least 12 months, and worked at least 1,250 hours over the past 12 months, and work at a location where the company employs 50 or more employees within 75 miles. The FMLA covers both public- and private-sector employees, but certain categories of employees are excluded, including elected officials and their personal staff members.

Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act

The Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (FACE or the Access Act, Pub. L. No. 103-259, 108 Stat. 694) (May 26, 1994, 18 U.S.C. § 248) is a United States law that was signed by President Bill Clinton in May 1994, which prohibits the following three things: (1) the use of physical force, threat of physical force, or physical obstruction to intentionally injure, intimidate, interfere with or attempt to injure, intimidate or interfere with any person who is obtaining reproductive health services or providing reproductive health services (this portion of the law typically refers to abortion clinics), (2) the use of physical force, threat of physical force, or physical obstruction to intentionally injure, intimidate, interfere with or attempt to injure, intimidate or interfere with any person who is exercising or trying to exercise their First Amendment right of religious freedom at a place of religious worship, (3) the intentional damage or destruction of a reproductive health care facility or a place of worship.

Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994

The Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994 (GFSA) was part of the Improving America's Schools Act of 1994 (IASA). The Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994 also amends the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.In 1994, Congress introduced the Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994, which encouraged each state receiving federal funds for education to follow suit and introduce their own laws, now known as zero tolerance laws. President Bill Clinton signed the Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994 into law on March 31, 1994. The Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994 requires each state receiving federal funds to have a state law in effect requiring local educational agencies to expel, for at least one year, any student who is determined to have brought a weapon to school. The one-year expulsion is mandatory, except when a chief administering officer of such local education agency may modify it on a case-by-case basis. In addition, schools are directed to develop policies requiring referral to the criminal justice or juvenile delinquency system for any student who brings a firearm or weapon to school.

Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act of 1994

In September 1994, President Bill Clinton signed into law the Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act of 1994, written by US Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy (D-Mass). The law requires certain disclosures and clamps restrictions on lenders of high-cost loans.Implemented via Regulation Z at 12 CFR 226.32, it only applies to non-purchase-money transactions.

The law gives the Federal Reserve Board the power to administer the act and to adjust the implementing regulations. Critics of Alan Greenspan argue that he failed to properly use these powers when subprime mortgage problems became apparent in 2005.

Immigration and Nationality Technical Corrections Act

The Immigration and Nationality Technical Corrections Act of 1994 (or H. R. 783) was an act by the United States Congress "to amend title III of the Immigration and Nationality Act to make changes in the laws relating to nationality and naturalization." The act amended the Immigration and Nationality Act by allowing to provide for the acquisition of United States citizenship from either parent for persons born abroad to parents, only one of whom is a United States citizen.The act was signed into law by President Bill Clinton, who said in his signing statement that act would correct the injustice towards persons born outside of the United States, and only one of whose parents was a United States citizen. Prior to the act, such persons could only acquire citizenship if that parent was the father. The act amended this condition to allow acquisition of US citizenship when either of the parents was a US citizen. The act also added additional weapons offenses, some theft and burglary offenses, prostitution, tax evasion, and certain categories of fraud to the definition of aggravated felonies, under which non-citizens were subject to deportation.

Improving America's Schools Act of 1994

The Improving America's Schools Act of 1994 (IASA) was a major part of the Clinton administration's efforts to reform education. It was signed in the gymnasium of Framingham High School (MA). It reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

It included provisions or reforms for:

The Title 1 program, providing extra help to disadvantaged students and holding schools accountable for their results at the same level as other students

Charter schools

Safe and Drug-free schools

Eisenhower Professional Development

Major increases in bilingual and immigrant education funding

Impact aid

Education technology and other programs.

International Broadcasting Act

Signed in law in 1994 by U.S. President Bill Clinton, this act was meant to streamline the U.S. international broadcasting and provide a cost-effective way to continue Radio Free Europe/ Radio Liberty, Voice of America, and Radio Marti. It placed control of the international broadcasting under the United States Information Agency.

List of United States Senators in the 103rd Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 103rd United States Congress listed by seniority, from January 3, 1993, to January 3, 1995.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a state governor. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the two-year congressional term (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1994 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

Michael Andrews

Michael Andrews may refer to:

Michael Andrews (artist) (1928–1995), British artist

Michael Andrews (boxer), Nigerian boxer

Michael Andrews (musician) (born 1967), American musician

Michael Andrews (rugby league) (born 1962), Australian rugby league footballer

Michael A. Andrews (born 1944), member of the United States House of Representatives in the 103rd United States Congress

Mike Andrews (born 1943), American baseball player

Mike Andrews (footballer) (born 1946), Australian rules football player for Fitzroy

Mickey Andrews (born 1942), American football coach

Michael Andrews (referee) (born 1956), Indian football referee

Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993 (or OBRA-93) was a federal law that was enacted by the 103rd United States Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton. It has also been referred to, unofficially, as the Deficit Reduction Act of 1993. Part XIII, which dealt with taxes and is also called the Revenue Reconciliation Act of 1993.

Solomon Amendment

The 1996 Solomon Amendment is the popular name of 10 U.S.C. § 983, a United States federal law that allows the Secretary of Defense to deny federal grants (including research grants) to institutions of higher education if they prohibit or prevent ROTC or military recruitment on campus.

Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act

The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, H.R. 3355, Pub.L. 103–322 is an Act of Congress dealing with crime and law enforcement; it became law in 1994. It is the largest crime bill in the history of the United States and consisted of 356 pages that provided for 100,000 new police officers, $9.7 billion in funding for prisons and $6.1 billion in funding for prevention programs, which were designed with significant input from experienced police officers. Sponsored by Representative Jack Brooks of Texas, the bill was originally written by Senator Joe Biden of Delaware and then was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton.

Following the 101 California Street shooting, the 1993 Waco Siege, and other high-profile instances of violent crime, the Act expanded federal law in several ways. One of the most noted sections was the Federal Assault Weapons Ban. Other parts of the Act provided for a greatly expanded federal death penalty, new classes of individuals banned from possessing firearms, and a variety of new crimes defined in statutes relating to immigration law, hate crimes, sex crimes, and gang-related crime. The bill also required states to establish registries for sexual offenders by September 1997.

United States Congresses (and year convened)

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