101 Names of God

In Zoroastrianism, 101 names of God (Pazand Sad-o-yak nam-i-khoda) is a list of names of God (Ahura Mazda). The list is preserved in Persian, Pazand and Gujarati.[1]

The 101 names are often taken during Baj (ceremonial prayer) during the Yasna ritual while continuously sprinkling with the ring made of "Hasht" (eight) metals with the hair of the pure Varasya named "Vars", into the water vessel.[2]

List of names

Two translations for each name are provided below, one by Meher Baba[3] the other from an online source (persiandna.com).[2]

Name Translations
Yazad
Yazad
Worthy of Worship
Yaz meaning worthy of being attuned; Praiseworthy
Harvesp-tawan
Harvesp-Tavaan
All-Powerful
Almighty
Harvesp-agah
Harvesp-Aagaah
All-Knowing
All-Knowing
Harvesp-khoda
Harvesp-Khudaa
Lord of all
Lord of All
Abadeh
Abadah
Without Beginning
Without Beginning
Abi-anjam
Abee-Anjaam
Without End
Without End
Bun-e-stiha
Bune-Steeh
Root of Creation
Root of Creation
Frakhtan-taih
Fraakhtan-Teh
Endless Bliss
The End of All
Jamaga
Jamaga
Primal Cause
Ancient Cause
Prajatarah
Parajtarah
Exalted One
More Noble
Tum-afik
Tum-Afeek
Purest of the Pure
Most Open (Innocent)
Abaravand
Abarvand
Detached from All
Separate from All
Paravandeh
Parvandaah
In touch with all
Connected with All
An-ayafeh
An-Aiyaafah
Unattainable
Unreachable by anyone
Hama-Ayafeh
Ham-Aiyaafah
Attainer of All
Who Can Reach All
Adro
Aadaro
Most Righteous
Most straightforward; Truest of All
Gira
Geeraa
Upholder of all
Who Holds Everyone
A-ehem
A-Chem
Beyond reason
Without Cause (Does not need a reason for existence)
Chamana
Chamanaa
Sovereign Reason
Reason for Being
Safana
Safanaa
Bountiful One
Creator of Progress
Afza
Afjaa
Ever Prolific
Creator of Growth
Nasha
Naashaa
Reaching equally to all
Who Reaches Everyone Equally
Parwara
Parvaraa
Nourisher
Provider
Ianaha
Eeyaanah
Protector of the world
Protector of Creation
Ain-aenah
Aaeen-Aaenah
Never Changing
Not Different
An-aenah
An-Aaeenah
Formless
Without Shape
Kharoshid-tum
Khrosheed-Tum
Most Steadfast among the Steadfast
Most Determined
Mino-tum
Meeno-Tum
Lord Invisible
Most Invisible
Vasna
Vaasnaa
All-Pervading
Omnipresent
Harvastum
Harvastum
All in all
Most Complete
Hu-sepas
Hu-Sepaas
Worthy of our profound thanks
Worthy of Thanksgiving
Har-Hamid
Har-Hameed
All embracing Goodness
Completely Good Natured
Har-naik faraih
Har-Nek-Fareh
All embracing Holy light
Completely Good Noble Aura
Baish-tarana
Besh-Tarnaa
Remover of affliction
Remover of Suffering
Taronish
Taroneesh
Beyond Affliction
Mysterious
Anah-aoshaka
An-Aoshak
Immortal
Immortal
Farasaka
Farsak
Fulfiller of Holy Desires
Grantor of Wishes
Pajohdehad
Pajoh-Dahad
Creator of Holy attributes
Creator of Noble Nature
Khwafar
Khvaafar
Compassionate Judge
Generous with Justice
Avakhshiaea
Afakhsheeaaeaa
Merciful Giver
Grantor of Generosity
Abaraja
Abarjaa
Bountiful Giver
Most Abundant Provider
A-satoha
A-Satoh
Unconquerable
Who Does Not Get Angry
Rakhoha
Rakhoh
Freest of the free
Independent; Without Worry
Varun
Varoon
Deliverer from evil
Protector from Evil
A-farefah
A-Farefah
Never Deceiving
Who Does Not Deceive
Be-fareftah
Be-Farefah
Never Deceived
Who Cannot Be Deceived
A-dui
A-Duee
One without a second
Without Duality
Kam-rad
Kaame-Rad
Lord of desire
Lord of Wishes
Farman-kam
Farmaan-Kaam
Decreer of Sovereign Desire
Wish Is His Command
Aekh Tan
Aokh-Tan
Soul Supreme
Without Body
A-faremosh
A-Faremosh
Never-forgetting
Who Does Not Forget
Hamarna
Hamaarnaa
Just Accountant
Keeper of Accounts
Sanaea
Sanaaeaa
Knowing all things
Worthy of Knowing; All Knowing
A-tars
A-Tars
Fearless
Fearless
A-bish
A-Beesh
Devoid of pain
Without Suffering
A-frajdum
Afraajdum
Most exalted one
Most High
Ham-chun
Ham-Chun
Ever the same
Always the Same
Mino-satihgar
Meeno-Steeh-Gar
Invisible Creator of the Universe
Creator of the Universe Invisibly
A-minogar
A-Meenogar
Creator of the Profoundly Spiritual
Creator of Much Invisible Creations
Mino-nahab
Meeno-Nahab
Hidden within the spirit
Hidden in Invisible Creation
Adar-bad-gar
Aadar-Baad-Gar
Transmuter of Fire into Air
Who Changes Fire Into Air
Adar-nam-gar
Aadar-Nam-Gar
Transmuter of Fire into dew
Who Changes Fire Into Water
Bad-adar-gar
Baad-Aadar-Gar
Transmuter of Air into Fire
Who Changes Air Into Fire
Bad-nam-gar
Baad-Nam-Gar
Transmuter of Air into dew
Who Changes Air Into Water
Bad-gail-gar
Baad-Gel-Gar
Transmuter of Air into Earth
Who Changes Air Into Dust
Bad-gred-tum
Baad-Gerd-Tum
Supreme Transmuter of Air into dust
Who Changes Air Into Wind
Adar-kibritatum
Aadar-Keebreet-Tum
Supreme Transmuter of Fire into divine sparks
Who Changes Fire Into Jewels
Bad-gar-jae
Baad-Garjaae
Spreading Air everywhere
Who Creates Air In All Places
Ab-tum
Aab-Tum
Creator of Lifegiving water
Creator of Much Water
Gail-adar-gar
Gel-Aadar-Gar
Transmuter of Dust into Fire
Who Changes Dust Into Fire
Gail-vad-gar
Gel-Vaad-Gar
Transmuter of Dust into Air
Who Changes Dust Into Air
Gail-nam-gar
Gel-Nam-Gar
Transmuter of Dust into water
Who Changes Dust Into Water
Gar-gar
Gar-Gar
Master Craftsman
Creator of Creators
Garo-gar
Gar-O-Gar
Rewarder of sincere desires
(Fulfiller of Wishes) *
Gar-a-gar
Gar-Aa-Gar
Creator of all Humanity and its actions
(Creator of Mankind) *
Gar-a-gar-gar
Gar-Aa-Gar-Gar
Creator of all Human and Animal Life
(Creator of All Things) *
A-gar-agar
A-Gar-Aa-Gar
Creator of all the four elements
(Creator of 4 Elements) *
A-gar-a-gar-gar
A-Gar-Aa-Gar-Gar
Creator of all the planets and all other worlds
(Creator of Stars) *
A-guman
A-Gumaan
Never in doubt
Without Doubt
A-jaman
A-Jamaan
Ageless
Timeless
A-Khuan
A-Khuaan
Eternally awake
Sleepless
Amast
Aamasht
Ever-alert
Alert
Fashutana
Fashutanaa
Ever-Protecting
Always Guarding & Progress Creator
Padmani
Padmaanee
Recorder of Man's actions
Keeper of Limits
Firozgar
Feerozgar
Victorious
Victorious
Khudawand
Khudaavand
Lord of the Universe
Lord of Creation
Ahuramazd
Ahur-Mazd
Lord of Life and Wisdom
Wise Lord
Abarin-kuhan-tawan
Abreen-Kohun-Tavaan
Preserver of Creation
Most Capable of Preserving Originality of Creations
Abarin-nao-tawan
Abreen-No-Tavaan
Renewer of Creation
Most Capable of Creating New Creations
Vaspan
Vaspaan
Embracing All Creation
Who Can Reach All Creations
Vaaspar
Vaspaar
Giver of All Things
Who Can Provide Everything
Khawar
Khaavar
Infinitely Patient
Generous
Ahu
Ahu
Lord of exisience
Lord of Existence
Avakshidar
Avakhseedaar
Forgiver of sins
Forgiver
Dadar
Daadaar
Divine Creator
Creator of Justice
Raiyomand
Rayomand
Rayed in glory
Full of Brightness
Khorehmand
Khorehomand
Haloed in Light
Full of Aura, Light
Davar
Daavar
Lord of Justice
Giver of True Justice
Kerfaigar
Kerfegar
Lord of Just Rewards
Lord of Good Works
Bokhtar
Bokhtaar
Liberator
Giver of Freedom for Progress
Farsho-gar
Frash-Gar
Awakener of Eternal Spring
Refresher of the Soul with Progress

See also

References

  1. ^ Antonio Panaino, The lists of names of Ahura Mazdā (Yašt I) and Vayu (Yašt XV), 2002, p. 20.
  2. ^ a b http://persiandna.com/101names.htm
  3. ^ 101 Names of Avatar Meher Baba
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Games capture the ideas and worldviews of their cultures and pass them on to the future generation. Games were important as cultural and social bonding events, as teaching tools and as markers of social status. As pastimes of royalty and the elite, some games became common features of court culture and were also given as gifts. Games such as Senet and the Mesoamerican ball game were often imbued with mythic and ritual religious significance. Games like Gyan chauper and The Mansion of Happiness were used to teach spiritual and ethical lessons while Shatranj and Wéiqí (Go) were seen as a way to develop strategic thinking and mental skill by the political and military elite.

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Khuda or Khoda (Persian: خدا‎) is the Persian word for "Lord" or "God". Originally, it was used in reference to Ahura Mazda (the name of God in Zoroastrianism). Other Iranian languages also use it.

Names of God

A number of traditions have lists of many names of God, many of which enumerate the various qualities of a Supreme Being. The English word "God" (and its equivalent in other languages) is used by multiple religions as a noun or name to refer to different deities, or specifically to the Supreme Being, as denoted in English by the capitalized and uncapitalized terms "god" and "God". Ancient cognate equivalents for the biblical Hebrew Elohim, one of the most common names of God in the Bible, include proto-Semitic El, biblical Aramaic Elah, and Arabic 'ilah. The personal or proper name for God in many of these languages may either be distinguished from such attributes, or homonymic. For example, in Judaism the tetragrammaton is sometimes related to the ancient Hebrew ehyeh ("I will be"). In the Hebrew Bible (Exodus 3:15), the personal name of God is revealed directly to Moses, namely: "Yahweh".Correlation between various theories and interpretation of the name of "the one God", used to signify a monotheistic or ultimate Supreme Being from which all other divine attributes derive, has been a subject of ecumenical discourse between Eastern and Western scholars for over two centuries. In Christian theology the word must be a personal and a proper name of God; hence it cannot be dismissed as mere metaphor. On the other hand, the names of God in a different tradition are sometimes referred to by symbols. The question whether divine names used by different religions are equivalent has been raised and analyzed.Exchange of names held sacred between different religious traditions is typically limited. Other elements of religious practice may be shared, especially when communities of different faiths are living in close proximity (for example, the use of Om and Gayatri within the Indian Christian community) but usage of the names themselves mostly remains within the domain of a particular religion, or even may help define one's religious belief according to practice, as in the case of the recitation of names of God (such as the japa). Guru Gobind Singh's Jaap Sahib, which contains 950 names of God. The Divine Names, the classic treatise by Pseudo-Dionysius, defines the scope of traditional understandings in Western traditions such as Hellenic, Christian, Jewish and Islamic theology on the nature and significance of the names of God. Further historical lists such as The 72 Names of the Lord show parallels in the history and interpretation of the name of God amongst Kabbalah, Christianity, and Hebrew scholarship in various parts of the Mediterranean world.The attitude as to the transmission of the name in many cultures was surrounded by secrecy. In Judaism, the pronunciation of the name of God has always been guarded with great care. It is believed that, in ancient times, the sages communicated the pronunciation only once every seven years; this system was challenged by more recent movements.

The nature of a holy name can be described as either personal or attributive. In many cultures it is often difficult to distinguish between the personal and the attributive names of God, the two divisions necessarily shading into each other.

Seven Names of God Prayer

The Seven Names of God Prayer is a prayer given by Meher Baba to his students and close disciples to memorize and recite, often as a chant or song, at certain times during his life.

Hari, Paramatma,Allah, Ahuramazda,God, Yezdan, HuMeher Baba composed the prayer on June 16, 1927, for the students in his free school known as the Meher Ashram to memorize and recite daily. The boy's schedule included rising at 5:00 a.m. and after washing they were to chant The Seven Names of God prayer. The prayer was also sung before each meal in the dining hall. Baba later had his adult disciples memorize the prayer.

Baba composed another version during his final seclusion in 1967 that he had a disciple named Kaikobad repeat aloud in his presence.

Ya Yezdan, Ahuramazda,Allah, Ishwar, Paramatma,God Almighty, Parvardigar!

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