1,8-Dibromooctane

1,8-Dibromooctane is a chemical compound used in the synthesis of the carbamate nerve agents EA-3990 and octamethylene-bis(5-dimethylcarbamoxyisoquinolinium bromide).[1][2]

1,8-Dibromooctane
1,8-Dibromooctane
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
1,8-Dibromooctane
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.022.648
EC Number 224-912-5
Properties
C8H16Br2
Molar mass 272.024 g·mol−1
Melting point 12–16 °C (54–61 °F; 285–289 K)
Boiling point 270–272 °C (518–522 °F; 543–545 K)
Hazards
GHS pictograms The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word Warning
H315, H319, H335
P261, P264, P271, P280, P302+352, P304+340, P305+351+338, P312, P321, P332+313, P337+313, P362, P403+233, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

References

  1. ^ "Chemical agents". Google Patents.
  2. ^ "Isoquinilinium chemical agents". Google Patents.
Dibromooctane

Dibromooctane may refer to:

1,2-Dibromooctane

1,8-Dibromooctane

EA-3990

EA-3990 is a deadly carbamate nerve agent. It is lethal because it inhibits acetylcholinesterase. Inhibition causes an overly high accumulation of acetylcholine between the nerve and muscle cells. This paralyzes the muscles by preventing their relaxation. The paralyzed muscles includes the muscles used for breathing.Patent assigned to US army for EA-3990 among other similar nerve agents was filed in December 7, 1967.

Octamethylene-bis(5-dimethylcarbamoxyisoquinolinium bromide)

Octamethylene-bis(5-dimethylcarbamoxyisoquinolinium bromide) is an extremely potent carbamate nerve agent. It works by inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase, causing acetylcholine to accumulate. Since the agent molecule is positively charged, it does not cross the blood brain barrier very well.

Tear gas

Tear gas, formally known as a lachrymator agent or lachrymator (from the Latin lacrima, meaning "tear"), sometimes colloquially known as mace, is a chemical weapon that causes severe eye and respiratory pain, skin irritation, bleeding, and even blindness. In the eye, it stimulates the nerves of the lacrimal gland to produce tears. Common lachrymators include pepper spray (OC gas), PAVA spray (nonivamide), CS gas, CR gas, CN gas (phenacyl chloride), bromoacetone, xylyl bromide, syn-propanethial-S-oxide (from onions), and Mace (a branded mixture), and household vinegar.

Lachrymatory agents are commonly used for riot control. Their use in warfare is prohibited by various international treaties. During World War I, increasingly toxic and deadly lachrymatory agents were used.

Blood
Blister
Nerve
Neurotoxins
Nettle
Pulmonary/Choking agent
Vomiting agent
Incapacitating
Riot control
Other

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