is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅢ is U+3162.

Korean name
Hangul

The Korean alphabet, known as Hangul ( HAHN-gool; from Korean 한글, Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) in South Korea or Chosŏn'gŭl (조선글) in North Korea, has been used to write the Korean language since its creation in the 15th century by King Sejong the Great. It may also be written as Hangeul following the standard Romanization.

It is the official writing system of Korea, both South and North. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County in Jilin Province, China. It is also sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language spoken near the town of Baubau, Indonesia.

The Hangul alphabet originally consisted of 28 letters with 17 consonant letters and 11 vowel letters when it was created. As four became obsolete, the modern Hangul consists of total 24 letters with 14 consonant letters and 10 vowel letters. In North Korea the total is counted 40. It consists of 19 consonant letters and 21 vowel letters as it additionally includes 5 tense consonants (ㄲ ㄸ ㅃ ㅉ ㅆ) and 20 (for compound and complex vowel letters as well as ㅐ ㅔ).

The Korean letters are written in syllabic blocks with each alphabetic letter placed vertically and horizontally into a square dimension. For example, the Korean word for "honeybee" (kkulbeol) is written 꿀벌, not ㄲㅜㄹㅂㅓㄹ. As it combines the features of alphabetic and syllabic writing systems, it has been described as an "alphabetic syllabary" by some linguists. As in traditional Chinese writing, Korean texts were traditionally written top to bottom, right to left, and are occasionally still written this way for stylistic purposes. Today, it is typically written from left to right with spaces between words and western-style punctuation.Some linguists consider it among the most phonologically faithful writing systems in use today. One interesting feature of Hangul is that the shapes of its consonants seemingly mimic the shapes of the speaker's mouth when pronouncing each consonant.

Hangul Compatibility Jamo

Hangul Compatibility Jamo is a Unicode block containing Hangul characters for compatibility with Korean Standard KS X 1001:1998.

Hangul Jamo (Unicode block)

Hangul Jamo is a Unicode block containing positional (Choseong, Jungseong, and Jongseong) forms of the Hangul consonant and vowel clusters. They can be used to dynamically compose syllables that are not available as precomposed Hangul syllables in Unicode, specifically archaic syllables containing sounds that have since merged phonetically with other sounds in modern pronunciation.

Hangul consonant and vowel tables

The following tables of consonants and vowels of the Korean alphabet (jamo) display the basic forms in blue in the first row, and their derivatives in the following rows. They are separated into tables of initials, vowels and finals.

Jamo are romanized according to the Revised Romanization's transliteration rules. Thus, the table should not be used for normal transcription of Korean language, as sound changes must be observed.

ISO/TR 11941

ISO/TR 11941:1996 is a Korean romanization system used in ISO. It is not commonly used. One example of its use is in Unicode character names. The standard was withdrawn in December 2013.

It is very similar to Yale Romanization.

Korean manual alphabet

The Korean manual alphabet is used by the Deaf in South Korea who speak Korean Sign Language. It is a one-handed alphabet that mimics the shapes of the letters in hangul, and is used when signing Korean as well as being integrated into KSL.

ㄱ (기역, Giyeok(South); 기윽, Kiŭk(North)) is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㄱ is U+3131.

ㄹ (rieul) is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㄹ is U+3139.

ㅁ(miwm) is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅁ is U+3141.

ㅂ is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅂ is U+3142.

ㅇ(iwng) is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅇ is U+3147.

ㅈ(Tsiwt) is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅈ is U+3148.

ㅌ is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅌ is U+314C.

ㅍ is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅍ is U+314D.

ㅏ(ah) is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅏ is U+314F.

ㅚ is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅚ is U+315A.

ㅛ is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅛ is U+315B.

ㅜ is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅜ is U+315C.

ㅞ is one of the Korean hangul. The Unicode for ㅞ is U+315E.

Transcriptions
Revised RomanizationUi
Single jamo
Composite jamo
Encodings

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