Émile Cammaerts

Émile Leon Cammaerts CBE (16 March 1878 in Saint-Gilles, Belgium – 2 November 1953, Radlett, Hertfordshire) was a Belgian playwright, poet (including war poet) and author who wrote primarily in English and French.[n 1][1]

Demonstrating his interests, Cammaerts translated three books by art, history and landscapes expert John Ruskin [n 2] and selected G. K. Chesterton Father Brown detective stories in La clairvoyance du père Brown.[n 3]

He became Professor of Belgian Studies at the University of London in 1933, most of his works and papers are held there in the Senate House Library, and Emeritus Professor on retiring.[1]

Personal life

Cammaerts was born in Saint-Gilles, a suburb of Brussels. [n 4] He was educated at the University of Brussels and later at the revolutionary Université Nouvelle where he studied geography. He migrated to England in 1908 and was baptised as an Anglican aged 34 (c. 1912) taking for that event the middle name Pieter.[1]

He married the Shakespearian actress Helen Tita Braun, stage name Tita Brand (daughter of opera singer Marie Brema), with whom he had six children, including Pieter Cammaerts, who was killed while serving in the Royal Air Force during World War II, prominent SOE operative Francis Cammaerts[n 5] and Catherine Noel "Kippe" Cammaerts, an actress, and the mother of Michael Morpurgo.

Cammaerts is the author of a famous quotation (often mistakenly attributed to G. K. Chesterton) in his study on Chesterton:

When men choose not to believe in God, they do not thereafter believe in nothing. They then become capable of believing in anything.”[2]

Works

Poems

  • Belgian Poems : Chants patriotique, et autres poèmes (1915)[n 6]
  • New Belgian Poems. Les trois rois et autres poèmes (1916 - 3 editions)[n 7]
  • Messines and other Poems (1918)

Stage productions

Books

  • The Adoration of Soldiers (1916) with illustrated poems [n 9]
  • La Veillée de Noël. Les deux bossus (1917) [n 10]
  • Through the iron bars, two years of German occupation in Belgium (1917)
  • A ma patrie enchainée (1918) [n 11]
  • A history of Belgium from the Roman invasion to the present day (1921/2) [n 12]
  • The legend of Ulenspiegel (1922)
  • The Treasure of Belgium (1924)
  • The Poetry of Nonsense (1925)
  • Discoveries in England (1930)
  • Albert of Belgium, defender of right, a biography of King Albert I of Belgium (1935)
  • The Laughing Prophet: The Seven Virtues And G. K. Chesterton (Study of G. K. Chesterton - 1937)
  • The Keystone of Europe (1939)
  • The Prisoner at Laeken: King Leopold, Legend and Fact (1941)
  • The Situation of Belgium: September 1939 to January 1941 (1941)
  • Upon this rock (1943)
  • The flower of grass (1944/5) [n 13]
  • The peace that is left (1945)
  • Principalities and Powers with Jeanne Lindley (1947)[n 14]
  • The Devil takes the Chair (1949) [n 15]
  • The cloud and the silver lining (1952)[n 16] (followed by Christian contributions to the BBC Silver Lining Radio programme series
  • The Work of our Hands (1953) book on the themes of art and religion

Other

  • Translation of Guido Gezelle from the West Flemish dialect with Charles Van der Borren, Poèmes choisis [n 17]
  • Preface to The glory of Belgium - An anthology (1915) collated and edited by Russell Markland and dedicated on the front opening to Cammaerts.
  • Baron Edmond de Cartier de Marchienne (1946) booklet
  • Article on William Dobson, painter An English successor to van Dyck: William Dobson Second series no III [n 18]

Notes

  1. ^ Summarised by archivist Zoë Browne: "...became Professor Emeritus after his retirement from the university in 1947. He also received an honorary LL.D. from the University of Glasgow and a CBE. He was a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. During his life, Émile Cammaerts was a cartographer, geographer, journalist [for The Guardian (Anglican newspaper) that ended in 1951], poet, playwright, historian, art critic and devoted Anglican. He was Belgian by nationality, and deeply immersed in Belgian politics and culture.
  2. ^ Ruskin's Discussions on Architecture and Painting Conférences sur l'Architecture et la Peinture in 1910;
    Val d'Arno in 1911 and; Modern Landscape Painters as Les peintres modernes le paysage in 1914 all published by Henri Laurens, Paris
  3. ^ Perrin et Cie, Paris
  4. ^ Birth certificate № 234 in 1878, Saint-Gilles. His father Jean François Pierre Cammaerts, a lawyer, came from the town of Vilvoorde. His Brussels-born mother was Marie Henriëtte Eugénie Nypels whose father, also a lawyer, was born in Maastricht in present-day Dutch Limburg.
  5. ^ Francis Cammaerts was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and the Legion d'honneur, Croix de Guerre and the American Medal of Freedom.
  6. ^ (translated into English by his wife) John Lane and Bodley Head, London; John Lane Company, New York
  7. ^ (translated into English by his wife) John Lane and Bodley Head, London; John Lane Company, New York
  8. ^ at the first performance the poem was read by Tita Brand, Cammaerts' wife
  9. ^ With Louis Raemaekers, illustrator Longmans and Green and Co, London
  10. ^ Librarie Moderne, Brussels and London
  11. ^ G. Van Oest et Cie, Brussels and Paris
  12. ^ T Fisher Unwin Ltd, London
  13. ^ Cresset Press, London
  14. ^ Cresset Press, London
  15. ^ Cresset Press, London
  16. ^ A.R. Mowbray & Co, London
  17. ^ Louvain, 1908
  18. ^ Penguin Parade by Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, 1948

References

  1. ^ a b c d "The Cammaerts Papers - Catalogue" (PDF). Ulrls.lon.ac.uk.
  2. ^ from The Laughing Prophet: The Seven Virtues And G. K. Chesterton 1937

External links

1915 in poetry

In Flanders fields the poppies blowBetween the crosses, row on row,That mark our place; and in the skyThe larks, still bravely singing, flyScarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the dead. Short days agoWe lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,Loved, and were loved, and now we lieIn Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:To you from failing hands we throwThe torch; be yours to hold it high.If ye break faith with us who dieWe shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

And I have known the eyes already, known them all—

The eyes that fix you in a formulated phrase,

And when I am formulated, sprawling on a pin,

When I am pinned and wriggling on the wall,

Then how should I begin

To spit out all the butt-ends of my days and ways?

And how should I presume?

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1916 in poetry

—Closing lines of "Easter, 1916" by W. B. Yeats

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1918 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

Cammaerts

Cammaerts may refer to;

Francis Cammaerts

Émile Cammaerts Belgian educator

Carillon (Elgar)

Carillon is a recitation with orchestral accompaniment written by the English composer Edward Elgar as his Op. 75, in 1914. The words are by the Belgian poet Émile Cammaerts.

It was first performed in the Queen's Hall, London, on 7 December 1914, with the recitation by Cammaerts' wife Tita Brand, and the orchestra conducted by the composer.

The work was performed in January 1915 at the London Coliseum with Henry Ainley, and at Harrogate on 28 August 1915, with the soprano the Hon. Mrs. Julian Clifford and a military band. The band arrangement was by Percy Fletcher.

On 15 August 1918, Carillon and Le drapeau belge were performed with success at a popular concert in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, with the recitations by the Belgian dramatic artist Carlo Liten.

Fight for Right Movement

The Fight for Right Movement was founded in August 1915 by Francis Younghusband. Its aim was to increase support for the First World War in Great Britain and to boost morale in the armed forces.

Le drapeau belge

Le drapeau belge ("The Belgian Flag") is a recitation with orchestral accompaniment written by the English composer Edward Elgar as his Op. 79, in 1917. The words are by the Belgian poet Émile Cammaerts. The poem reflects on the wartime meaning of the colours of the Belgian flag.

It was first performed at the birthday concert for King Albert I in the Queen's Hall, London, on 14 April 1917, with the recitation by Belgian dramatic performer Carlo Liten, and the orchestra conducted by Hamilton Harty.

On 15 August 1918, Le drapeau belge and Carillon were performed with success at a popular concert in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, with the recitations by Carlo Liten.

List of compositions by Edward Elgar

The table below shows all known compositions by Edward Elgar.

List of compositions by Frank Bridge

Below is a sortable list of compositions by Frank Bridge. The works are categorized by genre, Hindmarsh catalogue number (H.), date of composition and title.

Michael Morpurgo

Sir Michael Andrew Bridge Morpurgo, (born Michael Andrew Bridge; 5 October 1943) is an English book author, poet, playwright, and librettist who is known best for children's novels such as War Horse (1982). His work is noted for its "magical storytelling", for recurring themes such as the triumph of an outsider or survival, for characters' relationships with nature, and for vivid settings such as the Cornish coast or World War I. Morpurgo became the third Children's Laureate, from 2003 to 2005.

Quand nos bourgeons se rouvriront

”Quand nos bourgeons se rouvriront” ("When the spring comes round") is a song for solo soprano, part of a staged recitation with orchestra Une voix dans le désert written by the English composer Edward Elgar in 1915. The words are by the Belgian poet Émile Cammaerts.

It was first performed in a performance of Une voix dans le désert at the Shaftesbury Theatre, London, on 29 January 1916, sung by the soprano Olga Lynn, with the recitation by the Belgian dramatic performer Carlo Liten, and the orchestra conducted by the composer.

The French title "Quand nos bourgeons se rouvriront" literally translates into "When our buds shall re-open", but in the English version of the lyrics, by Cammaerts' wife Tita Brand, it became "When the spring comes round".

The song was published separately by Elkin & Co. in 1916, inscribed "English version by R. H. Elkin". The words are the same as in the vocal score of Une voix dans le désert, so it is not clear whether the English translation of the song is by Tita Brand or by Elkin.

The Pall Mall Gazette described the scene on the wartime front in West Flanders, Belgium:

'It is night when the curtain rises, showing the battered dwelling, standing alone in the desolate land, with the twinkling of camp fires along the Yser in the distance, and in the foreground the cloaked figure of a man, who soliloquises on the spectacle ... the voice of a peasant girl is heard coming from the cottage, singing a song of hope and trust in anticipation of the day the war shall be ended ...'

Queen's College, London

Queen's College is an independent school for girls aged 11–18 with an adjoining prep school for girls aged 4–11 in the City of Westminster, London. Founded in 1848 by theologian and social reformer Frederick Denison Maurice, Professor of English Literature and History at King's College London, along with a committee of patrons, the College was the first institution in the world to award academic qualifications to women. In 1853, it also became the first girls' school to be granted a Royal Charter for the furtherance of women's education. Ever since, the College patron has been a British queen; the current patron is Queen Elizabeth II.The College has a distinctly liberal ethos based upon the principles of F.D. Maurice. Through its non-competitive spirit and avoidance of excessive regulation, the College claims to produce confident and open-minded young women. Like other colleges of its type, it offers a broad curriculum and a range of extra-curricular activities.

Radlett

Radlett is an affluent settlement in the county of Hertfordshire between St Albans and Elstree on Watling Street, with a population of 8,042. It is located in the council district of Hertsmere and is covered by two wards; Aldenham East and Aldenham West. It is located inside the M25 motorway.

Silva Carbonaria

Silva Carbonaria, the "charcoal forest", was the dense old-growth forest of beech and oak that formed a natural boundary during the Late Iron Age through Roman times into the Early Middle Ages across what is now western Wallonia. The Silva Carbonaria was a vast forest that stretched from the rivers Senne and the Dijle in the north to the Sambre in the south. Its northern outliers reached the then marshy site of modern Brussels.Further to the southeast, the higher elevation and deep river valleys were covered by the even less penetrable ancient Arduenna Silva, the deeply folded Ardennes, which are still partly forested to this day. To the east, the forest was possibly considered to extend to the Rhine. It was there in Cologne in 388 CE that the magistri militum praesentalis Nannienus and Quintinus began a counter-attack against a Frankish incursion from across the Rhine, which was fought in the Silva Carbonaria.

Une voix dans le désert

Une voix dans le désert ("A Voice in the Desert") is a recitation, with a soprano soloist and orchestra, written by the English composer Edward Elgar in 1915 as his Op. 77. The words are by the Belgian poet Émile Cammaerts.

It was first produced, in London at the Shaftesbury Theatre, on 29 January 1916, with the recitation by the Belgian dramatic performer Carlo Liten, the soprano Olga Lynn, and an orchestra conducted by the composer.

The words were translated into English by Cammaerts' wife, Tita Brand.

The work was published as a piano reduction (the vocal parts with piano accompaniment) by Elkin & Co. in 1916.

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