Çanakkale Province

Çanakkale Province (Turkish: Çanakkale ili) is a province of Turkey, located in the northwestern part of the country. It takes its name from the city of Çanakkale.

Like Istanbul, Çanakkale province has a European (Thrace) and an Asian (Anatolia) part. The European part is formed by the Gallipoli (Gelibolu) peninsula, while the Asian part is largely coterminous with the historic region of Troad in Anatolia. They are separated by the Dardanelles strait, connecting the Sea of Marmara and the Aegean Sea.

The archaeological site of Troy is found in Çanakkale province.

Çanakkale Province

Çanakkale ili
Location of Çanakkale Province in Turkey
Location of Çanakkale Province in Turkey
Coordinates: 40°02′27″N 26°33′37″E / 40.04083°N 26.56028°ECoordinates: 40°02′27″N 26°33′37″E / 40.04083°N 26.56028°E
CountryTurkey
RegionWest Marmara
Government
 • Electoral districtÇanakkale
Area
 • Total9,737 km2 (3,759 sq mi)
Population
 (2018)[1]
 • Total540,662
 • Density56/km2 (140/sq mi)
Area code(s)0286
Vehicle registration17

Short history

In the early Turkish Republic, the Çanakkale Province came into existence with the abolition of the Ottoman-era sanjaks of Biga and Gelibolu. According to a population census in 1927, Çanakkale had 8,500 inhabitants, except its neighbouring villages. It is recorded that Çanakkale, which was also called as "Hellespontos" and "Dardanelles" in ancient times, has accommodated to many civilizations for about 3,000 years. Even the Archaic Troy (Troia) city, where was governed by Lydians and destroyed by the devastating earthquake in 2500 BC, has ruins in today. In 336 BC, Persian Empire which became the crucial power in Anatolia and was conducted by Alexander the Great that aimed to extend ancient Greece all over the world, was defeated. Also with the ruin of the Anatolian beylik of Karesi, most of the territory of Canakkale was conquered in the Ottoman era, with the assistance of the castles in remuneration for helping to Byzantine Empire, locating Gelibolu. Afterwards, the Canakkale strait was given to the Ottoman Empire.

Agriculture

The province of Çanakkale is a notable region for viticulture and winemaking in Turkey. The region between Saros Gulf and Gelibolu on the Gallipoli peninsula is cultivated with vineyards.[2] Wine producer "Suvla" is located in Suvla.[3]

Districts

Çanakkale province is divided into 12 districts (capital district in bold):

Gallery

Havadan cnk

Çanakkale

Çanakkale Trojan Horse

Çanakkale Trojan Horse

Canakkale ferry

A ferry going from the town of Çanakkale to Gallipoli peninsula

Çanakkale10

A view of Çanakkale from the Dardanelles

Çanakkale3

Historical clock tower in Çanakkale town center

See also

References

  1. ^ "Population of provinces by years - 2000-2018". Turkish Statistical Institute. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  2. ^ Akyol, Cahit (2005-06-04). "İşte Türkiye'nin şaraplık üzüm haritası". Hürriyet (in Turkish). Retrieved 2015-07-28.
  3. ^ "Çanakkale'den Yepyeni Bir Şarap Markası: 'Suvla'" (in Turkish). Çanakkale'nin Rehberi. Retrieved 2015-07-28.

External links

Aegospotami

Aegospotami (Ancient Greek: Αἰγὸς Ποταμοί) or Aegospotamos (i.e. Goat Streams) is the ancient Greek name for a small river issuing into the Hellespont (Modern Turkish Çanakkale Boğazı), northeast of Sestos.At its mouth was the scene of the decisive battle in 405 BC in which Lysander destroyed the Athenian fleet, ending the Peloponnesian War. The ancient Greek township of the same name, whose existence is attested by coins of the 5th and 4th centuries, and the river itself were located in ancient Thrace in the Chersonese.According to ancient sources including Pliny the Elder and Aristotle, in 467 BC a large meteorite landed near Aegospotami. It was described as brown in colour and the size of a wagon load; it was a local landmark for more than 500 years. A comet, tentatively identified as Halley's Comet, was reported at the time the meteorite landed. This is possibly the first European record of Halley's comet.Aegospotami is located on the Dardanelles, northeast of the modern Turkish town of Sütlüce, Gelibolu.

Agora (Thrace)

Agora (Ancient Greek: Ἀγορά) was an ancient town situated about the middle of the narrow neck of the Thracian Chersonese (called today Gallipoli peninsula), and not far from Cardia, in what is now European Turkey. Xerxes, when invading Greece in 480 BCE, passed through it.Its site is tentatively located near modern Bolayır, Turkey.

Alexandria Troas

Alexandria Troas ("Alexandria of the Troad"; Greek: Αλεξάνδρεια Τρωάς; Turkish: Eski Stambul) is the site of an ancient Greek city situated on the Aegean Sea near the northern tip of Turkey's western coast, a little south of Tenedos (modern Bozcaada). It is located southeast of modern Dalyan, a village in the Ezine district of Çanakkale Province. The site sprawls over an estimated 400 hectares (990 acres); among the few structures remaining today are a ruined bath, an odeon, a theatre, gymnasium complex and a recently uncovered stadion. The circuit of the old walls can still be traced.

Assos

Assos (; Greek: Ἄσσος, Latin: Assus), also known as Behramkale or for short Behram, is a small historically rich town in the Ayvacık district of the Çanakkale Province, Turkey. During Pliny the Elder's time (1st century CE), the city also bore the name Apollonia (Ἀπολλωνία).After leaving the Platonic Academy in Athens, Aristotle (joined by Xenocrates) went to Assos, where he was welcomed by King Hermias, and opened an Academy in this city. Aristotle also married Pythias, the adopted daughter of Hermias. In the Academy of Assos, Aristotle became a chief to a group of philosophers, and together with them, he made innovative observations on zoology and biology. When the Persians attacked Assos, King Hermias was caught and put to death. Aristotle fled to Macedonia, which was ruled by his friend King Philip II of Macedon. There, he tutored Philip's son, Alexander the Great. There is a modern statue of Aristotle at the town entrance.The Acts of the Apostles refers to visits by Luke the Evangelist and Paul the Apostle to Assos (Acts 20:13-14)

.Today, Assos is an Aegean-coast seaside retreat amid ancient ruins. Since 2017 it is inscribed in the Tentative list of World Heritage Sites in Turkey.

Atikhisar Dam

Atikhisar Dam is a dam in Çanakkale Province, Turkey, built between 1964 and 1966.

Ayvacık Dam

Ayvacık Dam is a dam in Çanakkale Province, Turkey, built between 1997 and 2007.

Bayramdere Dam

Bayramdere Dam is a dam in Çanakkale Province, Turkey. It was built between 1999 and 2002.

Cebrene

Cebrene (Ancient Greek: Κεβρήνη), also spelled Cebren (Ancient Greek: Κεβρήν), was an ancient Greek city in the middle Skamander valley in the Troad region of Anatolia. According to some scholars, the city's name was changed to Antiocheia in the Troad (Ancient Greek: Ἀντιόχεια τῆς Τρωάδος) for a period during the 3rd century BCE (see below). Its archaeological remains have been located on Çal Dağ in the forested foothills of Mount Ida (modern Kaz Dağı), approximately 7 km to the south of the course of the Skamander. The site was first identified by the English amateur archaeologist Frank Calvert in 1860.

Cobrys

Cobrys or Kobrys (Ancient Greek: Κώβρυς) was a coastal Greek town in ancient Thrace, on the Thracian Chersonesus. It is mentioned in the Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax.There have been unconvincing attempts to identify Cobrys with Crobyle. Cobrys' site is located 1 mile (1.6 km) south of Kavak Suyu, in European Turkey.

Drabus

Drabus or Drabos (Ancient Greek: Δράβος) was a coastal Greek town in ancient Thrace, on the Thracian Chersonesus.There have been inconclusive attempts to identify Drabus with Araplus. Drabus' site is tentatively located near Ece Limani, in European Turkey.

Karabiga

Karabiga (Karabuga) is a town in Biga District, Çanakkale Province, in the Marmara region of Turkey. It is located at the mouth of the Biga River, on a small east-facing bay, known as Karabiga Bay. Its ancient name was Priapus or Priapos (Ancient Greek: Πρίαπος).

Koila (Thrace)

Koila was a town of ancient Thrace on the Thracian Chersonese.Its site is located 2 miles (3.2 km) north of Eçeabat in European Turkey.

Lamponeia

Lamponeia (Ancient Greek: Λαμπώνεια) or Lamponia (Λαμπωνία), also known as Lamponium or Lamponion (Λαμπώνιον), was a Aetolian city on the southern coast of the Troad region of Anatolia. Its archaeological remains have been located above the village of Kozlu in the district of Ayvacık in Çanakkale Province in Turkey. The site was first visited by Platon de Tchiatcheff in 1849, and later surveyed and identified as Lamponeia by Joseph Thacher Clarke, the excavator of nearby Assos, in 1882, and by Walther Judeich in 1896.

Lysimachia (Thrace)

Lysimachia (Greek: Λυσιμάχεια) was an important Hellenistic Greek town on the north-western extremity of the Thracian Chersonese (the modern Gallipoli peninsula) in the neck where the peninsula joins the mainland in what is now the European part of Turkey, not far from the bay of Melas (the modern Gulf of Saros).

Marpessos

Marpessos (Ancient Greek: Μάρπησσος) was a settlement in the middle Skamander valley of the Troad region of Anatolia. The settlement's name is also spelled Μαρμησσός, Μαρμισσός, Μερμησσός in ancient sources. It was known in Classical antiquity primarily as the birthplace of the Hellespontine Sibyl Herophile. Its site has been located at Dam Dere approximately 2 km SE of the village of Zerdalilik in the Bayramiç district of Çanakkale Province in Turkey. Despite the similarity of its name and its location on Mount Ida, the settlement is apparently unrelated to the mythological figure Marpessa and her husband Idas. It should likewise not be confused with the Mount Marpessa on Paros.

Paeon (Thrace)

Paeon or Paion (Ancient Greek: Παιών) was an ancient Greek city located in ancient Thrace, on the west coast of the Thracian Chersonesus. It is cited in the Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax, in the third position of its recitation of the towns of the Thracian Chersonesus, along with Cardia, Ide, Paeon, Alopeconnesus, Araplus, Elaeus and Sestos.Its site is tentatively located near Ece Liman, Turkey.

Scepsis

Scepsis or Skepsis (Ancient Greek: Σκῆψις or Σκέψις) was an ancient settlement in the Troad, Asia Minor that is at the present site of the village of Kurşunlutepe, near the town of Bayramiç in Turkey. The settlement is notable for being the location where the famous library of Aristotle was kept before being moved to Pergamum and Alexandria. It was also home to Metrodorus of Scepsis and Demetrius of Scepsis.

Sestos

Sestos (Greek: Σηστός, Latin: Sestus) was an ancient city in Thrace. It was located at the Thracian Chersonese peninsula on the European coast of the Hellespont, opposite the ancient city of Abydos, and near the town of Eceabat in Turkey.

In Greek mythology, Sestos is presented in the myth of Hero and Leander as the home of Hero.

Sigeion

Sigeion (Ancient Greek: Σίγειον, Sigeion; Latin: Sigeum) was an ancient Greek city in the north-west of the Troad region of Anatolia located at the mouth of the Scamander (the modern Karamenderes River). Sigeion commanded a ridge between the Aegean Sea and the Scamander which is now known as Yenişehir and is a part of the Çanakkale district in Çanakkale province, Turkey. The surrounding region was referred to as the Sigean Promonotory, which was frequently used as a point of reference by ancient geographers since it marked the mouth of the Hellespont. The outline of this promontory is no longer visible due to the alluvial activity of the Karamenderes which has filled in the embayment east of Yenişehir. The name 'Sigeion' means 'silent place' and is derived from Ancient Greek σιγή (sigē), 'silence'; in Classical Antiquity, the name was assumed to be antiphrastic, i.e. indicating a characteristic of the place contrary to reality, since the seas in this region are known for their fierce storms.

Çanakkale Province of Turkey
Districts

Languages

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